We acknowledge that we live and work on unceded Indigenous territories and we thank the Musqueam, Squamish and Tsleil-Waututh Nations for their hospitality.

Index

Results (433)

Review

The Heavens are Changing: Nineteenth-Century Protestant Missions and Tsimshian Christianity

WRITING IN Moon of Wintertime: Missionaries and the Indians of Canada in Encounter since 1534 (University of Toronto Press, 1984, 250) of seventeenth-century Jesuit missions to the Huron, John Webster Grant quoted a Huron man...

Review by J.R. Miller


Review

Strange Visitors: Documents in Indigenous-Settler Relations in Canada from 1876

This is a timely, thoughtful, and useful collection of primary documents on the history of the interactions among Indigenous people, non-Indigenous people, and the Canadian state. Given what is currently available, it will be invaluable...

Review by Hamar Foster


Review

Vancouver Vanishes: Narratives of Demolition and Revival

The cover and larger format pages of this handsomely produced book are drear images of demolition in the older inner suburbs of Vancouver. An array are pictured on the back cover rather in the manner...

Review by Rhodri Windsor Liscombe


Review

Art Inspired by the Canadian Rockies, Purcell Mountains and Selkirk Mountains, 1809-2012

  As Nancy Townshend writes in the preface of Art Inspired by the Canadian Rockies, Purcell Mountains and Selkirk Mountains, 1809-2012: “At one time, the Canadian Rockies, Purcell Mountains, and Selkirk Mountains existed as a...

Review by Maria Tippett


Review

Orienting Canada: Race, Empire and the Transpacific

The history of Canada’s Pacific relations has long been a neglected subject. The general consensus was that Pacific relations were not central to understanding the history of the country and its place in the world....

Review by Laura Madokoro


Review

Home, Work, and Play: Situating Canadian Social History, Third Edition

Home, Work, and Play is a reader designed for university or college students studying Canadian social history. The editors have put together a diverse collection that can be used at any level from a second...

Review by John-Henry Harter


Review

V6A: Writing from Vancouver’s Downtown Eastside

V6A is a postal code prefix in Vancouver. It is, thus, an artificial geographical space defined by a bureaucracy housed far from V6A itself. It runs from Burrard Inlet south to False Creek and Great...

Review by John Belshaw


Review

K’esu’: The Art and Life of Doug Cranmer

Jennifer Kramer’s book K’esu’: The Art and Life of Doug Cranmer was written to accompany the Museum of Anthropology’s 2012 landmark retrospective exhibit about the life and work of the internationally renowned Kwakwaka’wakw artist Doug...

Review by Carolyn Butler Palmer


Review

Nikkei in the Pacific Northwest: Japanese Americans and Japanese Canadians in the Twentieth Century

This long-awaited book emerged from a May 2000 conference entitled “The Nikkei Experiences in the Pacific Northwest.” The conference was organized by the Department of History at the University of Washington (UW) in conjunction with...

Review by Yuko Shibata


Review

Capital and Labour in the British Columbia Forest Industry, 1934-1974

A few exceptions aside, the remarkable escalation of books that have investigated British Columbia’s forests and forest economy in recent years have not paid much attention to labour. Yet labour’s role is vital to the evolution...

Review by Roger Hayter


Review

Making Native Space: Colonialism, Resistance, and Reserves in British Columbia

OVERVIEW  IN MAKING NATIVE SPACE, Cole Harris describes how settlers displaced Aboriginal people from their land in British Columbia,1 painstakingly documenting the creation of Indian reserves in the province from the 1830s to 1938. Informed...

Review by Val Napoleon


Review

The Gold Will Speak For Itself: Peter Leech and Leechtown

Vancouver Island has a distinctive personality among the regions of British Columbia, one that has been shaped in complex ways by geography and history. The books reviewed here vary in their candlepower, but all of...

Review by Patrick Dunae


Review

Juan de Fuca’s Strait: Voyages in the Waterway of Forgotten Dreams

The story of Greek mariner Juan de Fuca’s report to English merchant Michael Lok, in Venice in 1592, of the entrance to a waterway on the northwest coast of North America around the parallel 48ËšN...

Review by Daniel Clayton


Review

Rebel Youth: 1960s Labour Unrest, Young Workers, and New Leftists in English Canada

With Rebel Youth, Ian Milligan hearkens back to the political youth movements that went to the barricades, the conferences, and the picket lines in the 1960s, and in the process historicizes the events and people...

Review by Ron Verzuh


Review

Fort St. James and New Caledonia: Where British Columbia Began

Many residents of British Columbia are probably unaware that the settler history of the province began not in the Fraser Valley but in New Caledonia, the north-central interior, a result not of the explorations of...

Review by William Morrison


Review

Where the Pavement Ends

Marie Wadden is a non-Aboriginal investigative journalist/network producer for CBC Radio who is based in St. John’s, Newfoundland. In 1981, she shared her home with two Innu youth who came to the city from Sheshatshiu,...

Review by Shelly Johnson


Review

The Library Book: a History of Service to British Columbia

Accepting the challenge to produce, within a fixed deadline, a comprehensive overview of the evolution of libraries in British Columbia must have been daunting. Works of this sort are most often destined to grow old,...

Review by Tom Shorthouse


Review

Boundless Optimism: Richard McBride’s British Columbia

Patricia E. Roy’s Boundless Optimism: Richard McBride’s British Columbia examines the political career of one of the province’s most significant premiers. Born in New Westminster in 1870 and educated at New Westminster High School and...

Review by Duff Sutherland


Review

Profit and Ambition, The North West Company and the Fur Trade 1779-1821

This booklet was published to accompany the Canadian Museum of Civilization’s current exhibition (by the same name), which ends 6 February 2011. It is more than just a catalogue because, in addition to the superb...

Review by Marie Elliott


Review

David Douglas, a Naturalist at Work: An Illustrated Exploration across Two Centuries in the Pacific Northwest

In June 1824, the Governor and Committee of the Hudson’s Bay Company agreed to transport David Douglas, a young Scottish employee of the Horticultural Society of London to its “Columbia District,” to assist the society’s...

Review by Ted Binnema