We acknowledge that we live and work on unceded Indigenous territories and we thank the Musqueam, Squamish and Tsleil-Waututh Nations for their hospitality.

Index

Results (171)

Book Review

The British Columbia Court of Appeal: The First Hundred Years, 1910-2010

A law court has an inner life, beyond the many outside lives that it can rescue, ruin, remedy and reward. When it is an appellate court, the urge to converge as group judgment replaces the...

Review by DeLloyd Guth


Book Review

The Unnatural History of Stanley Park Exhibit, Vancouver Museum

PDF – Kheraj Review Essay, BC Studies 161, Spring 2009

Review by Sean Kheraj


Book Review

Long Beach Wild: A Celebration of People and Place on Canada’s Rugged Western Shore

Long Beach Wild is the kind of book that academics are often quick to dismiss. It’s popular history, after all (academics, of course, preferring unpopular histories), by a freelance writer whose many previous works include...

Review by Philip Van Huizen


Book Review

Caring and Compassion: A History of the Sisters of St. Ann in Health Care in British Columbia

Today, Mount St. Mary Hospital, an extended care facility in Victoria, is one of the last visible legacies of the Sisters of St. Ann’s contributions to health care in British Columbia. But for more than...

Review by Lisa Pasolli


Book Review

V6A: Writing from Vancouver’s Downtown Eastside

V6A is a postal code prefix in Vancouver. It is, thus, an artificial geographical space defined by a bureaucracy housed far from V6A itself. It runs from Burrard Inlet south to False Creek and Great...

Review by John Belshaw


Book Review

Exploring Fort Vancouver

This fine volume is truly a “must” for those with more than a passing interest in the origins of the multi-ethnic area of the Pacific Northwest Coast, from the Aboriginal inhabitants to the eighteenth and...

Review by Stanley Copp


Book Review

Our Friend Joe: The Joe Fortes Story

As one Daily Province journalist put it in 1916, “to write an article about English Bay without referring to Joe Fortes, would be like Hamlet without the Prince” (118). For nearly forty years the legendary...

Review by John Belshaw


Book Review

Manufacturing National Park Nature: Photography, Ecology, and the Wilderness Industry of Jasper

Contributing to the emerging and vibrant field of national park histories in Canada, J. Keri Cronin’s Manufacturing National Park Nature: Photography, Ecology, and the Wilderness Industry of Jasper explores how photographs created for tourist consumption...

Review by Jenny Clayton


Book Review

A Hard Man to Beat: The Story of Bill White, Labour Leader, Historian, Shipyard Worker, Raconteur

Selected as one of ten Vancouver books reprinted to celebrate the city’s 125th anniversary, A Hard Man to Beat is perhaps even more important now than when it was first published. Then, Bill White’s lively...

Review by Mark Leier


Book Review

Raincoast Chronicles 21: West Coast Wrecks and Other Maritime Tales

Tales of shipwrecks along British Columbia’s coast have focused on adventure and tragedy since the fur trade era. With marine transportation occupying such an important role in our daily lives, it is remarkable that so...

Review by David Hill-Turner


Book Review

The Uchuck Years: A West Coast Shipping Saga

The Uchuck Years is the tale of how two partners managed to keep a passenger and freight service afloat on Vancouver Island’s West Coast and pass the company on to the next generation. David Esson...

Review by Kenneth Campbell


Book Review

Rumble Seat, A Victorian Childhood Remembered

Helen Piddington’s Rumble Seat, A Victorian Childhood Remembered is a collection of 117 brief reminiscences of the author’s childhood on southern Vancouver Island during the Depression and World War Two. Born in 1931, Piddington was...

Review by Christopher Hanna


Book Review

Measure of the Year: Reflections on Home, Family, and a Life Fully Lived

As part of its ‘Classics West Collection’ Touch Wood Editions has released a trade paperback edition of Measure of the Year, Roderick Haig-Brown’s celebrated collection of seasonal essays, with a foreword by poet Brian Brett....

Review by Des Kennedy


Book Review

The Drive: A Retail, Social and Political History of Commercial Drive, Vancouver, to 1956

On the morning of April 8, 1949, a nattily-dressed crook named Robert Harrison visited the Bank of Commerce at the corner of First Avenue and Commercial Drive and relieved it of $3,000. Armed with a...

Review by Daniel Francis


Book Review

Victoria: Crown Jewel of British Columbia, Including Esquimalt, Oak Bay, Saanich and the Peninsula

This book claims to be a “multi-faceted photo-essay” which combines historical detail with compelling narrative to provide the visitor with new insights into the many wonders of Victoria and its environs. As an extra bonus,...

Review by Will Garnett


Book Review

These Mysterious People: Shaping History and Archaeology in a Northwest Coast Community

In the summer of 1968, my grandmother would sometimes take my young aunt and uncle to the northern bank of the outflow of the Fraser River to dig for “Indian treasure” at the Marpole Midden....

Review by Madeline Knickerbocker


Book Review

Whoever Gives us Bread: The Story of Italians in British Columbia

More than twenty years ago, Gabriele Scardellato lamented the dearth of attention to Italian Canadians living “beyond the frozen wastes” (Scardellato 1989). There have been modest advances since that time, including Patricia K. Wood’s Nationalism...

Review by Stephen Fielding


Book Review

British Columbia’s Magnificent Parks: The First 100 Years

James D. Anderson’s British Columbia’s Magnificent Parks: The First 100 Years is a tribute to the first century of the Provincial Park system in BC. This thoroughly researched and richly illustrated history, sensitive to ongoing...

Review by J. Cronin


Book Review

Bruce McDonald’s “Hard Core Logo”

Although it’s one of the three major production sites In Canada, surprisingly few memorable movies have actually been made in Vancouver. Even lonely Winnipeg has fared better in this regard, with cinematic mythologizer Guy Maddin...

Review by Mark Harris