We acknowledge that we live and work on unceded Indigenous territories and we thank the Musqueam, Squamish and Tsleil-Waututh Nations for their hospitality.

Index

Results (171)

Book Review

Animal Metropolis: Histories of Human-Animal Relations in Urban Canada

Animal Metropolis: Histories of Human-Animal Relations in Urban Canada edited by Joanna Dean, Darcy Ingram, and Christabelle Sethna represents a collective effort to create a historiography of nonhuman animals and human subjects in Canada since...

Review by Stephanie Eccles


Book Review

The Peace in Peril: The Real Cost of the Site C Dam

Anything written about the Site C dam in the past year or two was bound to become dated rapidly, given the pace of events, the uncertainty around the future of the project after the 2017...

Review by Matthew Evenden


Book Review

Art Inspired by the Canadian Rockies, Purcell Mountains and Selkirk Mountains, 1809-2012

  As Nancy Townshend writes in the preface of Art Inspired by the Canadian Rockies, Purcell Mountains and Selkirk Mountains, 1809-2012: “At one time, the Canadian Rockies, Purcell Mountains, and Selkirk Mountains existed as a...

Review by Maria Tippett


Book Review

The Royal Fjord: Memories of Jervis Inlet

In The Royal Fjord, Ray Phillips, a long-time resident of the Sunshine Coast, finishes a job his late father started. It is, says Phillips, a book of “many anecdotes [and other stories that] tell some...

Review by Howard Stewart


Book Review

One More Time! The Dal Richards Story

  Local icon Dal Richards passed away on New Year’s Eve 2015. In the tributes that followed and at his memorial, many noted the auspiciousness of his passing. For years, his New Year’s Eve concerts...

Review by Vanessa Colantonio


Book Review

Remembered in Bronze and Stone: Canada’s Great War Memorial Statuary

In the two decades following the Great War, Canadian sculptors, architects and stonemasons produced over four thousand war monuments in the form of plaques, shafts, crosses, obelisks, stelae and figurative sculptures. Some were paid for...

Review by Maria Tippett


Book Review

The Art of Jeffrey Rubinoff

Jeffrey Rubinoff (1945-2017) is one of the great sculptors in steel of the second half of the twentieth century. In the 1970s and 1980s he exhibited widely in the United States and Canada. Though poised...

Review by Susan Lewis


Book Review

Cleaner Greener Smarter: A Prescription for Stronger Canadian Environmental Laws and Policies

The World Health Organization released an update to the Global Urban Ambient Air Pollution Database on 12 May 2016, finding that more than 80 percent of people who live in major cities around the world...

Review by Deborah Curran


Book Review

The Salish Sea: Jewel of the Pacific Northwest

Audrey DeLella Benedict and Joseph Gaydos’s book about the Salish Sea, like Beamish and McFarlane’s recent tome on the Strait of Georgia (or North Salish Sea), The Sea Among Us, is a gorgeously illustrated and...

Review by Howard Stewart


Book Review

A Taste of Haida Gwaii: Food Gathering and Feasting at the Edge of the World

There is an alternative out there to the globalized world of agribusiness, GMOs (genetically modified organisms), and processed packaged food, one based on harvesting and using local, especially wild, foods and re-weaving them into our...

Review by Nancy J. Turner


Book Review

Watershed Moments: A Pictorial History of Courtenay and District

Those who would wish to time-travel to the Comox Valley of the First World War era need only to walk the streets of today’s Courtenay downtown core. There they will encounter numerous large publicly-displayed photographs...

Review by Dan Hinman-Smith


Book Review

Vancouver Vanishes: Narratives of Demolition and Revival

The cover and larger format pages of this handsomely produced book are drear images of demolition in the older inner suburbs of Vancouver. An array are pictured on the back cover rather in the manner...

Review by Rhodri Windsor Liscombe


Book Review

Spirits of the Rockies: Reasserting an Indigenous Presence in Banff National Park

The history of Indigenous peoples and parks — notably their exclusion from such places — is a field of study that has blossomed over the past two decades. Courtney Mason’s Spirits of the Rockies: Reasserting...

Review by Jonathan Clapperton


Book Review

Home, Work, and Play: Situating Canadian Social History, Third Edition

Home, Work, and Play is a reader designed for university or college students studying Canadian social history. The editors have put together a diverse collection that can be used at any level from a second...

Review by John-Henry Harter


Book Review

Climber’s Paradise: Making Canada’s Mountain Parks, 1906-1974

Two powerful and iconic institutions can be found at the centre of most histories of tourism and recreation in the mountains of western Canada: the Canadian Pacific Railway and the agency known today as Parks...

Review by Ben Bradley


Book Review

Made in British Columbia: Eight Ways of Making Culture

At first glance, I was sceptical of Made in British Columbia. What more could possibly be written about painter Emily Carr or architects Francis Rattenbury and Arthur Erickson? But Maria Tippett’s carefully crafted biographies of...

Review by Michael Kluckner


Book Review

The Chinchaga Firestorm: When the Moon and Sun Turned Blue

Some fires are justly renowned. Some are celebrities — known for being known. A few are famous for being unknown. The 1871 Peshtigo fire in the US has long marketed itself as America’s Forgotten Fire....

Review by Stephen J. Pyne


Book Review

Vancouver Blue: A Life Against Crime

Wayne Cope joined the Vancouver Police Department (VPD) in 1975, the fulfillment of a childhood dream to be a police officer. Like most police memoirs, Cope’s is filled with anecdotal stories, some humorous and some...

Review by Bonnie Reilly Schmidt


Book Review

New Perspectives on the Gold Rush

Under editor Kathryn Bridge, New Perspectives on the Gold Rush teams up academic historians, archaeologists, and museum professionals in an effort to add previously marginalized voices to traditional histories of British Columbia’s gold rush. Despite...

Review by Mica Jorgenson


Book Review

The Gold Will Speak For Itself: Peter Leech and Leechtown

Vancouver Island has a distinctive personality among the regions of British Columbia, one that has been shaped in complex ways by geography and history. The books reviewed here vary in their candlepower, but all of...

Review by Patrick Dunae