We acknowledge that we live and work on unceded Indigenous territories and we thank the Musqueam, Squamish and Tsleil-Waututh Nations for their hospitality.

Index

Results (59)

Review

Breaking Ground: The Lower Elwha Klallam Tribe and the Unearthing of Tze-whit-zen Village

Breaking Ground, by journalist Lynda Mapes, is a compelling, well told story of a Coast Salish tribe in Washington State – the Lower Elwha – and its fraught relations with the settler community that grew...

Review by Bruce Miller


Review

The Wheel Keeper

In The Wheel Keeper , first-time novelist Robert Pepper-Smith, an instructor at Malaspina University College in Nanaimo, British Columbia, has written an engaging and often enchanting tale that draws heavily on three generations of the...

Review by Gabriele Scardellato


Review

Sutebusuton: A Japanese Village on the British Columbia Coast

MITSUO YESAKI was born in Steveston, known to its early Japanese-Canadian residents as Sutebusuton. He spent his early childhood there until the expulsion of Japanese Canadians from the West Coast in 1942. He is a...

Review by Ann Dore


Review

Early Indian Village Churches: Wooden Frontier Architecture in British Columbia

PDF – Book Reviews, BC Studies 38, Summer 1978  

Review by S.W. Jackman


Review

Watara- Dori (Birds of Passage)

WATARA-DORI (Birds of Passage) is a biographical fiction of a half-year period (24 June 1915 to 1 January 1916) in the life of a Japanese-Canadian fisher. Mitsuo Yesaki has a thorough knowledge of the Pacific coast fisheries,...

Review by Michiko Ayukawa


Review

Masterworks of the Classical Haida Mythtellers

THE IDEA OF a story being as sharp as a knife, which is the title of Robert Bringhurst’s astonishing introduction to the works of classical Haida poets, is a useful proposition to consider in order...

Review by Terry Glavin


Review

Nikkei Fishermen on the BC Coast: Their Biographies and Photographs

The term “Nikkei” has become prevalent in the last decade or two. Its broad definition is “people of Japanese descent and their descendants,” and includes those of mixed heritage. It assumes they have an interest...

Review by Michiko Ayukawa


Review

Voices of a Thousand People: The Makah Cultural Research Center

THE MAKAH TRIBE at Neah Bay, Washington State, has become one of the most visible and controversial Indigenous communities in North America due to the media gaze on their efforts to revive traditional whaling in...

Review by Michael Marker


Review

People of the Middle Fraser Canyon: An Archaeological History

The authors, from the departments of anthropology at the University of Montana (Prentiss) and the University of Notre Dame (Kuijt), draw on their extensive and recent archaeological work in the interior of British Columbia to...

Review by Douglas Hudson


Review

Svoboda

Bill Stenson’s Svoboda is a coming-of-age novel set in the West Kootenay during the 1950s. Vasili Saprikin is a Doukhobor who spends most of his earliest years with his mother (a widow) and grandfather in...

Review by Duff Sutherland


Review

The Good Hope Cannery: Life and Death at a Salmon Cannery

Until post-war technology allowed for the centralization of salmon canning, the industry relied on numerous canneries located close to the fishing grounds. More than 200 canneries were scattered along the BC coast, and apart from...

Review by Kenneth Campbell


Review

Maker of Monsters: The Extraordinary Life of Beau Dick

The recent passing of Beau Dick makes this documentary film both a testament and an affirmation of an extraordinary life. More than a recitation of the chronology of his life, the filmmakers have created a...

Review by Michelle McGeough


Review

The Letters of Margaret Butcher: Missionary-Imperialism on the North Pacific Coast

As a study of missionary imperialism, Mary-Ellen Kelm’s edition of the letters Margaret Butcher wrote from Kitamaat between 1916 and 1919 makes an important contribution to historical conversations about the Haisla, missionaries, and residential schools...

Review by Jacqueline Gresko


Review

Terrain of Memory: A Japanese Canadian Memorial Project

After the Second World War, most of the Japanese relocated in camps in the interior were sent to Ontario or to Japan, while many of those who remained in British Columbia, largely the elderly or...

Review by Cole Harris


Review

Unbuilt Victoria

What if? Ah yes, that perennial question. What would a city look like if the “unbuilt” were actually built? What if a municipality’s proposed plans were followed “to a tee”? Sometimes the rejection of a...

Review by Larry McCann


Review

Stanley Park’s Secret: The Forgotten Families of Whoi Whoi, Kanaka Ranch and Brockton Point

Jean Barman brings clarity to a long misunderstood part of the early history of Vancouver and British Columbia. Building upon earlier re-search on Stanley Park by William C. McKee (Urban History Review 3 [1978]), Robert...

Review by Sean Kheraj


Review

Bill Reid and the Haida Canoe

Most people identify Northwest Coast Aboriginal culture with the totem pole, most notably with the dramatic Thunderbird-winged carvings of the Kwakwaka’wakw Peoples. In Bill Reid and the Haida Canoe, Martine Reid and co-authors James Raffan and Michael...

Review by Maria Tippett


Review

“We are Still Didene”: Stories of Hunting and History from Northern British Columbia

We read this book as the British Columbia government announced that oil and gas development will be banned in the “Sacred Headwaters,” the vast tract of land in North Central British Columbia where the Nass,...

Review by Jillian Ridington


Review

The Gold Will Speak For Itself: Peter Leech and Leechtown

Vancouver Island has a distinctive personality among the regions of British Columbia, one that has been shaped in complex ways by geography and history. The books reviewed here vary in their candlepower, but all of...

Review by Patrick Dunae


Review

Writing the West Coast: In Love with Place

In the two generations since the first postmodern attempts to create a pan-cultural literature of place on the Pacific Coast, the context of landscape writing in British Columbia has been radically transformed. The environmental movement...

Review by Harold Rhenisch


Review

Nationalism from the Margins: Italians in Alberta and British Columbia

According to Patricia Wood, ethnic studies in Canada – or at least the study of Italian immigrants and their descendants – is at best a marginal or fringe activity in the Canadian academy. She complains,...

Review by Gabriele Scardellato


Review

Wires in the Wilderness: The Story of the Yukon Telegraph

IT WAS WITH SOME excitement and a little trepidation that I agreed to review Bill Miller’s book. First of all, my father, George Ball, was a Yukon Telegraph Line operator in the early years; and...

Review by Georgiana Ball


Review

Raincoast Chronicles Fourth Five

The sinking of the BC Ferries vessel Queen of the North on 22 March 2006 has brought the lives of British Columbia’s coastal residents into sharp and extraordinary focus. It is a safe bet that...

Review by Jocelyn Smith


Review

Making Wawa: The Genesis of Chinook Jargon

It is difficult to research and write about the history of British Columbia without coming across snippets of Chinook Jargon. Within living memory, it was the lingua franca in coastal logging camps and salmon canneries,...

Review by Forrest Pass