We acknowledge that we live and work on unceded Indigenous territories and we thank the Musqueam, Squamish and Tsleil-Waututh Nations for their hospitality.

Index

Results (21)

Review

The Kelowna Story: An Okanagan History

Sharron Simpson’s The Kelowna Story offers her clear intention of providing for the people of Kelowna, most of whom are recent arrivals, “a collective memory” (9) about the origin and development of their community. Overall,...

Review by David Dendy


Review

Reflections on “Oasis”: Representing Kelowna, 1905-2005

PDF – MacHardy Review Essay, BC Studies 148, Winter 2005/06

Review by Carolyn MacHardy


Review

Myra’s Men: Building the Kettle Valley Railway, Myra Canyon to Penticton

In August 2003, the Okanagan Mountain Park fire southeast of Kelowna destroyed or damaged the Myra Canyon trestles, eighteen railroad structures, and the roadbed between them. This 5.5-mile (8.9-km) elevated path around a mountainous amphitheatre...

Review by Frank Leonard


Review

Valley Sutra

Kuldip Gill’s Valley Sutra is a posthumous volume, assembled by the author shortly before her death in 2009. This vibrant, accessible collection with its “iridescent shimmers” is also divided into two parts, with the author’s...

Review by David Stouck


Review

Train Master: The Railway Art of Max Jacquiard

Train Master: The Railway Art of Max Jacquiard, the new book by the noted transportation historian Barry Sanford, looks at British Columbian railways from 1925 to 1955, as depicted in ninety-nine paintings by Jacquiard. The...

Review by Ian Pooley


Review

UBC: The First 100 Years

With its heavy glossy paper, large format, and copious illustrations, this looks like a celebratory coffee table book. To classify it as such would be wrong. Drawing on previous histories of the University of British...

Review by Patricia Roy


Review

Lives Lived West of the Divide: A Biographical Dictionary of Fur Traders Working West of the Rockies, 1793-1858 Volumes 1-3

In 1793 Alexander Mackenzie crossed the continent in search of a route to the Pacific for the North West Company trade. He reached the Pacific at Dean Channel but failed to find a viable trade...

Review by Nancy Marguerite Anderson


Review

The Reckoning of Boston Jim: A Novel

In the aftermath of the Crimean War, Eugene Augustus Hume resigns his commission. Later, hearing the casual remark that the charge of the Light Brigade was unnecessary, Eugene thinks to himself “The whole war was...

Review by Jocelyn Smith


Review

Awful Splendour: A Fire History of Canada

For anyone familiar with environmental history, Stephen J. Pyne is as synonymous with the word “fire” as is Smokey the Bear. As a former firefighter in the Grand Canyon, a renowned historian at Arizona State...

Review by Philip Van Huizen


Review

Liberal Hearts and Coronets: The Lives and Times of Ishbel Marjoribanks Gordon and John Campbell Gordon, the Aberdeens

Veronica Strong-Boag announces at the outset of her latest book that “Lords and ladies are rarely in fashion for critical scholars or democratic activists. This is unfortunate” (3). Thankfully she decided to take on Ishbel...

Review by Carolyn MacHardy


Review

Okanagan Geology South: Geologic Highlights of the South Okanagan, British Columbia

Guidebooks present risks. Some authors inadvertently lead readers into the minutia that is their passion. Others find themselves indulging in editorial or polemic. Yet others lose their readers in what might be described as a...

Review by Wayne Wilson


Review

Okanagan Artists in their Studios

It is often said that the images that come to mind when thinking or writing about the cultural history of British Columbia are the province’s varied landscape and the art of the First Nations people....

Review by Maria Tippett


Review

The Chinchaga Firestorm: When the Moon and Sun Turned Blue

Some fires are justly renowned. Some are celebrities — known for being known. A few are famous for being unknown. The 1871 Peshtigo fire in the US has long marketed itself as America’s Forgotten Fire....

Review by Stephen J. Pyne


photo essay