We acknowledge that we live and work on unceded Indigenous territories and we thank the Musqueam, Squamish and Tsleil-Waututh Nations for their hospitality.

Index

Results (308)

Book Review

The Object’s the Thing: The Writings of Yorke Edwards, a Pioneer of Heritage Interpretation in Canada

When we visit a nature park or a museum, do we consider how interpretation contributed to our experience? For Yorke Edwards, “the father of nature interpretation in Canada,” interpreting the object is “the thing.” As...

Review by Patricia E. Roy


Book Review

Captain Cook Rediscovered: Voyaging to the Icy Latitudes

On 12 July 1776 Captain James Cook, Royal Navy, sailed from Plymouth, England, in the three-master collier, Resolution, in search of the fabled Northwest Passage. It was a voyage that swept Cook and the crews...

Review by Barry Gough


Book Review

A Bounded Land: Reflections on Settler Colonialism in Canada

Historical geographer Cole Harris, professor emeritus at UBC, has in his latest book brought together a number of his articles, some previously published, to focus on the subject of settler colonialism in Canada. It is...

Review by Kenneth Favrholdt


Book Review

Civilian Internment in Canada: Histories and Legacies

“There is no single historiography of internment” in Canada, write Rhonda L. Hinter and Jim Mochoruk in the introduction of this ambitious collection of essays (9-10). Siloed histories of particular internments, they suggest, convey episodic...

Review by Jordan Stanger-Ross


Book Review

In Nature’s Realm: Early Naturalists Explore Vancouver Island

In Nature’s Realm, a third tome from Michael Layland that focuses on the (mostly) colonial histories of Vancouver Island, is an artistic and literary achievement. Layland’s hybrid of chronological and thematic descriptions of Vancouver Island-related...

Review by Nicholas Stanger


Book Review

Northwest Voices: Language and Culture in the Pacific Northwest

What, if anything, is the socio-linguistic glue that binds together the region often referred to as the Pacific Northwest? When it comes to language and culture, do the peoples of Washington and Oregon in the...

Review by Mark Turin


Book Review

The Elements of Indigenous Style: A Guide for Writing By and About Indigenous Peoples

Gregory Younging’s (1961-2019) The Elements of Indigenous Style is a testament to how prioritizing listening to Indigenous peoples, instead of merely writing about them, can both change the way settlers view their relationship with Indigenous peoples...

Review by Mercedes Peters


Book Review

Iroquois in the West

Sometimes the most detailed and poignant histories emerge from historical fragments. In Iroquois in the West Jean Barman uses what she calls “slivers of stories from the shadows of the past” to tell a rich...

Review by Dane Allard


Book Review

Service on the Skeena: Horace Wrinch, Frontier Physician

Although both Horace C. Wrinch and his wife Alice are featured in Eldon Lee’s Scalpels and Buggywhips (1997), Horace Wrinch is little known, despite his extraordinary contributions to British Columbia society. Geoff Mynett, a retired lawyer...

Review by Ted Binnema


Book Review

Talking Back to the Indian Act: Critical Readings in Settler Colonial Histories

History as an academic discipline recognizes that how we understand the past is no more than that. It is how we understand the past, and not necessarily what actually transpired in distant times that we...

Review by David Milward


Book Review

Love of the Salish Sea Islands: New Essays, Memoir and Poetry by 40 Island Writers

The Salish Sea is an international ecosystem that features an amazing array of gorgeous and largely tranquil islands. Tourists and residents enjoy the rural simplicity of the islands and from most appearances, the living is...

Review by Ginny Broadhurst


Book Review

When Days Are Long: Nurse in the North

In this book, first published upon her retirement in 1965, Amy Wilson presents a biographical history of her career as a public health nurse in Northern British Columbia and the Yukon during the 1950s and...

Review by Geertje Boschma


Book Review

Indigenous Repatriation Handbook

The First Peoples of the Pacific Coast are at the forefront of Indigenous Museology and Repatriation Scholarship. While some communities might be just starting to tangle with the complex politics and strategies of claiming back...

Review by Anna De Aguayo


Book Review

Planning on the Edge: Vancouver and the Challenges of Reconciliation, Social Justice and Sustainable Development

Planning on the Edge: Vancouver and the Challenges of Reconciliation, Social Justice, and Sustainable Development (2019) is a compelling edited collection written from an interdisciplinary perspective. The book treats the state of metropolitan Vancouver’s development as...

Review by Ian Rocksborough-Smith


Book Review

Shared Histories: Witsuwit’en-Settler Relations in Smithers, British Columbia, 1913-1973

Geographer Tyler McCreary’s book about Witsuwit’en-settler relations in Smithers is a valuable new addition to research and writing on histories of place in settler-colonial contexts. Shared Histories demonstrates how academic work can be integrated with local...

Review by Molly Malone


Book Review

The Last Suffragist Standing: The Life and Times of Laura Marshall Jamieson

Veronica Strong-Boag is one of Canada’s most distinguished women’s historians.  One of the major themes of her publishing career has been Canadian women’s struggle for the vote. Strong-Boag’s expertise in the field is very much...

Review by Lynne Marks


Book Review

By Law or In Justice

The foundation of Professor Jane Dickson’s book, By Law Or in Justice, is her work as a Commissioner for the Indian Specific Claims Commission, from 2002 to 2009. The Commission itself endured from 1991 to...

Review by David Milward


Book Review

Suffer the Little Children: Genocide, Indigenous Nations and the Canadian State

Tamara Starblanket is a Nehiyaw (Cree) legal scholar from Ahthakakoop First Nation and is currently the Dean of Academics at the Native Education College in Vancouver, which is located on the traditional territories of the...

Review by Carling Beninger


Book Review

At the Bridge: James Teit and an Anthropology of Belonging

James Teit was an amazing community-based engaged anthropologist long before such labels were invented. Wendy Wickwire’s anthropological life story of Teit is a consummate account and indeed, as the top of page advertisement exhorts, it...

Review by Charles R. Menzies


Book Review

Gold Rush Manliness: Race and Gender on the Pacific Slope

Ten years and many miles separated two distinct, yet in some ways similar, gold rushes. In 1848, rumors of gold at Sutter’s Mill sparked a process that would lure roughly 265,000 people to California, a...

Review by Alice Gorton