We acknowledge that we live and work on unceded Indigenous territories and we thank the Musqueam, Squamish and Tsleil-Waututh Nations for their hospitality.

Index

Results (138)

Book Review

Fernie at War 1914-1919

Wayne Norton provides a fascinating story of a British Columbia resource town navigating its way through the tribulations of the Great War.  In so doing, he adds to the small but growing body of works that...

Review by R. Scott Sheffield


Book Review

Witness to Loss

Witness to Loss is a multi-authored study of wartime Japanese Canadian confinement that draws from the memoirs of Kishizo Kimura, a Japanese-born man who immigrated to Canada in 1911. Kimura had an important impact on the...

Review by Christian Roy


Book Review

Not Fit to Stay: Public Health Panics and South Asian Exclusion

In the spring of 2018, hundreds of people gathered between city hall and the public library in downtown Bellingham, Washington, to witness the dedication of a 10-ton granite “Arch of Reconciliation,” a monument to and...

Review by Jennifer Seltz


Book Review

Ranch in the Slocan: A Biography of a Kootenay Farm, 1896 – 2017

Cole Harris’s Ranch in the Slocan: A Biography of a Kootenay Farm, 1896 – 2017 is delightful summer reading. It is, primarily, a history of the Harris family’s Bosun Ranch and a record of the lives of...

Review by Shirley McDonald


Book Review

Toshiko

I haven’t read a comic book since childhood, save for the Classics Comic version of “Romeo and Juliet,” which seemed a short-cut to studying that play in high school. Co-incidentally, Kluckner’s book, more properly described...

Review by Patricia Roy


Book Review

The Slocan History Series

          Edited by Cole Harris, the Slocan History Series began with four booklets that focus primarily on the mining “boom days” of the 1890s and their long-term effects on the region....

Review by Duff Sutherland


Book Review

Remembered in Bronze and Stone: Canada’s Great War Memorial Statuary

In the two decades following the Great War, Canadian sculptors, architects and stonemasons produced over four thousand war monuments in the form of plaques, shafts, crosses, obelisks, stelae and figurative sculptures. Some were paid for...

Review by Maria Tippett


Book Review

Gently to Nagasaki

Joy Kogawa’s place in literary history has been secure since 1981, when Obasan swayed more hearts and minds than art can generally hope to do. Told from the point of view of a six-year-old girl,...

Review by Susan Knutson


Book Review

The Salmon People

When The Salmon People was first published in 1967, commercial salmon fishing still sustained many coastal communities, although as Hugh McKervill pointed out then, there were plenty of signs that the resource was threatened. In...

Review by Kenneth Campbell


Book Review

A Taste of Haida Gwaii: Food Gathering and Feasting at the Edge of the World

There is an alternative out there to the globalized world of agribusiness, GMOs (genetically modified organisms), and processed packaged food, one based on harvesting and using local, especially wild, foods and re-weaving them into our...

Review by Nancy J. Turner


Book Review

Maritime Command Pacific: The Royal Canadian Navy’s West Coast Fleet in the Early Cold War

This welcome new study concerns the operations of Canada’s west coast fleet in the two decades after the Second World War. Soon after 1945, defence policy came to be dominated by Canada’s contributions to NATO...

Review by Jan Drent


Book Review

A Nation in Conflict: Canada and the Two World Wars

In the practice of military history, historians have tended to examine conflicts independently of each other, separating them out from other conflicts and from broader social currents and non-military events. Conflicts are often treated individually,...

Review by Jonathan Weier


Book Review

Landscapes of War and Memory: The Two World Wars in Canadian Literature and the Arts, 1977–2007

In Jack Hodgins’s Broken Ground (1998), memories of the Great War haunt the fictional community of Portuguese Creek on Vancouver Island, but what should be remembered of the horrors of France remains uncertain. The notebook...

Review by Nicholas Bradley


Book Review

Climber’s Paradise: Making Canada’s Mountain Parks, 1906-1974

Two powerful and iconic institutions can be found at the centre of most histories of tourism and recreation in the mountains of western Canada: the Canadian Pacific Railway and the agency known today as Parks...

Review by Ben Bradley


Book Review

Jeff Wall: North & West

There are many reasons why Jeff Wall’s photographs speak to so many people. They celebrate the ordinary. They are non-descriptive. And they draw on a compositional vocabulary — from the woodcuts of the Japanese master...

Review by Maria Tippett