We acknowledge that we live and work on unceded Indigenous territories and we thank the Musqueam, Squamish and Tsleil-Waututh Nations for their hospitality.

Index

Results (565)

Book Review

A Missing Genocide and the Demonization of its Heroes

Tom Swanky’s self-published book A Missing Genocide and the Demonization of its Heroes brings into sharp focus the problems faced by historians steeped in a discipline that does not fully appreciate the culturally constructed limitations...

Review by Chris Arnett


Book Review

Vancouver Confidential

John Belshaw undertook the task of publishing a series of fifteen essays on Vancouver written by artists, journalists, and writers. There is no specific thesis in this collection, and no attempt to convey a specific...

Review by Marcel Martel


Book Review

Strange Visitors: Documents in Indigenous-Settler Relations in Canada from 1876

This is a timely, thoughtful, and useful collection of primary documents on the history of the interactions among Indigenous people, non-Indigenous people, and the Canadian state. Given what is currently available, it will be invaluable...

Review by Hamar Foster


Book Review

The Afterthought: West Coast Rock Posters and Recollections

Jerry Kruz’s beautifully illustrated autobiographical work provides an intriguing first hand glimpse of Vancouver psychedelic music scene. The book revolves around Kruz’s years as a concert promoter from 1966 to 1969. Although it briefly describes...

Review by Henry Trim


Book Review

Closing Time: Prohibition, Rum-Runners, and Border Wars

The prohibition era has attracted much interest for generations. The American story — undoubtedly because of the violence, criminal involvement, and Hollywood exposure — has always overshadowed the somewhat milder, more complicated, and less linear...

Review by Wayne Norton


Book Review

Rebel Youth: 1960s Labour Unrest, Young Workers, and New Leftists in English Canada

With Rebel Youth, Ian Milligan hearkens back to the political youth movements that went to the barricades, the conferences, and the picket lines in the 1960s, and in the process historicizes the events and people...

Review by Ron Verzuh


Book Review

No One to Tell: Breaking My Silence on Life in the RCMP

Like all new recruits graduating from the Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP) training academy in 1991, Janet Merlo was looking forward to getting to work at her first posting in Nanaimo, British Columbia. It was...

Review by Bonnie Reilly Schmidt


Book Review

Rufus: The Life of the Canadian Journalist who Interviewed Hitler

Colin Castle has undertaken a labour of love. The retired schoolteacher spent four years researching, transcribing, and writing the story of newspaperman Lukin “Rufus” Johnston. The self-described “history buff” (xvii) married Val Johnston, the granddaughter...

Review by Bruce Hodding


Book Review

We Go Far Back In Time: The Letters of Earle Birney and Al Purdy, 1947-1987

Nicholas Bradley is to be commended for this edited collection of Earle Birney and Al Purdy’s correspondence. As might be expected from two epic figures of Canadian literature who lived and worked in British Columbia,...

Review by James Gifford


Book Review

Historical GIS Research in Canada

This is a wonderful collection of thirteen essays, nine co-authored (twenty-seven authors all told), written by historians, geographers, librarians, archivists, cartographers, environmental scientists, and an architect, many of them acknowledging by name the other research...

Review by Deryck Holdsworth


Book Review

Boundless Optimism: Richard McBride’s British Columbia

Patricia E. Roy’s Boundless Optimism: Richard McBride’s British Columbia examines the political career of one of the province’s most significant premiers. Born in New Westminster in 1870 and educated at New Westminster High School and...

Review by Duff Sutherland


Book Review

Welcome to Resisterville: American Dissidents in British Columbia

Just about every kid who grew up in British Columbia in the 1980s had a friend (or a friend of a friend) whose parents were American immigrants. Their parents usually arrived in the province sometime...

Review by Sean Kheraj


Book Review

Lives Lived West of the Divide: A Biographical Dictionary of Fur Traders Working West of the Rockies, 1793-1858 Volumes 1-3

In 1793 Alexander Mackenzie crossed the continent in search of a route to the Pacific for the North West Company trade. He reached the Pacific at Dean Channel but failed to find a viable trade...

Review by Nancy Marguerite Anderson


Book Review

Canoe Crossings: Understanding the Craft That Helped Shape British Columbia

A devoted canoeist, Sanford Osler has used his wide experience with many forms of paddle-craft to write a comprehensive and well-informed review of canoeing and kayaking in British Columbia. His up-to-date and very readable presentation...

Review by Alan Hoover


Book Review

Salmonbellies vs. The World: The Story of the Most Famous Team in Lacrosse & Their Greatest Rivals

In this well-researched, beautifully illustrated book W.B. MacDonald tells the story of the Salmonbellies from their founding to the present, and he does much more. He traces the evolution of lacrosse in the province, beginning...

Review by Eric Sager


Book Review

Enlightened Zeal: The Hudson’s Bay Company and Scientific Networks, 1670–1870

A Strange and Dangerovs Voyage (1633) was published by command of King Charles I after Thomas James (c.1593-1635) returned from overwintering in James Bay. Dead by 1635, James had nothing to do with the founding...

Review by I.S. MacLaren


Book Review

Mac-Pap: Memoir of a Canadian in the Spanish Civil War

I first read Mac-Pap: Memoir of a Canadian in the Spanish Civil War in manuscript form thanks to the invaluable labour-related holdings of the Special Collections Division at UBC Library. While I don’t think it...

Review by Todd McCallum


Book Review

Conversations with a Dead Man: The Legacy of Duncan Campbell Scott

Mark Abley was understandably alarmed when an impeccably dressed apparition appeared in his living room claiming to be Duncan Campbell Scott. An accomplished and respected poet, Scott spent over fifty years working in Canada’s Department of...

Review by Keith D. Smith