We acknowledge that we live and work on unceded Indigenous territories and we thank the Musqueam, Squamish and Tsleil-Waututh Nations for their hospitality.

Index

Results (173)

Book Review

Whose Culture Is It, Anyway? Community Engagement in Small Cities

Whose Culture Is It, Anyway? addresses important questions about the contribution of arts and culture in small and medium sized cities and the ethos and ethics of supporting cultural development in these environments. Small and...

Review by Eric Brown


Book Review

The Bastard of Fort Stikine: The Hudson’s Bay Company and the Murder of John McLoughlin, Jr.

  During his round-the-world voyage in 1842, Hudson’s Bay Company (HBC) Governor George Simpson arrived at Fort Stikine and discovered that chief trader John McLoughlin Jr. had been killed. Two recent books discuss this event....

Review by Corey Larson


Book Review

Islands’ Spirit Rising: Reclaiming the Forests of Haida Gwaii

In Islands’ Spirit Rising: Reclaiming the Forests of Haida Gwaii, Louise Takeda challenges the dominant epistemological perspective on the politics of BC resource management in order to “[further] political and social justice” and “give back”...

Review by James Davey


Book Review

From the West Coast to the Western Front: British Columbians and the Great War

  When Mark Forsythe, host of CBC Radio’s mid-day show, BC Almanac, and journalist-producer Greg Dickson discovered that they were both involved in a personal quest to learn about great-uncles and grandfathers who had served...

Review by James Wood


Book Review

From Classroom to Battlefield: Victoria High School and the First World War

In his portrait of Victoria High School (VHS), Barry Gough has created a vivid microcosm of the First World War’s impact on Canadians. As one of Canada’s foremost historians, Gough brings a special authenticity to...

Review by James Wood


Book Review

Vancouver Confidential

John Belshaw undertook the task of publishing a series of fifteen essays on Vancouver written by artists, journalists, and writers. There is no specific thesis in this collection, and no attempt to convey a specific...

Review by Marcel Martel


Book Review

We Go Far Back In Time: The Letters of Earle Birney and Al Purdy, 1947-1987

Nicholas Bradley is to be commended for this edited collection of Earle Birney and Al Purdy’s correspondence. As might be expected from two epic figures of Canadian literature who lived and worked in British Columbia,...

Review by James Gifford


Book Review

Boundless Optimism: Richard McBride’s British Columbia

Patricia E. Roy’s Boundless Optimism: Richard McBride’s British Columbia examines the political career of one of the province’s most significant premiers. Born in New Westminster in 1870 and educated at New Westminster High School and...

Review by Duff Sutherland


Book Review

Canoe Crossings: Understanding the Craft That Helped Shape British Columbia

A devoted canoeist, Sanford Osler has used his wide experience with many forms of paddle-craft to write a comprehensive and well-informed review of canoeing and kayaking in British Columbia. His up-to-date and very readable presentation...

Review by Alan Hoover


Book Review

Enlightened Zeal: The Hudson’s Bay Company and Scientific Networks, 1670–1870

A Strange and Dangerovs Voyage (1633) was published by command of King Charles I after Thomas James (c.1593-1635) returned from overwintering in James Bay. Dead by 1635, James had nothing to do with the founding...

Review by I.S. MacLaren


Book Review

Catching the Torch: Contemporary Canadian Literary Responses to World War I

Neta Gordon’s Catching the Torch: Contemporary Canadian Literary Responses to World War I is a firmly contemporary study of the notion of the Great War in modern memory: that is, the First World War’s imaginative...

Review by James Gifford


Book Review

This Day in Vancouver

       There are some stories about Vancouver that bear retelling. Take the tale of Theodore Ludgate, an American capitalist in the lumber trade who arrived in the city around 1899 with a lease for the...

Review by John Belshaw


Book Review

The Ones Who Have to Pay: The Soldiers-Poets of Victoria BC in the Great War 1914-1918

Robert Ratcliffe Taylor’s study of the soldier-poets of the First World War is useful for scholarship and is approachable by a casual reader. Although the tone of this review must be critical, the utility and...

Review by James Gifford


Book Review

The Canadian Rangers: A Living History

Today the Canadian Rangers are noted as a unique unit within the Canadian Armed Forces (CAF), created to establish a military presence in remote coastal and northern regions by utilizing mainly Aboriginal volunteers. Lackenbauer’s extensive...

Review by James Wood


Book Review

For King and Country: 150 Years of the Royal Westminster Regiment

The setting sun of the British Columbia flag provides a fitting background for the regimental colours of the Royal Westminster Regiment. Authorized in 1863 by Governor James Douglas as the New Westminster Volunteer Rifles, in...

Review by James Wood


Book Review

Charles Edenshaw

This is the catalogue for the Vancouver Art Gallery’s Charles Edenshaw exhibition. Curated and edited by Robin K. Wright, Curator of Native American Art and Director of the Bill Holm Center for the Study of...

Review by Martha Black


Book Review

Desiring Canada: CBC Contests, Hockey Violence, and Other Stately Pleasures

What kind of community turns to a coffee shop for meaning? In what country would a search for Seven Wonders collapse into ironic parody? What kind of imagined community cherishes national ownership of a professional...

Review by Eric Sager