We acknowledge that we live and work on unceded Indigenous territories and we thank the Musqueam, Squamish and Tsleil-Waututh Nations for their hospitality.

Index

Results (447)

Exhibition, Film, and New Media Review

Screen Sovereignty: Indigenous Matriarch 4 Articulating the Future of Indigenous VR

 Indigenous matriarchs are changing the culture of the technology industry through virtual reality (VR). Indigenous Matriarch 4 (IM4) is the first Indigenous virtual reality media lab and is situated on the West Coast. Currently, it...

Review by Courteney Morin


new media technology virtual reality aboriginal art

Exhibition, Film, and New Media Review

In/consequential Relationships: Refusing Colonial Ethics of Engagement in Yuxweluptun’s Inherent Rights, Vision Rights

On the closing day of the Museum of Anthropology’s Unceded Territories exhibit of Lawrence Paul Yuxweluptun’s art, crowds formed queues long enough to snake through the halls and to pack the exhibit space for the...

Review by Sarah King


Yuxweluptun Lawrence Paul

Exhibition, Film, and New Media Review

RAVEN (De)Briefs Podcast: Indigenous Law in Action

Season one of the RAVEN (De)Briefs podcast series is a refreshing Indigenization of the traditional podcast format in that it evokes everyday kitchen table conversations among relatives, combined with sonic, Indigenous documentary. Exploring contemporary environmental...

Review by Lydia Toorenburgh


colonialism Delgamuukw v. BC Indigenous Indigenous rights treaties land claims law

Exhibition, Film, and New Media Review

A Tradition of Evolution: The Vancouver Indigenous Media Arts Festival

Vancouver Indigenous Media Arts Festival: Vancouver, British Columbia, 25-26 May 2017. The festival featured film and new media presentations, including a “Turtle Island Shorts” program (May 26); VR and augmented reality presentations (May 27); and...

Review by Carleigh Baker


aboriginal art

Exhibition, Film, and New Media Review

When the City Sleeps, We Dream of Disruption: A Review of Lisa Jackson’s Transmissions Exhibition

Lisa Jackson’s exhibition entitled Transmissions premiered at the Simon Fraser University’s Vancouver campus from 6–28 September 2019. This new body of work weaves interdisciplinary themes regarding society, nature, Indigenous languages, and ecological futures. Lisa Jackson is Anishinaabe from the Aamjiwnaang First Nation and...

Review by Karlene Harvey


Aboriginal languages environment urbanization

Exhibition, Film, and New Media Review

Now Is the Time

In the extraordinary short film Now Is the Time, Haida filmmaker Christopher Auchter brings to the screen a moving story of renewal through the restoration and re-editing of footage from the National Film Board of...

Review by Kristin L. Dowell


museums repatriation aboriginal self government colonialism settler colonialism aboriginal art aboriginal rights Haida Indigenous worlds

Exhibition, Film, and New Media Review

Konelīne: our land beautiful

As the language and culture director for the Tahltan Nation and a Tahltan academic, I believe giving voice to our people is crucial. Until recent times, the academy has privileged the voices of settlers and...

Review by Matthew Gartner


Exhibition, Film, and New Media Review

Reflexive Anthropology on Display: Franz Boas, George Hunt, and the Co-Production of Ethnographic Knowledge

  A portion of an 1897 letter from Franz Boas to Kwagu’ł Chiefs, reproduced in English and Kwak’wala, opens The Story Box: Franz Boas, George Hunt and the Making of Anthropology, an exhibition on view...

Review by Christopher T. Green


Kwakwaka'wakw U'mista Cultural Centre Boas Franz George Hunt

Exhibition, Film, and New Media Review

The Body Remembers When the World Broke Open 

Though many will recognize Elle-Máijá Tailfeathers for her remarkable body of short and documentary films (Bloodland [2011], A Red Girl’s Reasoning [2012], Bihttoš [2014], cəsnaʔəm, the city before the city [2017]), The Body Remembers When the World Broke Open (2019)...

Review by Karrmen Crey


Book Review

Go Do Some Great Thing: The Black Pioneers of British Columbia

The revised third edition of Kilian Crawford’s ground-breaking book on BC’s Black pioneers is timely and essential reading. It is a critical corrective to omissions and erasure in both academic histories and in popular understandings,...

Review by Georgia Sitara


this space here

In Plain Sight: Addressing Indigenous-specific Racism and Discrimination in BC Health Care

By Mary Ellen Turpel-Lafond (Aki-kwe), Harmony Johnson (sɛƛakəs)


Exhibition, Film, and New Media Review

The Transect Podcast Review

The world of British Columbian archaeology is, to most, unknown and inaccessible. This is a shame, particularly in a province whose settler population has such a poor grasp of its long human history. Archaeology is...

Review by Eric Simons


Exhibition, Film, and New Media Review

Not your usual science: a Future Ecologies Podcast Review

Future Ecologies is not your typical science podcast. Strongly reminiscent of Radiolab (2002–), the renowned WNYC series from the “golden age” of podcasting (Barry 2015), Future Ecologies investigates “the shape of our world,” or the...

Review by Milena Droumeva


Exhibition, Film, and New Media Review

Vancouver: No Fixed Address

What stays with you after watching Charles Wilkinson’s new documentary, Vancouver: No Fixed Address, is its beautiful cinematography. Vancouver’s ideal location at the intersection of the ocean, the mountains, and the sky is captured brilliantly: every shot...

Review by Patricia Wood


Exhibition, Film, and New Media Review

Is the World Wonderful? On Judy Chartrand’s What a Wonderful World

Judy Chartrand: What a Wonderful World on view at the Bill Reid Gallery of Northwest Coast Art, Vancouver, BC, 19 October 2016 – 26 March 2017. Admittedly, I was confused about where the permanent collection...

Review by Allison Adler


art

Book Review

Paradise Won: The Struggle to Create Gwaii Haanas National Park Reserve

Knowing that Paradise Won: The Struggle to Create Gwaii Haanas National Park Reserve would end in the establishment of a park offers no relief from the sense of urgency that reading the book elicits. Usually,...

Review by Madison Helsop


Book Review

Victoria Unbuttoned: A Red-Light History of BC’s Capital City

Linda J. Eversole’s first book, Stella: Unrepentant Madam, written in 2005, was praised for its academic value and readability.   The author continues her exploration of women in the sex trade with Victoria Unbuttoned, profiling ten...

Review by Janet Nicol


Book Review

Landscapes of Injustice: A New Perspective on the Internment and Dispossession of Japanese Canadians

In historical memory, the forced confinement and exclusion of 22,000 Japanese Canadians from 1942 to 1949 remains one of the darkest and, unfortunately, least understood chapters in Canadian history. Although the story has been told...

Review by Jonathan van Harmelen