We acknowledge that we live and work on unceded Indigenous territories and we thank the Musqueam, Squamish and Tsleil-Waututh Nations for their hospitality.

Index

Results (317)

Book Review

The Answer is Still No: Voices of Pipeline Resistance

The Answer is Still No is a disparate collection of voices united in opposition to Enbridge’s Northern Gateway Pipelines: First Nations activists and hereditary chiefs, members of the environmental movement establishment and those self-consciously on...

Review by Jonathan Peyton


Book Review

The Gold Will Speak For Itself: Peter Leech and Leechtown

Vancouver Island has a distinctive personality among the regions of British Columbia, one that has been shaped in complex ways by geography and history. The books reviewed here vary in their candlepower, but all of...

Review by Patrick Dunae


Book Review

The First Nations of British Columbia: An Anthropological Overview. Third Edition

Despite its slim size (the main body of text is only 117 pages), The First Nations of British Columbia: An Anthropological Overview is a useful primer for those hoping to learn the basic issues relevant...

Review by Christine Elsey


Book Review

The Sea Among Us: The Amazing Strait of Georgia

Much of my critique of Beamish and McFarlane’s The Sea Among Us is that familiar reviewer’s refrain: they didn’t write the book that I would have. With the luxury of a dozen different writers, I...

Review by Howard Stewart


Book Review

He Moved a Mountain: The Life of Frank Calder and the Nisga’a Land Claims Award

Like others over the course of history who have influenced fundamental human rights change, Frank Arthur Calder seems to have been born to that grand purpose. Calder’s Nisga’a elders accurately foresaw that he was destined...

Review by Katherine Palmer Gordon


Book Review

“Metis:” Race, Recognition, and the Struggle for Indigenous Peoplehood

In “Métis,” Chris Andersen highlights the widespread marginalization of Métis peoples by taking to task the continued racialization of the term “Métis.” Systematically unpacking the ways in which the word “Métis” has been misrecognized and...

Review by Gabrielle Legault


Book Review

Strange Visitors: Documents in Indigenous-Settler Relations in Canada from 1876

This is a timely, thoughtful, and useful collection of primary documents on the history of the interactions among Indigenous people, non-Indigenous people, and the Canadian state. Given what is currently available, it will be invaluable...

Review by Hamar Foster


Book Review

Xweliqwiya: The Life of a Stó:lō Matriarch

Xweliqwiya is the name carried by Rena Point Bolton among the Steqó:ye Wolf People. It marks an indelible position in the Xwélmexw (Stó:lō) world, relating her to a particular geography, linking her to mythological narratives,...

Review by Leslie Robertson


Book Review

From the Hands of a Weaver: Olympic Peninsula Basketry through Time

This book tells the story of the many roles of basketry in the lives of the First Peoples of Washington’s Olympic Peninsula and of the diverse styles and materials used by the weavers, mainly women....

Review by Nancy J. Turner


Book Review

Historical GIS Research in Canada

This is a wonderful collection of thirteen essays, nine co-authored (twenty-seven authors all told), written by historians, geographers, librarians, archivists, cartographers, environmental scientists, and an architect, many of them acknowledging by name the other research...

Review by Deryck Holdsworth


Book Review

Surveying Southern British Columbia: A Photojournal of Frank Swannell, 1901-07

When the Vancouver convention centre was completed in 2009, a series of interpretive panels describing the history of British Columbia were placed along the waterfront promenade. Featured among these panels is the story of “BC’s...

Review by Kelly Black


Book Review

Conversations with a Dead Man: The Legacy of Duncan Campbell Scott

Mark Abley was understandably alarmed when an impeccably dressed apparition appeared in his living room claiming to be Duncan Campbell Scott. An accomplished and respected poet, Scott spent over fifty years working in Canada’s Department of...

Review by Keith D. Smith


Book Review

Chinuk Wawa: Kakwa nsayka ulman-tilixam ɬaska munk-kəmtəks nsayka/As Our Elders Teach Us To Speak It

In an obscure 1978 dissertation, a linguist named Samuel Johnson demonstrated that most of the countless Chinook Jargon lexica compiled over two hundred years form a few distinct lineages.[1] Joining the ranks of definitive dictionaries...

Review by Dave Robertson