We acknowledge that we live and work on unceded Indigenous territories and we thank the Musqueam, Squamish and Tsleil-Waututh Nations for their hospitality.

Index

Results (270)

Book Review

Surveying Southern British Columbia: A Photojournal of Frank Swannell, 1901-07

When the Vancouver convention centre was completed in 2009, a series of interpretive panels describing the history of British Columbia were placed along the waterfront promenade. Featured among these panels is the story of “BC’s...

Review by Kelly Black


Book Review

Historical GIS Research in Canada

This is a wonderful collection of thirteen essays, nine co-authored (twenty-seven authors all told), written by historians, geographers, librarians, archivists, cartographers, environmental scientists, and an architect, many of them acknowledging by name the other research...

Review by Deryck Holdsworth


Book Review

Klallam Dictionary

Timothy Montler’s Klallam Dictionary is much more than a listing of words in Klallam and English. It is a beautiful, solid volume of information that has potential to be useful to a wide range of...

Review by Suzanne Urbanczyk


Book Review

The Afterthought: West Coast Rock Posters and Recollections

Jerry Kruz’s beautifully illustrated autobiographical work provides an intriguing first hand glimpse of Vancouver psychedelic music scene. The book revolves around Kruz’s years as a concert promoter from 1966 to 1969. Although it briefly describes...

Review by Henry Trim


Book Review

Ever-Changing Sky: Doris Lee’s Journey from Schoolteacher to Cariboo Rancher

Doris Lee’s memoir, Ever-Changing Sky, offers readers an account of the nearly twenty years she and her husband spent as owner/operators of Big Lake Ranch, deep in the heart of British Columbia’s Cariboo country. Freshly...

Review by Megan Prins


Book Review

The Gold Will Speak For Itself: Peter Leech and Leechtown

Vancouver Island has a distinctive personality among the regions of British Columbia, one that has been shaped in complex ways by geography and history. The books reviewed here vary in their candlepower, but all of...

Review by Patrick Dunae


Book Review

Blockades or Breakthroughs?: Aboriginal Peoples Confront the Canadian State

Canada is no stranger to Aboriginal direct action: “Oka, Ipperwash, Caledonia. Blockades, masked warriors, police snipers” (3). Citing this excerpt from the 2006 report of Standing Senate Committee on Aboriginal peoples to introduce the collection...

Review by Sarah Nickel


Book Review

Maps and Memes: Redrawing Culture, Place and Identity in Indigenous Communities

In this innovative and important book, Gwilyn Eades, a geographer from Terrace, undertakes a kaleidoscopic investigation of the significance of maps, cartography, contemporary geo-coding technologies (GIS, GPS, and Google Earth), and questions of spatial cognition...

Review by Daniel Clayton


Book Review

Great Fortune Dream: The Struggles and Triumphs of Chinese Settlers in Canada, 1858-1966

David Chuenyan Lai and Ding Guo’s Great Fortune Dream is a comprehensive history of the Chinese in Canada, from early settlement to the 1960s. While much has been written on the subject, there have been...

Review by LiLynn Wan


Book Review

The Royal Fjord: Memories of Jervis Inlet

In The Royal Fjord, Ray Phillips, a long-time resident of the Sunshine Coast, finishes a job his late father started. It is, says Phillips, a book of “many anecdotes [and other stories that] tell some...

Review by Howard Stewart


Book Review

Gently to Nagasaki

Joy Kogawa’s place in literary history has been secure since 1981, when Obasan swayed more hearts and minds than art can generally hope to do. Told from the point of view of a six-year-old girl,...

Review by Susan Knutson


Book Review

The Comox Valley: Courtnay, Comox, Cumberland, and Area

In the publisher’s promotional sheet, this attractive book is described as “an intimate portrait of an incredibly beautiful and special place.” This sense of affection for the region comes across strongly in the course of...

Review by Jamie Morton


Book Review

Surveying the Great Divide: The Alberta/BC Boundary Survey, 1913-1917

Released in 2017 to coincide with national ‘Canada 150’ celebrations, Jay Sherwood’s Surveying the Great Divide also affords an opportunity to reflect on a period of productive inter-provincial cooperation a century ago, at a moment...

Review by Jason Grek-Martin


Book Review

Not My Fate: The Story of a Nisga’a Survivor

Not My Fate: The Story of a Nisga’a Survivor is Janet Romain’s account of the life of her friend and fellow northerner, Josephine Caplin.[1]  Jo was born in Smithers to a Nisga’a mother and non-Aboriginal...

Review by Carole Blackburn


Book Review

The Oil Man and the Sea: Navigating the Northern Gateway

This book, aptly titled The Oil Man and the Sea, is about the current threat posed by the proposed Enbridge Northern Gateway pipeline to the ecosystems and people of the Great Bear Rainforest. This region,...

Review by Maggie Low


Book Review

Whitewater Devils: Adventure on Wild Waters

  With Whitewater Devils, retired forestry worker Jack Boudreau has written his eighth book of adventurous tales. Set mostly in British Columbia, Whitewater Devils – while not his best work – is an interesting complement...

Review by Anthony Dalton


Book Review

Dalton’s Gold Rush Trail: Exploring the Route of the Klondike Cattle Drives

Although the Chilkoot Trail is the most famous trail to the Klondike, there were a wide variety of other routes that gold seekers used to reach the interior of the Yukon between 1896 and 1900....

Review by Charlene Porsild


Book Review

Dream City: Vancouver and the Global Imagination

Dream City. The title is captivating, but what does it mean? Lance Berelowitz’s book about changes in the urban design and planning of Vancouver opens and closes by briefly discussing the phrase “dream city,” but...

Review by Lawrence McCann


Book Review

Tsimshian Treasures: The Remarkable Journey of the Dundas Collection

In October 1863, the Reverend Robert J. Dundas of Scotland travelled up the coast from Victoria to Old Metlakatla, near Prince Rupert. There, he acquired seventy-seven “ceremonial objects” from the Anglican evangelical lay minister William...

Review by Karen Duffek