We acknowledge that we live and work on unceded Indigenous territories and we thank the Musqueam, Squamish and Tsleil-Waututh Nations for their hospitality.

Index

Results (277)

Book Review

Growing Up Weird: A Memoir of an Oak Bay Childhood

In Growing Up Weird: A Memoir of an Oak Bay Childhood, author Liz Maxwell Forbes provides a very personal account of childhood in a British Columbia community in the 1940s and 1950s. Drawing from her...

Review by Caroline Duncan


Book Review

Gently to Nagasaki

Joy Kogawa’s place in literary history has been secure since 1981, when Obasan swayed more hearts and minds than art can generally hope to do. Told from the point of view of a six-year-old girl,...

Review by Susan Knutson


Book Review

Edmonton House Journals, Correspondence and Reports: 1806-1821

This volume assembles the remaining records (with the exception of accounts) produced between 1806 and 1821 at Edmonton House, the Saskatchewan District headquarters of the Hudson’s Bay Company. This period starts with the 1806 Lewis...

Review by Jamie Morton


Book Review

Soviet Princeton: Slim Evans and the 1932-33 Miners’ Strike

Arthur “Slim” Evans has long been a notable figure in Canadian labour history, most often associated with the famed On-to-Ottawa Trek that he led in 1935 in an effort to improve conditions in the relief...

Review by Ron Verzuh


Book Review

A Rock Fell on the Moon: Dad and the Great Yukon Silver Ore Heist

On the surface, Alicia Priest’s memoir A Rock Fell on the Moon: Dad and the Great Yukon Silver Ore Heist is a well-researched and well-written account of Gerald H. Priest’s attempt to steal silver ore...

Review by Katharine Rollwagen


Book Review

The Business of Power: Hydroelectricity in Southeastern British Columbia, 1897-1997

When Jeremy Mouat’s The Business of Power first came out in 1997, both Cominco and West Kootenay Power and Light, the main corporate subjects of Mouat’s book (the latter of which commissioned it), had recently...

Review by Phillip Van Huizen


Book Review

The Salish Sea: Jewel of the Pacific Northwest

Audrey DeLella Benedict and Joseph Gaydos’s book about the Salish Sea, like Beamish and McFarlane’s recent tome on the Strait of Georgia (or North Salish Sea), The Sea Among Us, is a gorgeously illustrated and...

Review by Howard Stewart


Book Review

Sonia: The Life of Bohemian, Rancher and Artist Sonia Cornwall, 1919-2006

Challenged to name women artists of British Columbia of the twentieth century, most people would stop at Emily Carr. While the list of both First Nations and settler women artists of British Columbia is impressively...

Review by Kerry Mason


Book Review

Listening for the Heartbeat of Being: The Arts of Robert Bringhurst

Poet Robert Bringhurst has been just on the periphery of my attention for many years, and it seems I’ve been in good company. Although he has made a name for himself in some circles (he...

Review by Ceilidh Hart


Book Review

A Taste of Haida Gwaii: Food Gathering and Feasting at the Edge of the World

There is an alternative out there to the globalized world of agribusiness, GMOs (genetically modified organisms), and processed packaged food, one based on harvesting and using local, especially wild, foods and re-weaving them into our...

Review by Nancy J. Turner


Book Review

Canadian Pacific: The Golden Age of Travel

The Canadian Pacific Railway’s travel literature boasts marvellous scenery, adventure, and extravagance. “You shall see mighty rivers, vast forest, boundless plains, stupendous mountains and wonders innumerable, and you shall see in all in comfort, nay...

Review by Heather Longworth Sjoblom


Book Review

Watershed Moments: A Pictorial History of Courtenay and District

Those who would wish to time-travel to the Comox Valley of the First World War era need only to walk the streets of today’s Courtenay downtown core. There they will encounter numerous large publicly-displayed photographs...

Review by Dan Hinman-Smith


Book Review

The Literary Storefront: The Glory Years: Vancouver’s Literary Centre 1978-1985

Few bookstores figure prominently in modern literary history. Shakespeare and Company in Paris, once frequented by Joyce, Stein, Fitzgerald, and Hemingway, and City Lights in San Francisco, made famous by Ginsberg and Kerouac, are shrines...

Review by Nicholas Bradley


Book Review

Maps and Memes: Redrawing Culture, Place and Identity in Indigenous Communities

In this innovative and important book, Gwilyn Eades, a geographer from Terrace, undertakes a kaleidoscopic investigation of the significance of maps, cartography, contemporary geo-coding technologies (GIS, GPS, and Google Earth), and questions of spatial cognition...

Review by Daniel Clayton


Book Review

Blockades or Breakthroughs?: Aboriginal Peoples Confront the Canadian State

Canada is no stranger to Aboriginal direct action: “Oka, Ipperwash, Caledonia. Blockades, masked warriors, police snipers” (3). Citing this excerpt from the 2006 report of Standing Senate Committee on Aboriginal peoples to introduce the collection...

Review by Sarah Nickel


Book Review

The Final Report of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada, Volumes 1-6

A portion of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission’s (TRC) mandate laid out in Schedule N to the Indian Residential Schools Settlement Agreement [IRSSA] of 2006 said that the Commission was to “Produce and submit to...

Review by J.R. Miller


Book Review

From the Forest to the Sea: Emily Carr in British Columbia

Over sixty years after her death, Emily Carr has hit the international scene. It began in June 2012 when seven of her paintings were featured in Kassell, Germany’s prestigious Documenta, an art fair that showcases...

Review by Maria Tippett


Book Review

Allied Power: Mobilizing Hydro-electricity during Canada’s Second World War

In Allied Power, Matthew Evenden expertly demonstrates how private and public power commissions and corporations throughout Canada expanded hydro-electric capacity in response to the ballooning demands for power and production during the Second World War....

Review by Jonathan McQuarrie