We acknowledge that we live and work on unceded Indigenous territories and we thank the Musqueam, Squamish and Tsleil-Waututh Nations for their hospitality.

Index

Results (86)

Review

Profit and Ambition, The North West Company and the Fur Trade 1779-1821

This booklet was published to accompany the Canadian Museum of Civilization’s current exhibition (by the same name), which ends 6 February 2011. It is more than just a catalogue because, in addition to the superb...

Review by Marie Elliott


Review

Company, Crown and Colony: The Hudson’s Bay Company and Territorial Endeavour in Western Canada

In essence, this is a study of governorship, or governorships — Richard Blanshard to Frederick Seymour, with Sir James Douglas as the centrepiece of description. The addition of many charts and tables lend it an...

Review by Barry Gough


Review

Finding a Way to the Heart: Feminist Writings on Aboriginal and Women’s History in Canada

As recently as forty years ago, Sylvia Van Kirk sat in the Hudson’s Bay Company Archives in London and asked a completely new question of the business papers of this iconic and long-standing company: “Where...

Review by Frieda Klippenstein


Review

Undelievered Letters to Hudson’s Bay Company Men on the Northwest Coast of America, 1830-57

In Undelivered Letters, editors Judith Hudson Beattie and Helen M. Buss provide a voice for those North American fur trade people usually thought to be voiceless. This publication of over 200 undelivered letters to men who...

Review by Carolyn Podruchny


Review

The Collector: David Douglas and the Natural History of the Northwest

The Horticultural Society of London demanded that David Douglas (1799-1834), their employee and North American plant hunter, keep a meticulous journal of his travels. Certainly a better field naturalist than author, Douglas refused to let...

Review by David Brownstein


Review

Writing British Columbia History, 1784-1958

Historiography may seem like a dry, pedantic exercise that would only attract a handful of readers. Add to that the seeming lack of history that the subject of British Columbia suggests. But a recent addition...

Review by Ken Favrholdt


Review

More English than the English: A Very Social History of Victoria

  In “Tracing the Fortunes of Five Founding Families of Victoria” (BC Studies 115/116 1998/1999), Sylvia Van Kirk revealed the mixed cultural background of some of Victoria’s most important settler families (the Douglases, Tods, Works,...

Review by Terry Reksten


Review

A Modern Life: Art and Design in British Columbia, 1945-1960

An early and still not inappropriate epithet for Vancouver is Terminal City. This epithet denotes not only a peripheral cultural as well as a geographical location but also the city’s potential for development, despite its...

Review by Rhodri Windsor-Liscombe


Review

The Bastard of Fort Stikine: The Hudson’s Bay Company and the Murder of John McLoughlin, Jr.

  During his round-the-world voyage in 1842, Hudson’s Bay Company (HBC) Governor George Simpson arrived at Fort Stikine and discovered that chief trader John McLoughlin Jr. had been killed. Two recent books discuss this event....

Review by Corey Larson


Review

The Elusive Mr. Pond: The Soldier, Fur Trader and Explorer who Opened the Northwest

Barry Gough has masterfully grappled with the challenge of interpreting an important figure in the Canadian fur trade in his book, The Elusive Mr. Pond: The Soldier, Fur Trader and Explorer who Opened the Northwest....

Review by George Colpitts


Review

Recollecting: Lives of Aboriginal Women of the Canadian Northwest and Borderlands

This multiple award-winning collection considers Aboriginal women through a regional approach. Its essays contribute to several intersecting historiographies: women’s and gender histories, Aboriginal women’s history, and biography. Beyond these, the works are unified through their...

Review by Susan Neylan


Review

Native Peoples and Water Rights: Irrigation, Dams, and the Law in Western Canada

Making the jump from studies of static property such as land to the fluid resource of water, Kenichi Matsui’s Native Peoples and Water Rights explores new territory by examining the intersection of Aboriginal rights and...

Review by Jenny Clayton


Review

Canada’s Entrepreneurs: From the Fur Trade to the 1929 Stock Market Crash: Portraits from the Dictionary of Canadian Biography.

The editors of Canada’s Entrepreneurs assembled this book to appeal to a wide variety of Canadian readers (including non-academics), to inspire instructors to incorporate more business history into their courses, and to showcase the Dictionary...

Review by Ted Binnema


Review

Civilizing the Wilderness: Culture and Nature in Pre-Confederation Canada and Rupert’s Land

  Newcomers to Canada and Rupert’s Land in the mid-nineteenth century brought with them an assortment of cultural baggage. A. A. den Otter reveals that the twinned concepts of “civilization” and “wilderness” formed the dominant...

Review by Jonathan Clapperton


Review

Oregon’s Promise: An Interpretive History

WHY SHOULD BC Studies review a history of the State of Oregon, situated in another country and some 300 kilometres to the south? For many reasons. Our province and Oregon lie in a single economic-environmental...

Review by Roderick Barman


Review

Lives Lived West of the Divide: A Biographical Dictionary of Fur Traders Working West of the Rockies, 1793-1858 Volumes 1-3

In 1793 Alexander Mackenzie crossed the continent in search of a route to the Pacific for the North West Company trade. He reached the Pacific at Dean Channel but failed to find a viable trade...

Review by Nancy Marguerite Anderson