We acknowledge that we live and work on unceded Indigenous territories and we thank the Musqueam, Squamish and Tsleil-Waututh Nations for their hospitality.

Index

Results (58)

Book Review

Vancouverism

It’s best to start any study with a clear, concise, and irrefutable sentence. But “Vancouver is a place” is taking that axiom too far. And, as anyone who knows horses will tell you, a place...

Review by John Douglas Belshaw


Book Review

Children of the Kootenays: Memories of Mining Towns

Shirley D. Stainton’s Children of the Kootenays: Memories of Mining Towns describes her own and her brother Ray’s childhoods in West Kootenay mining communities during the 1930s and 1940s. Stainton’s father, Lee Hall, was a cook...

Review by Duff Sutherland


Book Review

Trail North: The Okanagan Trail of 1858-68 and Its Origins in British Columbia and Washington

In Trail North, Ken Mather directs our attention to a relatively forgotten part of British Columbian history: the trails linking the interior of British Columbia to the Columbia Plateau of Washington and their contribution to...

Review by Christopher Herbert


Book Review

Beyond Mile Zero: The Vanishing Alaska Highway Lodge Community

The Alaska Highway runs from Dawson Creek, British Columbia, to Delta Junction, Alaska. Built by the American military for defense purposes during the Second World War, it was opened to the public in 1948 and...

Review by Steve Penfold


Book Review

They Called Me Number One: Secrets and Survival at an Indian Residential School

Bev Sellars’s bestselling memoir, They Called Me Number One, is a personal account of an important part of the colonial history of British Columbia told from a specific region in the province (Cariboo) and from...

Review by Jay Lewyn


Book Review

Landscapes of War and Memory: The Two World Wars in Canadian Literature and the Arts, 1977–2007

In Jack Hodgins’s Broken Ground (1998), memories of the Great War haunt the fictional community of Portuguese Creek on Vancouver Island, but what should be remembered of the horrors of France remains uncertain. The notebook...

Review by Nicholas Bradley


Book Review

The Gold Will Speak For Itself: Peter Leech and Leechtown

Vancouver Island has a distinctive personality among the regions of British Columbia, one that has been shaped in complex ways by geography and history. The books reviewed here vary in their candlepower, but all of...

Review by Patrick Dunae


Book Review

Canoe Crossings: Understanding the Craft That Helped Shape British Columbia

A devoted canoeist, Sanford Osler has used his wide experience with many forms of paddle-craft to write a comprehensive and well-informed review of canoeing and kayaking in British Columbia. His up-to-date and very readable presentation...

Review by Alan Hoover


Book Review

In the Shadow of the Great War: The Milligan and Hart Explorations of Northeastern British Columbia, 1913-14

Jay Sherwood has given us another chapter in the story of how the talented surveyors of the early twentieth century put vast areas of northern British Columbia on the map. The places visited by E.B....

Review by Robin and Jillian Ridington


Book Review

Life in the Tee-Pee

In the spring of 1956, the proprietors of the roadside Tee-Pee Restaurant near Boston Bar were unceremoniously informed that their business and odd assortment of buildings would be expropriated and destroyed to make way for...

Review by Ian Mosby


Book Review

John Clarke: Explorer of the Coast Mountains

For over a century, the Coast Mountains have drawn British Columbians, through both gaze and gait, to embrace the rugged peaks for which they are known. And, from the exploratory expeditions of the Mundays in...

Review by David Rossiter


Book Review

Rewriting Marpole: The Path to Cultural Complexity in the Gulf of Georgia Region

         Rewriting Marpole is the published version of Clark’s PhD dissertation (Clark, 2010) and an outgrowth of his MA thesis (Clark, 2000). The goal of his research “is to determine the spatial...

Review by Jesse Morin


Book Review

No Longer Captives of the Past: The story of a Reconciliation on Erromango

No Longer Captives of the Past is an important book for two reasons. It offers an excellent case study of modern day reconciliation remediating past wrongs, and it reminds us how, in this interconnected world,...

Review by Jean Barman


Book Review

Sidetracked: The Struggle for BC’s Fossils

This book explores the relationship between professional paleontologists and amateur fossil collectors in the context of several important paleontological sites in British Columbia. It focuses on the friction that can develop between enthusiastic amateur collectors...

Review by Godfrey Nowlan


Book Review

People of the Middle Fraser Canyon: An Archaeological History

The authors, from the departments of anthropology at the University of Montana (Prentiss) and the University of Notre Dame (Kuijt), draw on their extensive and recent archaeological work in the interior of British Columbia to...

Review by Douglas Hudson


Book Review

Brian Jungen

The book provides an overview of the career of the artist Brian Jungen, consisting of essays by Daina Augaitis and four other notable curators — Cuauhtémoc Medina, Ralph Rugoff, Kitty Scott, and Trevor Smith. The...

Review by Geoffrey Carr