We acknowledge that we live and work on unceded Indigenous territories and we thank the Musqueam, Squamish and Tsleil-Waututh Nations for their hospitality.

Index

Results (156)

Book Review

Finding a Way to the Heart: Feminist Writings on Aboriginal and Women’s History in Canada

As recently as forty years ago, Sylvia Van Kirk sat in the Hudson’s Bay Company Archives in London and asked a completely new question of the business papers of this iconic and long-standing company: “Where...

Review by Frieda Klippenstein


Book Review

Cartographies of Violence: Japanese Canadian Women, Memory, and the Subjects of the Internment

In the second chapter of her powerful book, Mona Oikawa indicts the critical reception of well-known Japanese-Canadian representations of Internment. Readings of Muriel Kitagawa’s This is My Own, for example, have tended to “exceptionalize” it...

Review by Jordan Stanger-Ross


Book Review

A Wilder West: Rodeo in Western Canada

This is a book about people in small towns in the west, and the rodeos that have provided ways to negotiate their complex social, economic, and cultural relationships with each other and with the animals...

Review by J. Chamberlin


Book Review

Epidemic Encounters: Influenza, Society, and Culture in Canada, 1918-20

Epidemics call out the ambulance-chaser in all of us, and for health historians, there is none more attention-grabbing than the 1918-20 influenza pandemic, mistakenly dubbed the “Spanish Flu,” the only infectious disease to stop the...

Review by Megan Davies


Book Review

Dim Sum Stories: A Chinatown Childhood

Vancouver’s Chinatown has been the subject of numerous notable academic studies, providing a focus that has proven to be essential to the Canadian historical narrative. In analyzing the history of Vancouver’s Chinatown, scholars have made...

Review by LiLynn Wan


Book Review

The British Columbia Court of Appeal: The First Hundred Years, 1910-2010

A law court has an inner life, beyond the many outside lives that it can rescue, ruin, remedy and reward. When it is an appellate court, the urge to converge as group judgment replaces the...

Review by DeLloyd Guth


Book Review

Lillian Alling: The Journey Home

In 1929, Lillian Alling reached the coast of Alaska on her way to Siberia. Her three-year walk across North America began in New York City and ended at Cape Wales where her footsteps disappeared after...

Review by PearlAnn Reichwein


Book Review

Stranger Intimacy: Contesting Race, Sexuality, and the Law in the North American West

  Nayan Shah observes that historians get it wrong when they privilege permanent populations over transient, the nuclear family over other domestic arrangements, and polarized rather than various gender roles. He complains – fairly —...

Review by Hugh Johnston


Book Review

Retail Nation: Department Stores and the Making of Modern Canada

Retail Nation is a thought-provoking study of the intersection between a rapidly growing consumer economy and the formation of culture and identity in Canada between 1890 and 1940. During this period, argues Donica Belisle, department...

Review by Nicolas Kenny


Book Review

Exploring Fort Vancouver

This fine volume is truly a “must” for those with more than a passing interest in the origins of the multi-ethnic area of the Pacific Northwest Coast, from the Aboriginal inhabitants to the eighteenth and...

Review by Stanley Copp


Book Review

A Sisterhood of Suffering and Service: Women and Girls of Canada and Newfoundland During the First World War

When it comes to the history of women in wartime Canada, the Second World War has so far attracted the most attention from scholars. Perhaps surprisingly, given the otherwise-abundant scholarship on Canada’s Great War, those...

Review by Lisa Pasolli


Book Review

Whoever Gives us Bread: The Story of Italians in British Columbia

More than twenty years ago, Gabriele Scardellato lamented the dearth of attention to Italian Canadians living “beyond the frozen wastes” (Scardellato 1989). There have been modest advances since that time, including Patricia K. Wood’s Nationalism...

Review by Stephen Fielding


Book Review

Rebel Women of the West Coast: Their Triumphs, Tragedies and Lasting Legacies

Rebel Women of the West Coast comprises stories about individual women who, through their talent, perseverance, and determination, were able to overcome patriarchal systems designed to keep them out of professional organizations. Author Rich Mole...

Review by Rose Fine-Meyer


Book Review

The Legendary Betty Frank: The Cariboo’s Alpine Queen

As a young girl, Betty Cox (Frank) had some very non-traditional ideas of what she wanted to be when she grew up. She dreamed of riding horses, mushing dogs, and guiding hunters in the northern...

Review by Judy Campbell


Book Review

Challenging Traditions: Contemporary First Nations Art of the Northwest Coast

This generously illustrated exhibition catalogue introduces the work of forty contemporary First Nations artists, ranging from emerging practitioners such as Shawn Hunt and Alano Edzerza to internationally renowned individuals such as Robert Davidson and Susan...

Review by Megan Smetzer


Book Review

Human Welfare, Rights, and Social Activism: Rethinking the Legacy of J.S. Woodsworth

Human Welfare, Rights, and Social Activism is one of those unique edited volumes in which the whole is indeed greater than the sum of its parts. As suggested in the subtitle, the legacy of J.S. Woodsworth...

Review by Karen Murray


Book Review

Indigenous Women and Feminism: Politics, Activism, Culture.

The unique circumstances of indigenous women are often overlooked in the literature on both mainstream feminism and indigenous activism. Indigenous Women and Feminism: Politics, Activism, Culture is thus a welcome addition to the existing scholarship....

Review by Tina Block


Book Review

The Aquaculture Controversy in Canada: Activism, Policy, and Contested Science

There are few issues in British Columbia more divisive than aquaculture. With their new book, Nathan Young and Ralph Matthews provide a timely, well-documented, and clearly articulated step back from the aquaculture fray. The impetus...

Review by Jaime Yard