We acknowledge that we live and work on unceded Indigenous territories and we thank the Musqueam, Squamish and Tsleil-Waututh Nations for their hospitality.

Index

Results (259)

Review

Homefront and Battlefront: Nelson BC in World War II

When author Sylvia Crooks was a three-year-old growing up in Nelson, a young man named Maurice Latornell taught her how to skate. In 1944, Latornell died during a bombing mission over Berlin. For Crooks, Latornell’s...

Review by Duff Sutherland


Review

Exploring Fort Vancouver

This fine volume is truly a “must” for those with more than a passing interest in the origins of the multi-ethnic area of the Pacific Northwest Coast, from the Aboriginal inhabitants to the eighteenth and...

Review by Stanley Copp


Review

Names on a Cenotaph: Kootenay Lake Men in World War I

Sylvia Crooks’s Homefront and Battlefront: Nelson BC in World War II (2005) brought to life the lives of all the men honoured on the Nelson cenotaph and the impact of the war on their families...

Review by Duff Sutherland


Review

The Bastard of Fort Stikine: The Hudson’s Bay Company and the Murder of John McLoughlin, Jr.

  During his round-the-world voyage in 1842, Hudson’s Bay Company (HBC) Governor George Simpson arrived at Fort Stikine and discovered that chief trader John McLoughlin Jr. had been killed. Two recent books discuss this event....

Review by Corey Larson


Review

John Scouler (c.1804-1871) Scottish Naturalist: A Life, with Two Voyages

Less celebrated than his friend David Douglas, John Scouler was nevertheless an important scientific traveller to the Strait of Juan de Fuca, Nootka Sound, Haida Gwaii, and Observatory Inlet in 1825. Although Douglas has been...

Review by Ted Binnema


Review

Svoboda

Bill Stenson’s Svoboda is a coming-of-age novel set in the West Kootenay during the 1950s. Vasili Saprikin is a Doukhobor who spends most of his earliest years with his mother (a widow) and grandfather in...

Review by Duff Sutherland


Review

Fort St. James and New Caledonia: Where British Columbia Began

Many residents of British Columbia are probably unaware that the settler history of the province began not in the Fraser Valley but in New Caledonia, the north-central interior, a result not of the explorations of...

Review by William Morrison


Review

Uncertain Accommodation: Aboriginal Identity and Group Rights in the Supreme Court of Canada

The Supreme Court of Canada’s approach to Aboriginal identity is fraudulent and harmful to Indigenous peoples in Canada.  This is essentially the conclusion reached by Professor Panagos in his new book.  Although this conclusion is...

Review by Larry Chartrand


Review

Retail Nation: Department Stores and the Making of Modern Canada

Retail Nation is a thought-provoking study of the intersection between a rapidly growing consumer economy and the formation of culture and identity in Canada between 1890 and 1940. During this period, argues Donica Belisle, department...

Review by Nicolas Kenny


Review

Sojourning Sisters: The Lives and Letters of Jessie and Annie McQueen

JEAN BARMAN’S Soujourning Sisters is an important book that merits a wide audience, consisting of both those interested specifically in British Columbia and those interested in Canadian history writ large. It recasts the notion of...

Review by Suzanne Morton


Review

Passing Through Missing Pages: The Intriguing Story of Annie Garland Foster

In the early 1990s, author Frances Welwood agreed to research the life of Annie Garland Foster for a Nelson Museum exhibition, “The Women of Nelson, 1880-1950.” An early woman graduate of the University of New...

Review by Duff Sutherland


Review

Exalted Subjects: Studies in the Making of Race and Nation in Canada

This is an interesting and provocative book that will motivate readers to rethink the role of the state in directing and managing a multicultural society. Exalted Subjects is divided into a number of sections labelled...

Review by Frances Henry


Review

Picturing Transformation: Nexw Áyantsut

Picturing Transformation: Nexw Áyantsut is the collaborative effort of a prize-winning photographer (Nancy Bleck), a writer (Katherine Dodds), and a Squamish Nation chief (Bill Williams). The 175-page coffee-table book documents the story of how a...

Review by Dorothy Kennedy


Review

Cultural Grammars of Nation, Diaspora, and Indigeneity in Canada

Cultural Grammars of Nation, Diaspora, and Indigeneity in Canada is a valuable contribution to an emerging discourse within the field of Indigenous Studies. It furthers a multi-disciplinary dialogue by exploring the relationships between transnationalism, diaspora,...

Review by Gabrielle Legault


Review

All that We Say Is Ours: Guiyaaw and the Reawakening of the Haida Nation

Guujaaw and the Reawakening of the Haida Nation: All That We Say Is Ours is a human interest story around issues of Aboriginal title and rights. Ian Gill is an award-winning journalist, author, and the...

Review by E.R. Atleo


Review

Children of the Kootenays: Memories of Mining Towns

Shirley D. Stainton’s Children of the Kootenays: Memories of Mining Townsdescribes her own and her brother Ray’s childhoods in West Kootenay mining communities during the 1930s and 1940s. Stainton’s father, Lee Hall, was a cook...

Review by Duff Sutherland


Review

The Amazing Mazie Baker: The Squamish Nation’s Warrior Elder

I grew up ten minutes away from Eslha7án, the Mission Indian Reserve, in what is today known as North Vancouver, which is part of the territory of the Sḵwx̱wú7mesh Úxwumixw or Squamish Nation. Yet I...

Review by Sean Carleton


Review

A Nation in Conflict: Canada and the Two World Wars

In the practice of military history, historians have tended to examine conflicts independently of each other, separating them out from other conflicts and from broader social currents and non-military events. Conflicts are often treated individually,...

Review by Jonathan Weier


Review

Angus McDonald of the Great Divide: The Uncommon Life of a Fur Trader 1816-1889

The Hudson’s Bay Company (HBC) has been the source for North American historians since the late nineteenth century. From the beginnings of it adventures in the fur trade, the Company’s head office in London sent...

Review by Deidre Simmons


Review

Time Travel: Tourism and the Rise of the Living History Museum in Mid-Twentieth-Century Canada

We all remember them. I know that I do. Having spent a summer in my youth washing dishes at Fort Steele heritage town, I remember the wooden boardwalks, the ramshackle buildings, the yellow school buses...

Review by Sean MacPherson


Review

Selling Canada: Three Propaganda Campaigns that Shaped the Nation

In his latest project Daniel Francis takes on a series of publicity campaigns, running from the 1870s through to 1940: immigration to western Canada, the First World War, and the promotion of tourism from the...

Review by Doug Owram


Review

“Metis:” Race, Recognition, and the Struggle for Indigenous Peoplehood

In “Métis,” Chris Andersen highlights the widespread marginalization of Métis peoples by taking to task the continued racialization of the term “Métis.” Systematically unpacking the ways in which the word “Métis” has been misrecognized and...

Review by Gabrielle Legault