We acknowledge that we live and work on unceded Indigenous territories and we thank the Musqueam, Squamish and Tsleil-Waututh Nations for their hospitality.

Index

Results (73)

Book Review

Victoria Unbuttoned: A Red-Light History of BC’s Capital City

Linda J. Eversole’s first book, Stella: Unrepentant Madam, written in 2005, was praised for its academic value and readability.   The author continues her exploration of women in the sex trade with Victoria Unbuttoned, profiling ten...

Review by Janet Nicol


Book Review

He Speaks Volumes: A Biography of George Bowering

The Canadian writers who rose (or leapt) to prominence in the 1960s and 1970s, and who are sometimes thought to be synonymous with Canadian literature itself, are now venerable. Although Margaret Atwood remains a formidable...

Review by Nicholas Bradley


Book Review

Vancouverism

It’s best to start any study with a clear, concise, and irrefutable sentence. But “Vancouver is a place” is taking that axiom too far. And, as anyone who knows horses will tell you, a place...

Review by John Douglas Belshaw


Book Review

Children of the Kootenays: Memories of Mining Towns

Shirley D. Stainton’s Children of the Kootenays: Memories of Mining Towns describes her own and her brother Ray’s childhoods in West Kootenay mining communities during the 1930s and 1940s. Stainton’s father, Lee Hall, was a cook...

Review by Duff Sutherland


Book Review

Trail North: The Okanagan Trail of 1858-68 and Its Origins in British Columbia and Washington

In Trail North, Ken Mather directs our attention to a relatively forgotten part of British Columbian history: the trails linking the interior of British Columbia to the Columbia Plateau of Washington and their contribution to...

Review by Christopher Herbert


Book Review

Beyond Mile Zero: The Vanishing Alaska Highway Lodge Community

The Alaska Highway runs from Dawson Creek, British Columbia, to Delta Junction, Alaska. Built by the American military for defense purposes during the Second World War, it was opened to the public in 1948 and...

Review by Steve Penfold


Book Review

Unbuilt Environments: Tracing Postwar Development in Northwest British Columbia

In 1921 the Prince George Citizen reminded its readership that “central B.C. is not a new country” (Prince George Citizen 1921). Defining “central B.C.” as those parts of the province situated between the 52nd and...

Review by Daniel Sims


Book Review

Points of Entry: How Canada’s Immigration Officers Decide Who Gets In

Though less controversial than in many other countries, admission of immigrants and refugees to Canada not infrequently raises protests of “too many” or “too few” from partisan commentators, and sensationalised media accounts of particular entry...

Review by David Ley


Book Review

They Called Me Number One: Secrets and Survival at an Indian Residential School

Bev Sellars’s bestselling memoir, They Called Me Number One, is a personal account of an important part of the colonial history of British Columbia told from a specific region in the province (Cariboo) and from...

Review by Jay Lewyn


Book Review

Canadian State Trials, Volume IV

  The fourth volume of the Osgoode Society’s Canadian State Trials is a critical analysis of the powers, both theoretical and practical, of Canada’s judiciary and political executive, and how Canadian state officials used such...

Review by Scott Eaton


Book Review

Landscapes of War and Memory: The Two World Wars in Canadian Literature and the Arts, 1977–2007

In Jack Hodgins’s Broken Ground (1998), memories of the Great War haunt the fictional community of Portuguese Creek on Vancouver Island, but what should be remembered of the horrors of France remains uncertain. The notebook...

Review by Nicholas Bradley


Book Review

The Gold Will Speak For Itself: Peter Leech and Leechtown

Vancouver Island has a distinctive personality among the regions of British Columbia, one that has been shaped in complex ways by geography and history. The books reviewed here vary in their candlepower, but all of...

Review by Patrick Dunae


Book Review

A Missing Genocide and the Demonization of its Heroes

Tom Swanky’s self-published book A Missing Genocide and the Demonization of its Heroes brings into sharp focus the problems faced by historians steeped in a discipline that does not fully appreciate the culturally constructed limitations...

Review by Chris Arnett


Book Review

Canoe Crossings: Understanding the Craft That Helped Shape British Columbia

A devoted canoeist, Sanford Osler has used his wide experience with many forms of paddle-craft to write a comprehensive and well-informed review of canoeing and kayaking in British Columbia. His up-to-date and very readable presentation...

Review by Alan Hoover


Book Review

In the Shadow of the Great War: The Milligan and Hart Explorations of Northeastern British Columbia, 1913-14

Jay Sherwood has given us another chapter in the story of how the talented surveyors of the early twentieth century put vast areas of northern British Columbia on the map. The places visited by E.B....

Review by Robin and Jillian Ridington


Book Review

Life in the Tee-Pee

In the spring of 1956, the proprietors of the roadside Tee-Pee Restaurant near Boston Bar were unceremoniously informed that their business and odd assortment of buildings would be expropriated and destroyed to make way for...

Review by Ian Mosby