We acknowledge that we live and work on unceded Indigenous territories and we thank the Musqueam, Squamish and Tsleil-Waututh Nations for their hospitality.

Index

Results (207)

Book Review

Arthur Erickson: An Architect’s Life

David Stouck has written a remarkable history. More than a biography, it is an encompassing account of a remarkable figure in later modern Canadian and international cultural history. Stouck recovers the spirit and material record...

Review by Rhodri Windsor-Liscombe


Book Review

Debating Dissent: Canada and the Sixties

Generation has dominated sixties scholarship since the baby-boomers came of age in the 1960s. Early historical scholarship, often written by those who participated in the events, emphasized a rupture with the past. These writers focused...

Review by Nancy Janovicek


Book Review

Perfect Youth: The Birth of Canadian Punk

As the angry, impetuous, and disobedient stepchild of rock-and-roll, punk has become an increasingly popular topic for academic and popular writers. Yet, as Sam Sutherland’s Perfect Youth demonstrates, Canadian contributions have often gone unnoticed. In...

Review by Eryk Martin


Book Review

Saanich Ethnobotany: Culturally Important Plants of the WSANEC People

In Saanich Ethnobotany, Nancy Turner and Richard Hebda describe the land and vegetation of W̱SÁNEĆ (Saanich), examine the “many interrelationships between people and plants” (11), and explore the traditional ecological knowledge that allowed local First...

Review by Andrew Cienski


Book Review

Ever-Changing Sky: Doris Lee’s Journey from Schoolteacher to Cariboo Rancher

Doris Lee’s memoir, Ever-Changing Sky, offers readers an account of the nearly twenty years she and her husband spent as owner/operators of Big Lake Ranch, deep in the heart of British Columbia’s Cariboo country. Freshly...

Review by Megan Prins


Book Review

Mnemonic: A Book of Trees

In Mnemonic: A Book of Trees Teresa Kishkan explores how our concept of self is intimately connected to the places we have experienced. Kishkan describes how places are sensed and experienced, and how these place-specific...

Review by Lauren Harding


Book Review

Home Truths: Highlights from BC History

As co-editors of BC Studies, Richard Mackie and Graeme Wynn surveyed all the essays published in the journal since it first appeared in 1968 before deciding to focus on what they concluded were two dominant...

Review by J.I. Little


Book Review

Vladimir Krajina: World War II Hero and Ecology Pioneer

This book is a major addition to our understanding of Vladimir Krajina’s life and times because it provides a clear context to the life of this remarkable citizen. Jan Drabek’s father and Krajina played different...

Review by Iain Taylor


Book Review

Civilizing the Wilderness: Culture and Nature in Pre-Confederation Canada and Rupert’s Land

  Newcomers to Canada and Rupert’s Land in the mid-nineteenth century brought with them an assortment of cultural baggage. A. A. den Otter reveals that the twinned concepts of “civilization” and “wilderness” formed the dominant...

Review by Jonathan Clapperton


Book Review

In Twilight and in Dawn: A Biography of Diamond Jenness

At last there is a comprehensive biography of Diamond Jenness, perhaps Canada’s greatest anthropologist, and it’s an excellent one. Barnett Richling has risen to the task with a clear understanding of the man, his remarkable...

Review by Robin Ridington


Book Review

Gardens Aflame: Garry Oak Meadows of BC’s South Coast

The Garry oak meadows of southern Vancouver Island are among the rarest ecosystems in Canada. In Gardens Aflame, Maleea Acker takes on the ambitious goal of relating the history and ecology of Garry oak meadows,...

Review by Jenny McCune


Book Review

Bluebacks and Silver Brights: A Lifetime in the BC Fisheries From Bounty to Plunder

For sixty years the Campbell Avenue fish dock on Burrard Inlet was the hub of Vancouver’s fishing industry, home to numerous fish plants, smokehouses, and floats where the boats tied up. The Safarik family business,...

Review by Kenneth Campbell


Book Review

Nowhere Else on Earth: Standing Tall for the Great Bear Rainforest

The Great Bear Rainforest, also known as the North and Central Coast of British Columbia, is one of the last intact temperate rainforests left in the world. This region has received much attention since 1989,...

Review by Margaret (Maggie) Low


Book Review

City Critters: Wildlife in the Urban Jungle

This beautifully illustrated volume introduces readers young and old to the diversity of wild animals that share urban environments with us. Through entertaining anecdotes and compelling and often humorous narrative, Nicholas Read explains where these...

Review by Jennifer Bonnell


Book Review

British Columbia’s Inland Rainforest: Ecology, Conservation, and Management

“These two streams at the foot of the hills have formed a wide alluvial, on which are forest trees of enormous size; the white cedars were from fifteen to thirty six feet girth, clean grown...

Review by Andy MacKinnon


Book Review

The Chuck Davis History of Metropolitan Vancouver

Everyone who has spent any time researching Vancouver history seems to have a Chuck Davis story. Here’s mine. It’s about 1980, I’m a callow not-easily-impressed grad student doing work on some arcane heritage tax law...

Review by John Belshaw


Book Review

The Good Hope Cannery: Life and Death at a Salmon Cannery

Until post-war technology allowed for the centralization of salmon canning, the industry relied on numerous canneries located close to the fishing grounds. More than 200 canneries were scattered along the BC coast, and apart from...

Review by Kenneth Campbell


Book Review

Nature’s Northwest: The North Pacific Slope in the Twentieth Century

In Nature’s Northwest, William G. Robbins and Katrine Barber have synthesized a wealth of scholarship on the Greater Northwest, encompassing Idaho, Oregon, Washington, western Montana, and southern British Columbia. The authors track social, economic, political,...

Review by Richard Rajala


Book Review

Stranger Intimacy: Contesting Race, Sexuality, and the Law in the North American West

  Nayan Shah observes that historians get it wrong when they privilege permanent populations over transient, the nuclear family over other domestic arrangements, and polarized rather than various gender roles. He complains – fairly —...

Review by Hugh Johnston


Book Review

Manufacturing National Park Nature: Photography, Ecology, and the Wilderness Industry of Jasper

Contributing to the emerging and vibrant field of national park histories in Canada, J. Keri Cronin’s Manufacturing National Park Nature: Photography, Ecology, and the Wilderness Industry of Jasper explores how photographs created for tourist consumption...

Review by Jenny Clayton