We acknowledge that we live and work on unceded Indigenous territories and we thank the Musqueam, Squamish and Tsleil-Waututh Nations for their hospitality.

Index

Results (292)

Book Review

Traffic: Conceptual Art in Canada 1965-1980

Traffic: Conceptual Art in Canada 1965-1980 is the catalogue of arguably one of the most important exhibitions of Canadian art in recent history, which in turn dealt with one of the most transformative art movements...

Review by Vytas Narusevicius


Book Review

Patrician Liberal: The Public and Private Life of Sir Henri-Gustave Joly de Lotbinière, 1829-1908

  At first glance, a review of the biography of a nineteenth century Quebec politician seems out of place in BC Studies. Born in France in 1829 to a wealthy French Protestant father and his...

Review by Patricia E. Roy


Book Review

Whose Culture Is It, Anyway? Community Engagement in Small Cities

Whose Culture Is It, Anyway? addresses important questions about the contribution of arts and culture in small and medium sized cities and the ethos and ethics of supporting cultural development in these environments. Small and...

Review by Eric Brown


Book Review

The Bastard of Fort Stikine: The Hudson’s Bay Company and the Murder of John McLoughlin, Jr.

  During his round-the-world voyage in 1842, Hudson’s Bay Company (HBC) Governor George Simpson arrived at Fort Stikine and discovered that chief trader John McLoughlin Jr. had been killed. Two recent books discuss this event....

Review by Corey Larson


Book Review

An Archaeology of Asian Transnationalism

Although descriptive work on historic artifacts of Asian origin has been sporadically produced by American archaeologists since the 1960s, and by British Columbia archaeologists since the 1970s, recent years have seen a blossoming of Asian...

Review by Grant Ross Keddie


Book Review

Islands’ Spirit Rising: Reclaiming the Forests of Haida Gwaii

In Islands’ Spirit Rising: Reclaiming the Forests of Haida Gwaii, Louise Takeda challenges the dominant epistemological perspective on the politics of BC resource management in order to “[further] political and social justice” and “give back”...

Review by James Davey


Book Review

The Elusive Mr. Pond: The Soldier, Fur Trader and Explorer who Opened the Northwest

Barry Gough has masterfully grappled with the challenge of interpreting an important figure in the Canadian fur trade in his book, The Elusive Mr. Pond: The Soldier, Fur Trader and Explorer who Opened the Northwest....

Review by George Colpitts


Book Review

From the West Coast to the Western Front: British Columbians and the Great War

  When Mark Forsythe, host of CBC Radio’s mid-day show, BC Almanac, and journalist-producer Greg Dickson discovered that they were both involved in a personal quest to learn about great-uncles and grandfathers who had served...

Review by James Wood


Book Review

From Classroom to Battlefield: Victoria High School and the First World War

In his portrait of Victoria High School (VHS), Barry Gough has created a vivid microcosm of the First World War’s impact on Canadians. As one of Canada’s foremost historians, Gough brings a special authenticity to...

Review by James Wood


Book Review

The Sea Among Us: The Amazing Strait of Georgia

Much of my critique of Beamish and McFarlane’s The Sea Among Us is that familiar reviewer’s refrain: they didn’t write the book that I would have. With the luxury of a dozen different writers, I...

Review by Howard Stewart


Book Review

Vancouver Confidential

John Belshaw undertook the task of publishing a series of fifteen essays on Vancouver written by artists, journalists, and writers. There is no specific thesis in this collection, and no attempt to convey a specific...

Review by Marcel Martel


Book Review

Strange Visitors: Documents in Indigenous-Settler Relations in Canada from 1876

This is a timely, thoughtful, and useful collection of primary documents on the history of the interactions among Indigenous people, non-Indigenous people, and the Canadian state. Given what is currently available, it will be invaluable...

Review by Hamar Foster


Book Review

Closing Time: Prohibition, Rum-Runners, and Border Wars

The prohibition era has attracted much interest for generations. The American story — undoubtedly because of the violence, criminal involvement, and Hollywood exposure — has always overshadowed the somewhat milder, more complicated, and less linear...

Review by Wayne Norton


Book Review

Accidental Eden: Hippie Days on Lasqueti Island

A friend said recently that he didn’t think much of the new generation of histories about British Columbia’s “back-to-the-landers” in the 1960s and seventies. Because if you weren’t there, then the stories just don’t mean...

Review by Howard Stewart


Book Review

Rufus: The Life of the Canadian Journalist who Interviewed Hitler

Colin Castle has undertaken a labour of love. The retired schoolteacher spent four years researching, transcribing, and writing the story of newspaperman Lukin “Rufus” Johnston. The self-described “history buff” (xvii) married Val Johnston, the granddaughter...

Review by Bruce Hodding


Book Review

We Go Far Back In Time: The Letters of Earle Birney and Al Purdy, 1947-1987

Nicholas Bradley is to be commended for this edited collection of Earle Birney and Al Purdy’s correspondence. As might be expected from two epic figures of Canadian literature who lived and worked in British Columbia,...

Review by James Gifford


Book Review

Boundless Optimism: Richard McBride’s British Columbia

Patricia E. Roy’s Boundless Optimism: Richard McBride’s British Columbia examines the political career of one of the province’s most significant premiers. Born in New Westminster in 1870 and educated at New Westminster High School and...

Review by Duff Sutherland