We acknowledge that we live and work on unceded Indigenous territories and we thank the Musqueam, Squamish and Tsleil-Waututh Nations for their hospitality.

Index

Results (65)

Review

Waste Heritage

The protagonist of Irene Baird’s Depression-era novel Waste Heritage is Matt Striker, a twenty-three-year-old transient from Saskatchewan. A veteran of the Regina Riot in 1935, which ended the On-to-Ottawa trek, Matt arrives in Vancouver by...

Review by Andrew Parnaby


Review

Vancouver Confidential

John Belshaw undertook the task of publishing a series of fifteen essays on Vancouver written by artists, journalists, and writers. There is no specific thesis in this collection, and no attempt to convey a specific...

Review by Marcel Martel


Review

Soviet Princeton: Slim Evans and the 1932-33 Miners’ Strike

Arthur “Slim” Evans has long been a notable figure in Canadian labour history, most often associated with the famed On-to-Ottawa Trek that he led in 1935 in an effort to improve conditions in the relief...

Review by Ron Verzuh


Review

Rumble Seat, A Victorian Childhood Remembered

Helen Piddington’s Rumble Seat, A Victorian Childhood Remembered is a collection of 117 brief reminiscences of the author’s childhood on southern Vancouver Island during the Depression and World War Two. Born in 1931, Piddington was...

Review by Christopher Hanna


Review

Is it a house? Archaeological Excavations at English Camp, San Juan Island, Washington

Synthesizing archaeological research results from the Salish Sea can be a time-consuming task because of the international boundary that currently divides the region. This is further complicated by the rise of cultural resource management archaeology...

Review by Duncan McLaren


Review

Vancouver Noir: 1930-1960

In the August 1946 issue of the French cinema studies journal, L’écran française, French critic Nino Frank used the term “film noir” to describe a new generation of American crime films only recently allowed into...

Review by Vanessa Colantonio


Review

Boundless Optimism: Richard McBride’s British Columbia

Patricia E. Roy’s Boundless Optimism: Richard McBride’s British Columbia examines the political career of one of the province’s most significant premiers. Born in New Westminster in 1870 and educated at New Westminster High School and...

Review by Duff Sutherland


Review

Two Houses Half-Buried in Sand: Oral Traditions of the Hul’q’umi’num Coast Salish of Kuper Island and Vancouver Island

Huy tseep q’u, ah siem In a period marred by unemployment and economic hardships, Beryl Mildred Cryer, a Chemainus housewife, mother, and part-time journalist, set out to introduce the world to the oral traditions of...

Review by Sarah Morales


Review

Citizen Docker: Making a New Deal on the Vancouver Waterfront 1919-1939

In Citizen Docker Andrew Parnaby explores industrial relations on the Vancouver waterfront during the interwar years. The analysis is linked to a broader consideration of the transition to the welfare state and the new industrial...

Review by Gordon Hak


Review

L.D.: Mayor Louis Taylor and the Rise of Vancouver

MANY NORTH AMERICAN cities have had great civic leaders. Fiorello La Guardia, New York’s Depression-era mayor, is considered the father of modern New York; Metro chair Fred Gardiner put his distinctive imprint on Toronto in the...

Review by Robert McDonald


Review

Capital and Labour in the British Columbia Forest Industry, 1934-1974

A few exceptions aside, the remarkable escalation of books that have investigated British Columbia’s forests and forest economy in recent years have not paid much attention to labour. Yet labour’s role is vital to the evolution...

Review by Roger Hayter


Review

Creating a Modern Countryside: Liberalism and Land Resettlement in British Columbia

British Columbia is noteworthy among Canadian provinces for its paucity of good farmland. Too much is rocky, the coastal forests are daunting, a great deal is arid, elevations are too great to support crops, and...

Review by John Belshaw


Review

BravO! The History of Opera in British Columbia

  If you think the drama of opera takes place primarily on the stage, BravO! will open a new world to you. In her finely documented history Cunningham takes us from the Bianchi Italian Opera...

Review by Jane Hastings


Review

States of Nature: Conserving Canada’s Wildlife in the Twentieth Century

The publication of Tina Loo’s States of Nature: Conserving Canada’s Wildlife in the Twentieth Century marks the coming of age of the field of Canadian environmental history. In some respects, this statement may seem over...

Review by Billy Parenteau


Review

Vancouver’s Bessborough Armoury: a History. Vancouver: The Fifteenth Field Artillery

Victor Stevenson’s longstanding personal and professional attachment to Vancouver’s Bessborough Armoury is reflected in his concise and well-researched account of the building’s history. Having served as both honourary colonel of the 15th Field Artillery Regiment,...

Review by James Wood


Review

The Quadra Story: A History of Quadra Island

Jeanette Taylor’s history of Quadra Island is a welcome addition to Harbour Publishing’s growing collection of Coast histories. It draws on Taylor’s profound local knowledge of the northern strait and complements her histories of Campbell...

Review by Howard Stewart


Review

Women on Ice: The Early Years of Women’s Hockey in Western Canada

In January 1997 the Gateway, the University of Alberta’s student newspaper, reported on the first game played by the Pandas, the women’s hockey team: “it was fascinating to watch these women playing their hearts out,...

Review by David Mills


Review

Comrades and Critics: Women, Literature, and the Left in 1930s Canada

Canada’s best-known female literary writers from the 1930s are all closely associated with British Columbia: activist wordsmith Dorothy Livesay, then a member of the Communist Party, who first moved to Vancouver in 1936; Anne Marriott,...

Review by Carole Gerson


Review

I Am Full Moon: Stories of a Ninth Daughter

About a decade ago, I wrote a review article in this journal in which I expressed the hope that more first-hand accounts of growing up Japanese or Chinese in British Columbia would be published [1]....

Review by Patricia Roy


Review

‘Call Me Hank’: A Sto:lo Man’s Reflections on Logging, Living, and Growing Old

Old loggers love to tell stories, but few find their way onto paper. We are fortunate indeed, then, that in 1969 linguist Wyn Roberts visited Henry Pennier at his home near Mission and asked the...

Review by Richard Rajala


Review

Fish versus Power: An Environmental History of the Fraser River

IN CIRCLES WHERE SALMON management gets debated, the Fraser River looms large because it helps drive a neat syllogism, which goes something like this: Columbia River runs imploded because American scientists supported a massive dam-building...

Review by Joseph Taylor