We acknowledge that we live and work on unceded Indigenous territories and we thank the Musqueam, Squamish and Tsleil-Waututh Nations for their hospitality.

Index

Results (668)

Book Review

The Promise of Paradise: Utopian Communities in British Columbia

My childhood vacations did not involve the sophisticated technology that keeps my children (relatively) quiet in the backseat today. Apart from what I recall to be my endless patience on those long and winding drives...

Review by Darcy Ingram


Book Review

Georgia Straight: A 50th Anniversary Celebration and City on Edge: A Rebellious Century of Vancouver Protests, Riots, and Strikes

Vancouver has always had a volatile streak; it’s a key ingredient of the city’s identity, a theme in the story Vancouverites tell themselves about their place in the world. Perhaps political polarization, western alienation, protests,...

Review by Lani Russwurm


Book Review

People of the Saltwater: An Ethnography of the Gitlax m’oon.

 “Gitlax m’oon, people of the saltwater” are more commonly known as the Gitxaala; their principal village, Lach Klan is located on what is now called Dolphin Island, a little to the south of Prince Rupert....

Review by Robert M. Galois


Book Review

Mixed Blessings: Indigenous Encounters with Christianity in Canada

Mixed Blessings is a collection of papers developed for a May 2011 workshop, “Religious Encounter and Exchange in Aboriginal Canada,” capably edited by historians Tolly Bradford and Chelsea Horton, whose helpful introduction and conclusion pull...

Review by Dorothy Kennedy


Book Review

The W̲SÁNEĆ and Their Neighbours: Diamond Jenness on the Coast Salish of Vancouver Island, 1935

Anthropologist Rolf Knight launched a new chapter of Indigenous history in 1978 with the publication of his book, Indians at Work: An Informal History of Native Indian Labour in British Columbia, 1858-1930.[1]  In contrast to...

Review by Wendy Wickwire


Book Review

Settler Anxiety at the Outposts of Empire: Colonial Relations, Humanitarian Discourses and the Imperial Press

In May 1861, the British Colonist, a local newspaper in Victoria, Vancouver Island, reported on a “Horrid Massacre in New Zealand.” According to the Colonist, Maori warriors had launched a surprise attack on a small...

Review by Robert Hogg


Book Review

The Life and Art of Arthur Pitts

Kerry Mason begins The Life and Art of Arthur Pitts with a question: ‘Why haven’t I heard about this artist?’ (x) By the end of the book the reader is persuaded that we should indeed...

Review by Maria Tippett


Book Review

The Last Gang in Town: The Epic Story of the Vancouver Police vs. the Clark Park Gang

The past decade has witnessed a surge in Vancouver criminal and nocturnal history, from Daniel Francis’s Red Light Neon (2006) to Diane Purvey and John Belshaw’s Vancouver Noir (2011) and Belshaw’s edited collection Vancouver Confidential...

Review by Matthieu Caron


Book Review

In the Spirit of Homebirth: Modern Women, An Ancient Choice

This edited volume of modern BC birthing stories will be a compelling read for anyone with a personal or professional interest in the rich drama of childbirth. Not intended as a scholarly text, the sixty...

Review by Megan J. Davies


Book Review

Animal Metropolis: Histories of Human-Animal Relations in Urban Canada

Animal Metropolis: Histories of Human-Animal Relations in Urban Canada edited by Joanna Dean, Darcy Ingram, and Christabelle Sethna represents a collective effort to create a historiography of nonhuman animals and human subjects in Canada since...

Review by Stephanie Eccles


Book Review

Unbuilt Environments: Tracing Postwar Development in Northwest British Columbia

In 1921 the Prince George Citizen reminded its readership that “central B.C. is not a new country” (Prince George Citizen 1921). Defining “central B.C.” as those parts of the province situated between the 52nd and...

Review by Daniel Sims


Book Review

Maximum Canada: Why 35 Million Canadians Are Not Enough

Anyone with even the most superficial knowledge of eugenics, racism, the ‘domestication’ of women, and the history of the 20th century will know why pronatalism might ring the wrong bells. And this is setting aside...

Review by John Douglas Belshaw