We acknowledge that we live and work on unceded Indigenous territories and we thank the Musqueam, Squamish and Tsleil-Waututh Nations for their hospitality.

Index

Results (166)

Book Review

The Private Journal of Captain G. H. Richards: The Vancouver Island Survey (1860-1862)

Captain (later Admiral Sir) George Henry Richards, Royal Navy, is one of the great personages of that unique era in modern history known as Pax Britannica – a period when “Britain Ruled the Waves,” and sometimes, as...

Review by Barry Gough


Book Review

Historical Dictionary of the Discovery and Exploration of the Northwest Coast of America

The fourth in a series of historical dictionaries from the Scarecrow Press, Robin Inglis’s Historical Dictionary meets the standard set by its predecessors. In a good, general introduction (there are no citations or notes), Inglis...

Review by I.S. MacLaren


Book Review

The Final Forest: Big Trees, Forks, and the Pacific Northwest

Telling the story of the timber wars in the national forests of the Pacific Northwest is a task that has moved from journalism to history, William Dietrich suggests in this 2010 edition of The Final...

Review by Emily Davis


Book Review

Cleaner Greener Smarter: A Prescription for Stronger Canadian Environmental Laws and Policies

The World Health Organization released an update to the Global Urban Ambient Air Pollution Database on 12 May 2016, finding that more than 80 percent of people who live in major cities around the world...

Review by Deborah Curran


Book Review

Dream City: Vancouver and the Global Imagination

Dream City. The title is captivating, but what does it mean? Lance Berelowitz’s book about changes in the urban design and planning of Vancouver opens and closes by briefly discussing the phrase “dream city,” but...

Review by Lawrence McCann


Book Review

Arctic Ambitions: Captain Cook and the Northwest Passage

James Cook was the greatest navigator of his, and perhaps any, age. He did more than any other individual to make the Pacific, which covers one third of the earth’s surface, known to Europe. Through...

Review by Robin Fisher


Book Review

An Archaeology of Asian Transnationalism

Although descriptive work on historic artifacts of Asian origin has been sporadically produced by American archaeologists since the 1960s, and by British Columbia archaeologists since the 1970s, recent years have seen a blossoming of Asian...

Review by Grant Ross Keddie


Book Review

The Oil Man and the Sea: Navigating the Northern Gateway

This book, aptly titled The Oil Man and the Sea, is about the current threat posed by the proposed Enbridge Northern Gateway pipeline to the ecosystems and people of the Great Bear Rainforest. This region,...

Review by Maggie Low


Book Review

Salal: Listening for the Northwest Understory

I live on forested acreage at the north end of the Sechelt Peninsula, surrounded by salal. I think of Gaultheria shallon as the signature plant of the landscape I have loved my whole life. The glossy...

Review by Theresa Kishkan


Book Review

The Third Crop: A Personal and Historical Journey into the Photo Albums and Shoeboxes of the Slocan Valley, 1800s to early 1940s

The Slocan Valley is quirky and isolated, and its past can be told in many ways. The valley has been a site of conflict between capital and labour on an industrial mining frontier, a haven for...

Review by Cole Harris


Book Review

Terrain of Memory: A Japanese Canadian Memorial Project

After the Second World War, most of the Japanese relocated in camps in the interior were sent to Ontario or to Japan, while many of those who remained in British Columbia, largely the elderly or...

Review by Cole Harris


Book Review

The Labyrinth of North American Identities

Much writing on early Canada has sought to explain why Canada is not the United States. The roots of the two countries are alleged to have been very different, and to explain different contemporary societies....

Review by Cole Harris


Book Review

Memories of Jack Pickup: Flying Doctor of British Columbia

       Transportation and communication technologies have played an integral role in modernizing British Columbia by reconfiguring possibilities of movement and exchange. As Cole Harris has pointed out in The Resettlement of British Columbia (1997), the...

Review by Bret Edwards


Book Review

Nothing to Write Home About: British Family Correspondence and the Settler Everyday in British Columbia

The history of colonial British Columbia is, in many respects, well-trodden ground. Over the past few decades, scholars like Jean Barman, Cole Harris, and Adele Perry have made multiple transformative contributions to our understanding of...

Review by Kristine Alexander


Book Review

Missing Women, Missing News: Covering Crisis in Vancouver’s Downtown Eastside

In a publication coincident with the launch of the inquiry into the police investigation of convicted serial killer Robert Pickton, David Hugill’s Missing Women, Missing News poses a vital and timely challenge to common-sense frames...

Review by Tyler McCreary


Book Review

Home Truths: Highlights from BC History

As co-editors of BC Studies, Richard Mackie and Graeme Wynn surveyed all the essays published in the journal since it first appeared in 1968 before deciding to focus on what they concluded were two dominant...

Review by J.I. Little


Book Review

Do Glaciers Listen?: Local Knowledge, Colonial Encounters, and Social Imagination

PDF – Harris Review Essay, BC Studies 148, Winter 2005/06  

Review by Cole Harris


Book Review

Athapaskan Migration: The Archaeology of Eagle Lake, British Columbia

Migration is one mechanism that archaeologists have put forward to explain significant change in cultural materials through time. However, due to its linear and rather simplistic explanation of human activity (i.e. material change = wholesale...

Review by Chris Springer