We acknowledge that we live and work on unceded Indigenous territories and we thank the Musqueam, Squamish and Tsleil-Waututh Nations for their hospitality.

Index

Results (274)

Book Review

Belonging Métis

The title of Belonging Métis is apt because the book illuminates the common twenty-first century Métis condition of yearning for belonging. Having been alienated from their geographical homeland on the Prairies beginning in 1870 when...

Review by Jennifer Hayter


article

Book Review

Christy Clark: Behind the Smile

According to Judi Tyabji this is “not an authorized biography. In fact, it’s not really a biography at all because she’s still premier.” Rather, it is “a book about Premier Clark written by someone who...

Review by Patricia Roy


Book Review

The Business of Power: Hydroelectricity in Southeastern British Columbia, 1897-1997

When Jeremy Mouat’s The Business of Power first came out in 1997, both Cominco and West Kootenay Power and Light, the main corporate subjects of Mouat’s book (the latter of which commissioned it), had recently...

Review by Phillip Van Huizen


Book Review

The Salish Sea: Jewel of the Pacific Northwest

Audrey DeLella Benedict and Joseph Gaydos’s book about the Salish Sea, like Beamish and McFarlane’s recent tome on the Strait of Georgia (or North Salish Sea), The Sea Among Us, is a gorgeously illustrated and...

Review by Howard Stewart


Book Review

The Salmon People

When The Salmon People was first published in 1967, commercial salmon fishing still sustained many coastal communities, although as Hugh McKervill pointed out then, there were plenty of signs that the resource was threatened. In...

Review by Kenneth Campbell


Book Review

Liberal Hearts and Coronets: The Lives and Times of Ishbel Marjoribanks Gordon and John Campbell Gordon, the Aberdeens

Veronica Strong-Boag announces at the outset of her latest book that “Lords and ladies are rarely in fashion for critical scholars or democratic activists. This is unfortunate” (3). Thankfully she decided to take on Ishbel...

Review by Carolyn MacHardy


Book Review

Watershed Moments: A Pictorial History of Courtenay and District

Those who would wish to time-travel to the Comox Valley of the First World War era need only to walk the streets of today’s Courtenay downtown core. There they will encounter numerous large publicly-displayed photographs...

Review by Dan Hinman-Smith


Book Review

Blockades or Breakthroughs?: Aboriginal Peoples Confront the Canadian State

Canada is no stranger to Aboriginal direct action: “Oka, Ipperwash, Caledonia. Blockades, masked warriors, police snipers” (3). Citing this excerpt from the 2006 report of Standing Senate Committee on Aboriginal peoples to introduce the collection...

Review by Sarah Nickel


Book Review

Street Sex Work and Canadian Cities: Resisting a Dangerous Order

Street Sex Work and Canadian Cities: Resisting a Dangerous Order aims to give voice to street-based sex workers in urban Canada, in particular Indigenous women who face intersecting stigma associated with sex work, racism, and...

Review by Cecilia Benoit


Book Review

Governing Transboundary Waters: Canada, the United States, and Indigenous Communities

Most of the world’s water basins are transborder. The vast majority of North America’s surface freshwater falls within a border watershed. Indeed, contemporary water governance within just one country is already complex enough — overlaying...

Review by Daniel Macfarlane


Book Review

Three Athapaskan Ethnographies: Diamond Jenness on the Sekani, Tsuu T’ina and Wet’suwet’en, 1921-1924

Diamond Jenness was a diligent and talented ethnographer, and the years 1921-1924 were particularly productive. In the summer of 1921 he visited the Sarcee (Suuu T’ina) of Alberta and wrote a report based on “field-notes...

Review by Robin Ridington


Book Review

Allied Power: Mobilizing Hydro-electricity during Canada’s Second World War

In Allied Power, Matthew Evenden expertly demonstrates how private and public power commissions and corporations throughout Canada expanded hydro-electric capacity in response to the ballooning demands for power and production during the Second World War....

Review by Jonathan McQuarrie