We acknowledge that we live and work on unceded Indigenous territories and we thank the Musqueam, Squamish and Tsleil-Waututh Nations for their hospitality.

Index

Results (685)

Book Review

Climber’s Paradise: Making Canada’s Mountain Parks, 1906-1974

Two powerful and iconic institutions can be found at the centre of most histories of tourism and recreation in the mountains of western Canada: the Canadian Pacific Railway and the agency known today as Parks...

Review by Ben Bradley


Book Review

Cold Case Vancouver: The City’s Most Baffling Unsolved Murders

Eve Lazarus’s fascination with Vancouver’s history continues with her latest book, Cold Case Vancouver: The City’s Most Baffling Unsolved Murders. Crime buffs and readers interested in true crime literature or in understanding how police investigate...

Review by Bonnie Reilly Schmidt


Book Review

Landscapes of War and Memory: The Two World Wars in Canadian Literature and the Arts, 1977–2007

In Jack Hodgins’s Broken Ground (1998), memories of the Great War haunt the fictional community of Portuguese Creek on Vancouver Island, but what should be remembered of the horrors of France remains uncertain. The notebook...

Review by Nicholas Bradley


Book Review

Blockades or Breakthroughs?: Aboriginal Peoples Confront the Canadian State

Canada is no stranger to Aboriginal direct action: “Oka, Ipperwash, Caledonia. Blockades, masked warriors, police snipers” (3). Citing this excerpt from the 2006 report of Standing Senate Committee on Aboriginal peoples to introduce the collection...

Review by Sarah Nickel


Book Review

Where the Rivers Meet: Pipelines, Participatory Resource Management, and Aboriginal-State Relations in the Northwest Territories

In Where the Rivers Meet, Carly Dokis skillfully examines local responses to the Mackenzie Gas Project — a proposed natural gas pipeline through the Sahtu Region of the Northwest Territories — and how these are...

Review by Mark Stoller


Book Review

Bootleggers and Borders: The Paradox of Prohibition on a Canada-US Borderland

Given how contentious relations between Canada and the US became during the American Prohibition era (1917-1933), it is surprising how little scholarly work has been done on the subject. There are many popular books about...

Review by Daniel Francis


Book Review

From Classroom to Battlefield: Victoria High School and the First World War

In his portrait of Victoria High School (VHS), Barry Gough has created a vivid microcosm of the First World War’s impact on Canadians. As one of Canada’s foremost historians, Gough brings a special authenticity to...

Review by James Wood


Book Review

Landscape Architecture in Canada

Landscape Architecture in Canada is Ron Williams’ magnum opus, the likely capstone of a distinguished career as researcher, teacher, and practitioner. It is a fine scholarly effort, more than fifteen years in the making. Until...

Review by Larry McCann


Book Review

We Go Far Back In Time: The Letters of Earle Birney and Al Purdy, 1947-1987

Nicholas Bradley is to be commended for this edited collection of Earle Birney and Al Purdy’s correspondence. As might be expected from two epic figures of Canadian literature who lived and worked in British Columbia,...

Review by James Gifford


Book Review

Pioneers of the Pacific Coast: A Chronicle of Sea Rovers and Fur Hunters

Until the later decades of the past century, historical writing was by men, about men, and for men. Narratives of the past made room for a queen, and the odd Laura Secord or Florence Nightingale,...

Review by Chad Reimer


Book Review

Raymond Collishaw and the Black Flight

Raymond Collishaw (1893-1976), a native of Nanaimo, began his career in uniform as a teenager with the Canadian Fisheries Protection Service. In 1915 Collishaw volunteered for the Royal Naval Air Service (RNAS). He qualified as...

Review by Andrew Iarocci


Book Review

Frontier Cowboys and the Great Divide: Early Ranching in BC and Alberta

I liked this book. It was well written, adequately-researched, and, in my opinion, achieved its author’s purpose. With his tight focus on frontier and early ranching personalities in British Columbia and Alberta, Mather gives the...

Review by Max Foran


Book Review

Carbon Democracy: Political Power in the Age of Oil

Carbon Democracy historicizes “the forms of democratic politics that carbon made possible” (233). Timothy Mitchell’s goal is nothing short of destabilizing two central intellectual and material pillars of modern western life: the sacrosanct institution of...

Review by Jonathan Peyton


Book Review

For King and Kanata: Canadian Indians and the First World War

Exploring the participation of Canadian First Nations in the First World War, Timothy Winegard takes aim at two historiographical problems: the tendency to simply insert Aboriginal military contributions where they have been otherwise ignored, and...

Review by Sarah Nickel


Book Review

Behind the Steam: The Inside Story of the Gastown Steam Clock

With a seemingly permanent cluster of tourists snapping its photo, the Gastown steam clock is undoubtedly one of the most popular tourist attractions in Vancouver. Despite its misleading Edwardian appearance (it was built in the...

Review by Lani Russwurm


Book Review

The Canadian Pacific’s Esquimalt & Nanaimo Railway: The CPR steam years, 1905-1949

While the roundhouses are now mostly silent and only the occasional freight train makes its way up and down the island, the Esquimalt & Nanaimo Railway (E&N) occupies a prominent place in Vancouver Island’s history....

Review by David Hill-Turner


Book Review

Above the Bush: A Century of Climbing on Vancouver Island, 1912-2012

In 1968, Mike Walsh did a solo ascent of Vancouver Island’s second highest peak, Mount Colonel Foster in Strathcona Park, “without rope or pitons,” an approach he did not recommend to others (67). Reporting on...

Review by Jenny Clayton


Book Review

Civilizing the Wilderness: Culture and Nature in Pre-Confederation Canada and Rupert’s Land

  Newcomers to Canada and Rupert’s Land in the mid-nineteenth century brought with them an assortment of cultural baggage. A. A. den Otter reveals that the twinned concepts of “civilization” and “wilderness” formed the dominant...

Review by Jonathan Clapperton


Book Review

Escape to Gold Mountain: A Graphic History of the Chinese in North America

Graphic texts are becoming increasingly popular as a way of telling history. Within three months of its official launch, David Wong’s Escape from Gold Mountain: A Graphic History of the Chinese in North America made...

Review by LiLynn Wan


Book Review

Canadians and the Natural Environment to the Twenty-First Century

The field of Canadian environmental history has blossomed over the past two decades. Consequently, instructors of Canadian environmental history courses are becoming increasingly spoiled with good options to choose from for course readers. In all...

Review by Jonathan Clapperton


Book Review

Lillian Alling: The Journey Home

In 1929, Lillian Alling reached the coast of Alaska on her way to Siberia. Her three-year walk across North America began in New York City and ended at Cape Wales where her footsteps disappeared after...

Review by PearlAnn Reichwein


Book Review

Feeding the Family: 100 Years of Food and Drink in Victoria

Until the later decades of the past century, historical writing was by men, about men, and for men. Narratives of the past made room for a queen, and the odd Laura Secord or Florence Nightingale,...

Review by Christopher Hanna