We acknowledge that we live and work on unceded Indigenous territories and we thank the Musqueam, Squamish and Tsleil-Waututh Nations for their hospitality.

Index

Results (120)

Book Review

Aqueduct: Colonialism, Resources, and the Histories We Remember

If, as Adele Perry suggests, history is cacophony, then the opening of Winnipeg’s Canadian Museum of Human Rights (CMHR) in September 2014 was bound to be discordant. Camped outside the CMHR, Anishinaabe from Shoal Lake...

Review by Dylan Burrows


Book Review

Moving Natures: Mobility and Environment in Canadian History

When the Kicking Horse Trail opened in 1927, connecting Banff to Golden by route of Lake Louise, parks visitors were presented with a scenic highway system unsurpassed elsewhere in the nation. For a nation that...

Review by J.L. Weller


Book Review

Once They Were Hats: In Search of the Mighty Beaver

In Once They Were Hats, Francis Backhouse, who teaches creative nonfiction at the University of Victoria, invites us to join her in exploring the multifaceted history of the beaver. She recounts personal stories about trips...

Review by Ezekiel Gow


Book Review

Creative Margins: Cultural Production in Canadian Suburbs

Alison Bain, an associate professor of geography at York University, begins Creative Margins with David Gordon and Mark Janzen’s assertion that “Canada is a suburban nation (3),” noting that our population, like that of the...

Review by Ginny Ratsoy


Book Review

Sonia: The Life of Bohemian, Rancher and Artist Sonia Cornwall, 1919-2006

Challenged to name women artists of British Columbia of the twentieth century, most people would stop at Emily Carr. While the list of both First Nations and settler women artists of British Columbia is impressively...

Review by Kerry Mason


Book Review

A Taste of Haida Gwaii: Food Gathering and Feasting at the Edge of the World

There is an alternative out there to the globalized world of agribusiness, GMOs (genetically modified organisms), and processed packaged food, one based on harvesting and using local, especially wild, foods and re-weaving them into our...

Review by Nancy J. Turner


Book Review

They Called Me Number One: Secrets and Survival at an Indian Residential School

Bev Sellars’s bestselling memoir, They Called Me Number One, is a personal account of an important part of the colonial history of British Columbia told from a specific region in the province (Cariboo) and from...

Review by Jay Lewyn


Book Review

Blockades or Breakthroughs?: Aboriginal Peoples Confront the Canadian State

Canada is no stranger to Aboriginal direct action: “Oka, Ipperwash, Caledonia. Blockades, masked warriors, police snipers” (3). Citing this excerpt from the 2006 report of Standing Senate Committee on Aboriginal peoples to introduce the collection...

Review by Sarah Nickel


Book Review

Allied Power: Mobilizing Hydro-electricity during Canada’s Second World War

In Allied Power, Matthew Evenden expertly demonstrates how private and public power commissions and corporations throughout Canada expanded hydro-electric capacity in response to the ballooning demands for power and production during the Second World War....

Review by Jonathan McQuarrie


Book Review

Carlo Gentile, Gold Rush Photographer, 1863-1866

Like most colonial-era Victoria photographers, Carlo Gentile arrived and departed with little notice. Born in Italy, he eventually found his way to California around 1860. Having reached Victoria from San Francisco in 1862, he was...

Review by David Mattison


Book Review

The Chinchaga Firestorm: When the Moon and Sun Turned Blue

Some fires are justly renowned. Some are celebrities — known for being known. A few are famous for being unknown. The 1871 Peshtigo fire in the US has long marketed itself as America’s Forgotten Fire....

Review by Stephen J. Pyne


Book Review

Names on a Cenotaph: Kootenay Lake Men in World War I

Sylvia Crooks’s Homefront and Battlefront: Nelson BC in World War II (2005) brought to life the lives of all the men honoured on the Nelson cenotaph and the impact of the war on their families...

Review by Duff Sutherland


Book Review

The Gold Will Speak For Itself: Peter Leech and Leechtown

Vancouver Island has a distinctive personality among the regions of British Columbia, one that has been shaped in complex ways by geography and history. The books reviewed here vary in their candlepower, but all of...

Review by Patrick Dunae


Book Review

Accidental Eden: Hippie Days on Lasqueti Island

A friend said recently that he didn’t think much of the new generation of histories about British Columbia’s “back-to-the-landers” in the 1960s and seventies. Because if you weren’t there, then the stories just don’t mean...

Review by Howard Stewart


Book Review

Lives Lived West of the Divide: A Biographical Dictionary of Fur Traders Working West of the Rockies, 1793-1858 Volumes 1-3

In 1793 Alexander Mackenzie crossed the continent in search of a route to the Pacific for the North West Company trade. He reached the Pacific at Dean Channel but failed to find a viable trade...

Review by Nancy Marguerite Anderson


Book Review

Schooling in Transition: Readings in Canadian History of Education

This collection of essays is edited by Sara Burke, a historian, and Patrick Milewski, a sociologist and former elementary school teacher, at Laurentian University. The title, Schooling in Transition, reflects the editors’ belief that public...

Review by Patrick A. Dunae


Book Review

Railway Rock Gang

Gary Sim worked for BC Rail rock gangs from 1978 until 1987. He gained first-hand experience in many facets of railway operations and maintenance that were the gangs’ day to day work: blasting, tree falling,...

Review by Robert D. Turner