We acknowledge that we live and work on unceded Indigenous territories and we thank the Musqueam, Squamish and Tsleil-Waututh Nations for their hospitality.

Index

Results (509)

Review

At Home with the Bella Coola Indians: T.F. Mcllwraith’s Field Letters, 1922-4

IN THE EARLY 1920s on the Northwest Coast of British Columbia, twenty-three-year-old anthropologist Thomas Forsyth Mcllwraith arrived in the Bella Coola Valley to study the small community of the Nuxalk people. He would later make...

Review by Jacinda Mack


Review

One River, Two Cultures: A History of the Bella Coola Valley

One River, Two Cultures effectively summarizes the structure and themes of Paula Wild’s study of the Bella Coola Valley. The Bella Coola River dominates the story. Traditional Nuxalkmc (or Nuxalk – Wild uses these terms...

Review by Patricia Roy


Review

Secwépemc People, Land, and Laws: Yerí7 re Stsq’ey’s-kucw

Marianne and Ron Ignace are members of the Secwépemc First Nation in south-central British Columbia.  Ron was raised by his great-grandparents, grew up speaking Secwepemctsín, and is a former Chief.  Both Ron and Marianne have...

Review by Robin Ridington


Review

Making Native Space: Colonialism, Resistance, and Reserves in British Columbia

OVERVIEW  IN MAKING NATIVE SPACE, Cole Harris describes how settlers displaced Aboriginal people from their land in British Columbia,1 painstakingly documenting the creation of Indian reserves in the province from the 1830s to 1938. Informed...

Review by Val Napoleon


Review

The Salmon People

When The Salmon People was first published in 1967, commercial salmon fishing still sustained many coastal communities, although as Hugh McKervill pointed out then, there were plenty of signs that the resource was threatened. In...

Review by Kenneth Campbell


Review

Voices of a Thousand People: The Makah Cultural Research Center

THE MAKAH TRIBE at Neah Bay, Washington State, has become one of the most visible and controversial Indigenous communities in North America due to the media gaze on their efforts to revive traditional whaling in...

Review by Michael Marker


Review

Konelīne: our land beautiful

As the language and culture director for the Tahltan Nation and a Tahltan academic, I believe giving voice to our people is crucial. Until recent times, the academy has privileged the voices of settlers and...

Review by Matthew Gartner


Review

People of the Saltwater: An Ethnography of the Gitlax m’oon.

 “Gitlax m’oon, people of the saltwater” are more commonly known as the Gitxaala; their principal village, Lach Klan is located on what is now called Dolphin Island, a little to the south of Prince Rupert....

Review by Robert M. Galois


Review

These Mysterious People: Shaping History and Archaeology in a Northwest Coast Community

In the summer of 1968, my grandmother would sometimes take my young aunt and uncle to the northern bank of the outflow of the Fraser River to dig for “Indian treasure” at the Marpole Midden....

Review by Madeline Knickerbocker


Review

People’s Citizenship Guide: A Response to Conservative Canada

People’s Citizenship Guide: A Response to Conservative Canada is just that. It uses Discover Canada, the new Canadian Citizenship Guide, as a launch pad for critiquing the current federal government’s ideological leanings, leanings expressed in...

Review by Elise Chenier


Review

Bella Coola

PDF – Book Reviews, BC Studies 8, Winter 1970

Review by Jean Usher


Review

The Bella Coola Indians, Volumes 1 and 2

PDF – Book Reviews, BC Studies 102, Summer 1994  

Review by Ramsay Cook


Review

Switchbacks: Art, Ownership and Nuxalk National Identity

Jennifer Kramer’s book describes some recent negotiations of public representation and the incipient construction of national identity through the disposition of works of art by the Nuxalk people of Bella Coola, British Columbia. This book...

Review by Judith Ostrowitz


New Media / Exhibition Review

Screen Sovereignty: Indigenous Matriarch 4 Articulating the Future of Indigenous VR

 Indigenous matriarchs are changing the culture of the technology industry through virtual reality (VR). Indigenous Matriarch 4 (IM4) is the first Indigenous virtual reality media lab and is situated on the West Coast. Currently, it...

Review by Courteney Morin


new media technology virtual reality aboriginal art

Review

With Good Intentions: Euro-Canadian and Aboriginal Relations in Colonial Canada

We might as well name the elephant in the room. The editors did. The book’s first sentence, back cover, and promotional material all imply a fear that it will be received as “an apologist text”...

Review by Theodore Binnema


Review

Where the Pavement Ends

Marie Wadden is a non-Aboriginal investigative journalist/network producer for CBC Radio who is based in St. John’s, Newfoundland. In 1981, she shared her home with two Innu youth who came to the city from Sheshatshiu,...

Review by Shelly Johnson


Review

People of the Middle Fraser Canyon: An Archaeological History

The authors, from the departments of anthropology at the University of Montana (Prentiss) and the University of Notre Dame (Kuijt), draw on their extensive and recent archaeological work in the interior of British Columbia to...

Review by Douglas Hudson


Review

Tse-loh-ne (The People at the End of the Rocks): Journey Down the Davie Trail

Keith Billington has had a long career as a nurse in British Columbia and the Yukon as well as being Band Manager for the Fort Ware Sekani/Kaska band (later known as Kwadacha Nation). The first part...

Review by Robin Ridington


Review

Songhees Pictorial: A History of the Songhees People as Seen by Outsiders, 1790-1912

This is a wonderful addition to the history of Aboriginal peoples in British Columbia and Canada. It is unusual because it takes images as the starting point and valuable because the people upon whom it...

Review by John Lutz


Review

Before and After the State: Politics, Poetics, and People(s) in the Pacific Northwest

The authors of Before and After the State: Politics, Poetics, and People(s) in the Pacific Northwest attempt to expand our understanding of the development of two nations, and a border between them, from a mostly political story...

Review by Brandon Dimmel


Review

Saanich Ethnobotany: Culturally Important Plants of the WSANEC People

In Saanich Ethnobotany, Nancy Turner and Richard Hebda describe the land and vegetation of W̱SÁNEĆ (Saanich), examine the “many interrelationships between people and plants” (11), and explore the traditional ecological knowledge that allowed local First...

Review by Andrew Cienski