We acknowledge that we live and work on unceded Indigenous territories and we thank the Musqueam, Squamish and Tsleil-Waututh Nations for their hospitality.

Index

Results (87)

Book Review

In Twilight and in Dawn: A Biography of Diamond Jenness

At last there is a comprehensive biography of Diamond Jenness, perhaps Canada’s greatest anthropologist, and it’s an excellent one. Barnett Richling has risen to the task with a clear understanding of the man, his remarkable...

Review by Robin Ridington


Book Review

People of the Middle Fraser Canyon: An Archaeological History

The authors, from the departments of anthropology at the University of Montana (Prentiss) and the University of Notre Dame (Kuijt), draw on their extensive and recent archaeological work in the interior of British Columbia to...

Review by Douglas Hudson


Book Review

The Cannibal Spirit

Harry Whitehead’s novel The Cannibal Spirit fictionalizes one of the most important figures in the history of BC anthropology, Franz Boas’s long-time collaborator George Hunt. With many points of reference to Joseph Conrad’s Heart of...

Review by Judith Berman


Book Review

The Essentials: 150 Great B.C. Books & Authors

      For this fourth volume in his series on the Literary History of British Columbia, Alan Twigg has set himself the impossible task of  selecting 150 “Great B.C. Books and Authors,” designated as...

Review by Alan Twigg


Book Review

These Mysterious People: Shaping History and Archaeology in a Northwest Coast Community

In the summer of 1968, my grandmother would sometimes take my young aunt and uncle to the northern bank of the outflow of the Fraser River to dig for “Indian treasure” at the Marpole Midden....

Review by Madeline Knickerbocker


Book Review

The Museum of Anthropology at the University of British Columbia

On 23 January 2010 the Museum of Anthropology (MOA) at the University of British Columbia celebrated completion of its ambitious $55.5 million “Partnership of Peoples” renewal project. The expansion included the MOA Centre for Cultural Research,...

Review by Jonathan Clapperton


Book Review

Human Welfare, Rights, and Social Activism: Rethinking the Legacy of J.S. Woodsworth

Human Welfare, Rights, and Social Activism is one of those unique edited volumes in which the whole is indeed greater than the sum of its parts. As suggested in the subtitle, the legacy of J.S. Woodsworth...

Review by Karen Murray


Book Review

Health and Aging in British Columbia: Vulnerability and Resilience

Health and Aging in British Columbia: Vulnerability and Resilience, edited by Denise Cloutier-Fisher, Leslie T. Foster and David Hultsch, is a collection of 17 chapters on health and aging in British Columbia prepared by 30...

Review by James Thornton


Book Review

Early in the Season: A British Columbia Journal

In the summer of 1968, aspiring American novelist Edward Hoagland spent seven weeks in the BC bush, interviewing locals, listening to stories, exploring highways and byways, and chronicling his experiences. He was gathering material for...

Review by Jonathan Peyton


Book Review

The Archive of Place: Unearthing the Pasts of the Chilcotin Plateau

William Turkel grew up in central British Columbia; studied linguistics and psychology before undertaking doctoral studies in history, anthropology, and the Science, Technology and Society Program at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology; and now teaches...

Review by Cole Harris


Book Review

Being and Place among the Tlingit

Being and Place among the Tlingit is a long-awaited book that draws on two decades of the author’s field research in Tlingit country. Working closely with a number of knowledgeable Tlingit elders, younger Aboriginal colleagues,...

Review by Sergi Kan


Book Review

The Importance of Being Monogamous: Marriage and Nation Building in Western Canada to 1915

This sophisticated and engaging book has much to offer a number of scholarly areas, including Canadian history, gender studies, and political and legal studies. Working from a massive bedrock of diverse primary materials, Sarah Carter...

Review by Katie Pickles


Book Review

Extraordinary Anthropology: Transformations in the Field

“Anthropology is unquestionably a discipline with well-known intellectual traditions, or histories … [It is] not a social science tout court, but something else. What that something else is has been notoriously difficult to name, precisely...

Review by Leslie Robertson


Book Review

In the Days of Our Grandmothers: A Reader in Aboriginal Women’s History in Canada

The issue of voice, its recuperation and responsible representation, has long ranked among Aboriginal history’s central concerns. In the Days of Our Grandmothers: A Reader in Aboriginal Women’s History in Canada shares this commitment. Refuting...

Review by Chelsea Horton


Book Review

Cannibal Tours and Glass Boxes: The Anthropology of Museums

PDF – Book Reviews, BC Studies 101, Spring 1994  

Review by Douglas Cole


Book Review

Little Bit Know Something: Stories in a Language of Anthropology

PDF – Book Reviews, BC Studies 91/92, Autumn/Winter 1991/92

Review by Catharine McClellan


Book Review

The Pacific Muse: Exotic Femininity and the Colonial Pacific

In their recent edited collection, Bodies in Contact: Rethinking Colonial Encounters in World History (2005), Tony Ballantyne and Antoinette Burton call for a renewed focus on gender as a category of historical analysis, positioning “the...

Review by Frances Steel


Book Review

Switchbacks: Art, Ownership and Nuxalk National Identity

Jennifer Kramer’s book describes some recent negotiations of public representation and the incipient construction of national identity through the disposition of works of art by the Nuxalk people of Bella Coola, British Columbia. This book...

Review by Judith Ostrowitz


Book Review

Invisible Genealogies: A History of Americanist Anthropology

IT IS FREQUENTLY asserted that contemporary anthropology is distinctive in that it represents a radical, self-conscious departure from its earlier traditions. While accepting that this orientation has been of value particularly in exposing the baggage...

Review by Michael Asch