We acknowledge that we live and work on unceded Indigenous territories and we thank the Musqueam, Squamish and Tsleil-Waututh Nations for their hospitality.

Index

Results (65)

Exhibition, Film, and New Media Review

Screen Sovereignty: Indigenous Matriarch 4 Articulating the Future of Indigenous VR

 Indigenous matriarchs are changing the culture of the technology industry through virtual reality (VR). Indigenous Matriarch 4 (IM4) is the first Indigenous virtual reality media lab and is situated on the West Coast. Currently, it...

Review by Courteney Morin


new media technology virtual reality aboriginal art

Exhibition, Film, and New Media Review

A Tradition of Evolution: The Vancouver Indigenous Media Arts Festival

Vancouver Indigenous Media Arts Festival: Vancouver, British Columbia, 25-26 May 2017. The festival featured film and new media presentations, including a “Turtle Island Shorts” program (May 26); VR and augmented reality presentations (May 27); and...

Review by Carleigh Baker


aboriginal art

Exhibition, Film, and New Media Review

RAVEN (De)Briefs Podcast: Indigenous Law in Action

Season one of the RAVEN (De)Briefs podcast series is a refreshing Indigenization of the traditional podcast format in that it evokes everyday kitchen table conversations among relatives, combined with sonic, Indigenous documentary. Exploring contemporary environmental...

Review by Lydia Toorenburgh


colonialism Delgamuukw v. BC Indigenous Indigenous rights treaties land claims law

this space here

Book Review

Captive Audience: How Corporations Invaded our Schools

Corporate involvement in Canadian schools is an emotional topic. There are alarmists, like some of the teachers’ federations. They long for public education’s halcyon days and warn vaguely of nefarious “neoliberals” set to “privatize.” There...

Review by Jason Ellis


Book Review

Cornelius O’Keefe: the Life, Loves, and Legacy of an Okanagan Rancher

Cornelius O’Keefe was one of a small group of pioneer Okanagan ranchers who managed, in the late nineteenth century, to accumulate land, wealth, and influence. His rags-to-riches story was made possible by a combination of...

Review by Duane Thomson


Book Review

At the Bridge: James Teit and an Anthropology of Belonging

James Teit was an amazing community-based engaged anthropologist long before such labels were invented. Wendy Wickwire’s anthropological life story of Teit is a consummate account and indeed, as the top of page advertisement exhorts, it...

Review by Charles R. Menzies


Book Review

Following the Curve of Time: The Untold Story of Capi Blanchet

Cathy Converse’s Following the Curve of Time: The Untold Story of Capi Blanchet is a companion piece to Blanchet’s coastal travelogue The Curve of Time and one that enriches its reading. Both monographs offer detailed accounts of...

Review by Shirley McDonald


Book Review

Mudflat Dreaming: Waterfront Battles and the Squatters Who Fought them in 1970s Vancouver

Liminal spaces make places. This is the central theme of Jean Walton’s book, Mudflat Dreaming, an unconventional work of literary nonfiction that weaves together memoir, film studies, and Vancouver history in the 1970s, a pivotal...

Review by Kaden Jelsing


Book Review

Raven Walks Around the World

In Raven Walks Around the World, Henley shares parts of his personal journey of activism, travel, and life long work with Indigenous peoples around the world. Through his stories, Henley illuminates the determination of all...

Review by Maggie Low


Book Review

Time Travel: Tourism and the Rise of the Living History Museum in Mid-Twentieth-Century Canada

We all remember them. I know that I do. Having spent a summer in my youth washing dishes at Fort Steele heritage town, I remember the wooden boardwalks, the ramshackle buildings, the yellow school buses...

Review by Sean MacPherson


Book Review

Georgia Straight: A 50th Anniversary Celebration and City on Edge: A Rebellious Century of Vancouver Protests, Riots, and Strikes

Vancouver has always had a volatile streak; it’s a key ingredient of the city’s identity, a theme in the story Vancouverites tell themselves about their place in the world. Perhaps political polarization, western alienation, protests,...

Review by Lani Russwurm


Book Review

The Last Gang in Town: The Epic Story of the Vancouver Police vs. the Clark Park Gang

The past decade has witnessed a surge in Vancouver criminal and nocturnal history, from Daniel Francis’s Red Light Neon (2006) to Diane Purvey and John Belshaw’s Vancouver Noir (2011) and Belshaw’s edited collection Vancouver Confidential...

Review by Matthieu Caron


Book Review

Solitudes of the Workplace: Women in Universities

The essays in Solitudes of the Workplace examine the university as a workplace. The authors use the concept of solitude to examine women’s various experiences as workers in universities. A key premise of the book...

Review by Nancy Janovicek


Book Review

Human Rights in Canada: A History

Human Rights in Canada: A History is a comprehensive survey of the checkered human rights pattern in this country. Dominique Clément writes of a country that in its infancy and youth had a minimal respect...

Review by Larry Hannant


Book Review

How Canadians Communicate V: Sports

The strength of How Canadians Communicate V: Sports is in its storytelling. Exploring Canadian engagement through sports and the media, the authors demonstrate that a powerful story attracts both spectators and readers. Written from multiple...

Review by Jennifer Anderson


Book Review

Tending the Student Body: Youth, Health, and the Modern University

This fine piece of work provides new insights into the way the nature and culture of life in Canadian universities changed during the first sixty years of the twentieth century. Based on a careful review...

Review by Donald Fisher


Book Review

The Amazing Mazie Baker: The Squamish Nation’s Warrior Elder

I grew up ten minutes away from Eslha7án, the Mission Indian Reserve, in what is today known as North Vancouver, which is part of the territory of the Sḵwx̱wú7mesh Úxwumixw or Squamish Nation. Yet I...

Review by Sean Carleton


Book Review

Canadian Counterculture and the Environment

Contemporary environmental debate owes a lot to the counterculture movements of the 1960s, 1970s, and 1980s. This is one of the main contentions of Canadian Countercultures and the Environment, the fourth book published under the...

Review by James Rhatigan