We acknowledge that we live and work on unceded Indigenous territories and we thank the Musqueam, Squamish and Tsleil-Waututh Nations for their hospitality.

Index

Results (96)

Exhibition, Film, and New Media Review

Is the World Wonderful? On Judy Chartrand’s What a Wonderful World

Judy Chartrand: What a Wonderful World on view at the Bill Reid Gallery of Northwest Coast Art, Vancouver, BC, 19 October 2016 – 26 March 2017. Admittedly, I was confused about where the permanent collection...

Review by Allison Adler


art

Exhibition, Film, and New Media Review

Not your usual science: a Future Ecologies Podcast Review

Future Ecologies is not your typical science podcast. Strongly reminiscent of Radiolab (2002–), the renowned WNYC series from the “golden age” of podcasting (Berry 2015), Future Ecologies investigates “the shape of our world,” or the...

Review by Milena Droumeva


Exhibition, Film, and New Media Review

Altering the Landscape of Our Memories: A Review of Indigenous Cities (Vancouver)

I came to x̌ʷay̓x̌ʷəy̓ as a child, not knowing her name, but knowing she had the strength to hold out sharp city noises and the tenderness to hold onto the shy wood duck. To me,...

Review by Nicole Jung


Exhibition, Film, and New Media Review

RAVEN (De)Briefs Podcast: Indigenous Law in Action

Season one of the RAVEN (De)Briefs podcast series is a refreshing Indigenization of the traditional podcast format in that it evokes everyday kitchen table conversations among relatives, combined with sonic, Indigenous documentary. Exploring contemporary environmental...

Review by Lydia Toorenburgh


colonialism Delgamuukw v. BC Indigenous Indigenous rights treaties land claims law

Exhibition, Film, and New Media Review

Crackdown

British Columbia is in year four of a provincial public health emergency declared in response to devastating rates of drug overdose deaths resulting from a toxic, illicit drug supply. As of July 2020, COVID-19 had...

Review by Kendra Milne


epidemics liquor and drugs mental health social services substance use government law public policy

Exhibition, Film, and New Media Review

Now Is the Time

In the extraordinary short film Now Is the Time, Haida filmmaker Christopher Auchter brings to the screen a moving story of renewal through the restoration and re-editing of footage from the National Film Board of...

Review by Kristin L. Dowell


museums repatriation aboriginal self government colonialism settler colonialism aboriginal art aboriginal rights Haida Indigenous worlds

Exhibition, Film, and New Media Review

When the City Sleeps, We Dream of Disruption: A Review of Lisa Jackson’s Transmissions Exhibition

Lisa Jackson’s exhibition entitled Transmissions premiered at the Simon Fraser University’s Vancouver campus from 6–28 September 2019. This new body of work weaves interdisciplinary themes regarding society, nature, Indigenous languages, and ecological futures. Lisa Jackson is Anishinaabe from the Aamjiwnaang First Nation and...

Review by Karlene Harvey


Aboriginal languages environment urbanization

Book Review

Against the Current and Into the Light: Performing History and Land in Coast Salish Territories and Vancouver’s Stanley Park

Coast Salish Indigenous people never ceded their lands and resources to settlers and have always asserted their sovereignty. Over time, those assertions have taken various forms: petitions, protests, litigation. There have also been cultural assertions...

Review by Sean Kheraj


Book Review

Civilian Internment in Canada: Histories and Legacies

“There is no single historiography of internment” in Canada, write Rhonda L. Hinter and Jim Mochoruk in the introduction of this ambitious collection of essays (9-10). Siloed histories of particular internments, they suggest, convey episodic...

Review by Jordan Stanger-Ross


Book Review

Unmooring The Komagata Maru: Charting Colonial Trajectories

From food (Valenze, 2012) to crops (Ali 2020, Rappaport 2019) to commodities (Curry-Machado, 2013) to digital cultures (Punathambekar and Mohan, 2019) and to empires (Bayly, 2003; Hopkins, 2003) there has been a steady scholarly commitment to...

Review by Dharitri Bhattacharjee


Book Review

At the Wilderness Edge: The Rise of the Antidevelopment Movement on Canada’s West Coast

In recent years, local opposition to the expansion of the Trans Mountain Pipeline in BC has confounded the plans of oil investors and federal officials alike. The government of Alberta has declared its right to...

Review by Jason M. Colby


Book Review

Service on the Skeena: Horace Wrinch, Frontier Physician

Although both Horace C. Wrinch and his wife Alice are featured in Eldon Lee’s Scalpels and Buggywhips (1997), Horace Wrinch is little known, despite his extraordinary contributions to British Columbia society. Geoff Mynett, a retired lawyer...

Review by Ted Binnema


Book Review

Talking Back to the Indian Act: Critical Readings in Settler Colonial Histories

History as an academic discipline recognizes that how we understand the past is no more than that. It is how we understand the past, and not necessarily what actually transpired in distant times that we...

Review by David Milward


Book Review

Nothing to Write Home About: British Family Correspondence and the Settler Everyday in British Columbia

The history of colonial British Columbia is, in many respects, well-trodden ground. Over the past few decades, scholars like Jean Barman, Cole Harris, and Adele Perry have made multiple transformative contributions to our understanding of...

Review by Kristine Alexander


Book Review

Stories from the Magic Canoe of Wa’xaid

The Story of the Wa’xaid’s (Xenakaisla elder Cecil Paul) Magic Canoe is well known throughout some circles. From coastal rain forest conservation groups to International Indigenous networks, Cecil Paul has been invited to tell his...

Review by Bruce Erickson


Book Review

Sonny Assu: A Selective History

This comprehensive survey of Sonny Assu’s work is prefaced by four incisive essays by prominent indigenous scholars and curators. This beautifully designed and thoughtfully organized book covers significant phases in the Kwakwaka’ wakw artist’s career,...

Review by Alexandra Phillips


Book Review

A Queer Love Story: The Letters of Jane Rule and Rick Bébout

If this is a queer love story between Jane Rule, the legendary lesbian novelist of Galiano Island, and Rick Bébout, a long-time collective member of The Body Politic in Toronto, it should really be considered a...

Review by Steven Maynard


Book Review

Coming Home to Indigenous Place Names in Canada

Coming Home to Indigenous Place Names in Canada is a fold-out display-ready wall map of Canada, hypsometrically tinted to highlight the physiographic landscape of the northern portion of North America, and labeled entirely and only in...

Review by Ken Brealey


Book Review

Mudflat Dreaming: Waterfront Battles and the Squatters Who Fought them in 1970s Vancouver

Liminal spaces make places. This is the central theme of Jean Walton’s book, Mudflat Dreaming, an unconventional work of literary nonfiction that weaves together memoir, film studies, and Vancouver history in the 1970s, a pivotal...

Review by Kaden Jelsing


Book Review

Witness to Loss

Witness to Loss is a multi-authored study of wartime Japanese Canadian confinement that draws from the memoirs of Kishizo Kimura, a Japanese-born man who immigrated to Canada in 1911. Kimura had an important impact on the...

Review by Christian Roy