We acknowledge that we live and work on unceded Indigenous territories and we thank the Musqueam, Squamish and Tsleil-Waututh Nations for their hospitality.

Index

Results (151)

review essay

Exhibition, Film, and New Media Review

The Body Remembers When the World Broke Open 

Though many will recognize Elle-Máijá Tailfeathers for her remarkable body of short and documentary films (Bloodland [2011], A Red Girl’s Reasoning [2012], Bihttoš [2014], cəsnaʔəm, the city before the city [2017]), The Body Remembers When the World Broke Open (2019)...

Review by Karrmen Crey


Exhibition, Film, and New Media Review

Crackdown

British Columbia is in year four of a provincial public health emergency declared in response to devastating rates of drug overdose deaths resulting from a toxic, illicit drug supply. As of July 2020, COVID-19 had...

Review by Kendra Milne


epidemics liquor and drugs mental health social services substance use government law public policy

Exhibition, Film, and New Media Review

Sq’éwlets: A Stó:lo-Coast Salish Community in the Fraser River Valley Virtual Museum

Sq’éwlets: A Stó:lō -Coast Salish Community in the Fraser River Valley (Stó:lō Research and Resource Management Centre and Stó:lō Nation, 2016) is a virtual museum in the form of a website that reflects a collaborative...

Review by Dara Kelly


Sto:lo

Exhibition, Film, and New Media Review

Screen Sovereignty: Indigenous Matriarch 4 Articulating the Future of Indigenous VR

 Indigenous matriarchs are changing the culture of the technology industry through virtual reality (VR). Indigenous Matriarch 4 (IM4) is the first Indigenous virtual reality media lab and is situated on the West Coast. Currently, it...

Review by Courteney Morin


new media technology virtual reality aboriginal art

article

Tenant Organizing and the Campaign for Collective Bargaining Rights in British Columbia, 1968–75

By Tenant Organizing and the Campaign for Collective Bargaining Rights in British Columbia, 1968–75


housing real estate legislation politics

photo essay

Book Review

Planning on the Edge: Vancouver and the Challenges of Reconciliation, Social Justice and Sustainable Development

Planning on the Edge: Vancouver and the Challenges of Reconciliation, Social Justice, and Sustainable Development (2019) is a compelling edited collection written from an interdisciplinary perspective. The book treats the state of metropolitan Vancouver’s development as...

Review by Ian Rocksborough-Smith


Book Review

Outside In: A Political Memoir

Outside In can be read and enjoyed as a straightforward memoir of Libby Davies’ remarkable career as an activist and elected official.  It traces her path from her early days working for housing justice in Vancouver’s...

Review by Gord Perks


Book Review

By Law or In Justice

The foundation of Professor Jane Dickson’s book, By Law Or in Justice, is her work as a Commissioner for the Indian Specific Claims Commission, from 2002 to 2009. The Commission itself endured from 1991 to...

Review by David Milward


Book Review

Medicine Unbundled: A Journey through the Minefields of Indigenous Health Care

Medicine Unbundled by Gary Geddes is a humanistic look at the survivors from one of our nation’s most shameful institutions alongside residential schools: segregated healthcare facilities and the treatment of Indigenous peoples within these spaces....

Review by Nicole M. Schafenacker


Book Review

Uncertain Accommodation: Aboriginal Identity and Group Rights in the Supreme Court of Canada

The Supreme Court of Canada’s approach to Aboriginal identity is fraudulent and harmful to Indigenous peoples in Canada.  This is essentially the conclusion reached by Professor Panagos in his new book.  Although this conclusion is...

Review by Larry Chartrand


Book Review

Ranch in the Slocan: A Biography of a Kootenay Farm, 1896 – 2017

Cole Harris’s Ranch in the Slocan: A Biography of a Kootenay Farm, 1896 – 2017 is delightful summer reading. It is, primarily, a history of the Harris family’s Bosun Ranch and a record of the lives of...

Review by Shirley McDonald


Book Review

​Emily Patterson: The Heroic Life of a Milltown Nurse

In Emily Patterson: The Heroic Life of a Milltown Nurse, Lisa Smith transports the reader to late nineteenth century Pacific Northwest and evocatively offers a history of an extraordinary woman living through extraordinary times. Born in...

Review by Jane Errington


Book Review

The Promise of Paradise: Utopian Communities in British Columbia

My childhood vacations did not involve the sophisticated technology that keeps my children (relatively) quiet in the backseat today. Apart from what I recall to be my endless patience on those long and winding drives...

Review by Darcy Ingram


Book Review

The W̲SÁNEĆ and Their Neighbours: Diamond Jenness on the Coast Salish of Vancouver Island, 1935

Anthropologist Rolf Knight launched a new chapter of Indigenous history in 1978 with the publication of his book, Indians at Work: An Informal History of Native Indian Labour in British Columbia, 1858-1930.[1]  In contrast to...

Review by Wendy Wickwire


Book Review

Imagining Uplands: John Olmsted’s Masterpiece of Residential Design

This is a most handsome book, and a most intelligent analysis of the dense process of realizing a design concept. Larry McCann has allowed his telling of the Uplands history to be imaginative, if not...

Review by Rhodri Windsor Liscombe


Book Review

In the Spirit of Homebirth: Modern Women, An Ancient Choice

This edited volume of modern BC birthing stories will be a compelling read for anyone with a personal or professional interest in the rich drama of childbirth. Not intended as a scholarly text, the sixty...

Review by Megan J. Davies


Book Review

The Peace in Peril: The Real Cost of the Site C Dam

Anything written about the Site C dam in the past year or two was bound to become dated rapidly, given the pace of events, the uncertainty around the future of the project after the 2017...

Review by Matthew Evenden


Book Review

Maximum Canada: Why 35 Million Canadians Are Not Enough

Anyone with even the most superficial knowledge of eugenics, racism, the ‘domestication’ of women, and the history of the 20th century will know why pronatalism might ring the wrong bells. And this is setting aside...

Review by John Douglas Belshaw