We acknowledge that we live and work on unceded Indigenous territories and we thank the Musqueam, Squamish and Tsleil-Waututh Nations for their hospitality.

Index

Results (71)

Book Review

Seeing Red: A History of Natives in Canadian Newspapers

Seeing Red is a tough read. It’s tough because the sheer amount of data gathered from Canadian newspapers ends up, at times, reading like endless lists of information, rather than a coherent narrative, argument, or...

Review by Hadley Friedland


Book Review

Nationalism from the Margins: Italians in Alberta and British Columbia

According to Patricia Wood, ethnic studies in Canada – or at least the study of Italian immigrants and their descendants – is at best a marginal or fringe activity in the Canadian academy. She complains,...

Review by Gabriele Scardellato


Book Review

Georgia Straight: A 50th Anniversary Celebration and City on Edge: A Rebellious Century of Vancouver Protests, Riots, and Strikes

Vancouver has always had a volatile streak; it’s a key ingredient of the city’s identity, a theme in the story Vancouverites tell themselves about their place in the world. Perhaps political polarization, western alienation, protests,...

Review by Lani Russwurm


Book Review

Settler Anxiety at the Outposts of Empire: Colonial Relations, Humanitarian Discourses and the Imperial Press

In May 1861, the British Colonist, a local newspaper in Victoria, Vancouver Island, reported on a “Horrid Massacre in New Zealand.” According to the Colonist, Maori warriors had launched a surprise attack on a small...

Review by Robert Hogg


Book Review

The Ones Who Have to Pay: The Soldiers-Poets of Victoria BC in the Great War 1914-1918

Robert Ratcliffe Taylor’s study of the soldier-poets of the First World War is useful for scholarship and is approachable by a casual reader. Although the tone of this review must be critical, the utility and...

Review by James Gifford


Book Review

Making Headlines: 100 Years of the Vancouver Sun

The Vancouver Sun turned one hundred in 2012. To mark this event, reporter Shelley Fralic compiled a (roughly) chronological account of goings-on in the city and at the paper itself. It is not so much...

Review by John Belshaw


Book Review

Making the News: A Times Colonist Look at 150 Years of History

Dave Obee states in the introduction to this book that his purpose is to “give you glimpses of the people and events that shaped our community and our province” (1). In this goal, Obee succeeds...

Review by Kenton Storey


Book Review

The Amazing Foot Race of 1921: Halifax to Vancouver in 134 Days

Three teams left Halifax in a 3,645-mile pedestrian race to Vancouver in 1921. Amateur sportsman Charles Burkman was first to head west on 17 January, followed a few days later by Jack and Clifford Behan,...

Review by PearlAnn Reichwein


Book Review

The Land on Which We Live: Life on the Cariboo Plateau: 70 Mile House to Bridge Lake

In recent years, the historiography of British Columbia has burgeoned. Much of this rich and growing scholarship focuses on the province as a whole, or on its urban centres. We still have much to learn...

Review by Tina Block


Book Review

Seeing Reds: The Red Scare of 1918-1919, Canada’s First War on Terror

In Seeing Reds: The Red Scare of 1918-1919, Canada’s First War on Terror, Daniel Francis provides an overview of the response of the Canadian state and elite to the postwar labour revolt. Although written for...

Review by Duff Sutherland


Book Review

Labour Goes to War: The CIO and the Construction of a New Social Order, 1939-45

Labour Goes to War is a welcome new study whose title promises readers an analysis of the major industrial union organizing drive led by the Congress of Industrial Organizations (CIO) during the Second World War....

Review by Ron Verzuh


Book Review

Welcome to Resisterville: American Dissidents in British Columbia

Just about every kid who grew up in British Columbia in the 1980s had a friend (or a friend of a friend) whose parents were American immigrants. Their parents usually arrived in the province sometime...

Review by Sean Kheraj


Book Review

Bringing Water to Victoria: An Illustrated History, 1843-1915

Little is as intimate and political as the water that flows from city taps. We fill our bodies with it, we wash our babies in it. Many of us depend on the state to provide...

Review by Adele Perry


Book Review

Constance Lindsay Skinner: Writing on the Frontier

THE SUBTITLE of this biography has several meanings. Constance Lindsay Skinner (1877-1939) lived on a variety of frontiers – geographical, social, literary, and imaginative. Skinner occupies a minor place in the canon of American literature...

Review by Margaret Prang


Book Review

Stella: Unrepentant Madam

Linda Eversole’s biography of Victoria madam Stella Carroll (1872-1946) is listed on the book cover as fitting into two genres: “creative non-fiction” and “history.” It’s an interesting division for an interesting book. Having spent more...

Review by Jenea Tallentire


Book Review

The Aquaculture Controversy in Canada: Activism, Policy, and Contested Science

There are few issues in British Columbia more divisive than aquaculture. With their new book, Nathan Young and Ralph Matthews provide a timely, well-documented, and clearly articulated step back from the aquaculture fray. The impetus...

Review by Jaime Yard


Book Review

Harold Mortimer-Lamb: The Art Lover

Harold Mortimer-Lamb lived an extraordinary life — all ninety-nine years of it. Born in England in 1872, he came to British Columbia at the age of seventeen, initially to work on Captain L.N. Agassiz’s Fraser...

Review by Maria Tippett


Book Review

Always Someone to Kill the Doves: A Life of Sheila Watson

Like Sheila Watson’s seminal – and quintessentially British Columbian – novel, The Double Hook, F.T. Flahiff’s book takes both its title and its epigraph from a particularly dramatic and thematically relevant moment in its text....

Review by Ginny Ratsoy


Book Review

Burlesque West: Showgirls, Sex, and Sin in Postwar Vancouver

Feather boas and glamorous stage shows, breast implants and stripper poles: these images of postwar Vancouver nightlife in Burlesque West reflect the contradictory cultural status of striptease. Although striptease was defined by various experts as...

Review by Lara Campbell


Book Review

Lillian Alling: The Journey Home

In 1929, Lillian Alling reached the coast of Alaska on her way to Siberia. Her three-year walk across North America began in New York City and ended at Cape Wales where her footsteps disappeared after...

Review by PearlAnn Reichwein


Book Review

Sojourning Sisters: The Lives and Letters of Jessie and Annie McQueen

JEAN BARMAN’S Soujourning Sisters is an important book that merits a wide audience, consisting of both those interested specifically in British Columbia and those interested in Canadian history writ large. It recasts the notion of...

Review by Suzanne Morton