We acknowledge that we live and work on unceded Indigenous territories and we thank the Musqueam, Squamish and Tsleil-Waututh Nations for their hospitality.

Index

Results (422)

Book Review

Our Backs Warmed By The Sun: Memories of a Doukhobor Life

In Our Backs Warmed By The Sun: Memories of a Doukhobor Life, Vera Maloff recounts the lives of several generations of the Maloff-Hoodicoff family who, for much of the previous century, farmed in Thrums, a...

Review by Duff Sutherland


Book Review

Standoff: Why Reconciliation Fails Indigenous People and How to Fix It

Given the failure of constitutional negotiations to define the meaning of Aboriginal rights and title recognized in Section 35 of the Canadian Constitution – a failure that marks the recalcitrance of provincial and federal governments...

Review by Corey Snelgrove


Exhibition, Film, and New Media Review

Mission Transition: Clean Energy and Beyond (Season 1 and 2)

In 2018 and 2019, Sierra Club BC, through the leadership of Caitlyn Vernon and former CBC host and broadcaster, Susan Elrington, released an episodic educational podcast resource called Mission Transition: Clean Energy and Beyond.  This...

Review by Nick Stanger


Book Review

Mischief Making: Michael Nicoll Yahgulanaas, Art and the Seriousness of Play

Celebrated contemporary Haida artist, Michael Nicoll Yahgulanaas has produced a diverse body of work ranging from ink drawings to large scale mixed media sculptures to totem poles. The artist is best known for inventing a...

Review by Bryan Myles


Book Review

Deadly Neighbours: A Tale of Colonialism, Cattle Feuds, Murder and Vigilantes in the Far West

Deadly Neighbours opens a window into the relationship between immigrant settlers and the Sema:th (Sumas) and Sto:lo people residing in British Columbia’s Sumas Prairie and Nooksack Valley during the 1870s and 1880s.  Several conflicts are...

Review by Janet Nicol


Exhibition, Film, and New Media Review

Sounds Japanese Canadian to Me

Sounds Japanese Canadian to Me is a monthly podcast on Japanese Canadian history and culture. Produced and hosted by Raymond Nakamura and staff of the Nikkei National Museum, the episodes are structured as a casual...

Review by Carin Holroyd


Book Review

Solidarity: Canada’s Unknown Revolution of 1983

This is a book in search of a genre. As history, the curtain comes down on this story after a disappointing first night. But as theatre, it would undoubtedly have a longer and more satisfying...

Review by Bryan D. Palmer


Exhibition, Film, and New Media Review

Now Is the Time

In the extraordinary short film Now Is the Time, Haida filmmaker Christopher Auchter brings to the screen a moving story of renewal through the restoration and re-editing of footage from the National Film Board of...

Review by Kristin L. Dowell


museums repatriation aboriginal self government colonialism settler colonialism aboriginal art aboriginal rights Haida Indigenous worlds

Book Review

Beyond Rights: The Nisga’a Final Agreement and the Challenges of Modern Treaty Relationships

Most Canadians are aware of the existence of treaties between Indigenous peoples and the Crown. Phrases like “treaty rights” and “treaty relationships” form part of the everyday political vocabulary at every level of our federal...

Review by Joshua Nichols


Exhibition, Film, and New Media Review

Crackdown

British Columbia is in year four of a provincial public health emergency declared in response to devastating rates of drug overdose deaths resulting from a toxic, illicit drug supply. As of July 2020, COVID-19 had...

Review by Kendra Milne


epidemics liquor and drugs mental health social services substance use government law public policy

Book Review

Joseph William McKay: A Métis Business Leader in Colonial British Columbia

In 2003, the Canadian Supreme Court handed down its decision in the case of R. v. Powley, triggering significant new public interest in Métis identity and history outside of the familiar geography of the Canadian...

Review by Carla A. Osborne


Book Review

A Great Revolutionary Wave: Women and the Vote in British Columbia

A core rationale for this book series, Lara Campbell explains, is the necessity to “tell regional stories” about the women’s suffrage movement (13). Campbell demonstrates, for example, that the absence of a party system in...

Review by Barbara J. Messamore


Book Review

Kropotkin and Canada

In this translated monograph, Alexey Gennadievich Ivanov depicts the travels of the famous anarchist theoretician Peter Alexeyevich Kropotkin (1842-1921) in Canada during 1897. Drawing on a recently uncovered archive, Ivanov details Kropotkin’s impressions of Canada,...

Review by Yotam Ronen


Book Review

The Bomb in the Wilderness: Photography and the Nuclear Era in Canada

John O’Brian’s recent book on the photographic representation of the nuclear age focuses on the Canadian context and readers with an interest in photography, atomic age culture, and Canadiana will not be disappointed. The Bomb...

Review by Karla McManus


Book Review

Resolve: The Story of the Chelsea Family and a First Nation Community’s Will to Heal

The remains of residential schools are scattered throughout Canada. Indeed, there are only three provinces (Prince Edward Island, New Brunswick, and Newfoundland) that did not house residential schools. There is not an Indigenous community, family,...

Review by Heather MacLeod


Book Review

Able to Lead: Disablement, Radicalism, and the Political Life of E.T. Kingsley

Eugene Thornton Kingsley, an influential socialist in early British Columbia, was 33 years old when he adopted his revolutionary stance.  Employed as a brakeman on a railway in rural Montana in 1890, he fell between...

Review by Janet Nicol


Book Review

Fool’s Gold: The Life and Legacy of Vancouver’s Official Town Fool

Once upon an acid-warped time, Vancouver had its own town fool. In the late sixties, a middle-aged family man, Kim Foikis, dressed in a red and blue jester’s outfit and led his donkeys, Peter and...

Review by David Hazzan