We acknowledge that we live and work on unceded Indigenous territories and we thank the Musqueam, Squamish and Tsleil-Waututh Nations for their hospitality.

Index

Results (40)

Exhibition, Film, and New Media Review

Now Is the Time

In the extraordinary short film Now Is the Time, Haida filmmaker Christopher Auchter brings to the screen a moving story of renewal through the restoration and re-editing of footage from the National Film Board of...

Review by Kristin L. Dowell


museums repatriation aboriginal self government colonialism settler colonialism aboriginal art aboriginal rights Haida Indigenous worlds

Exhibition, Film, and New Media Review

Crackdown

British Columbia is in year four of a provincial public health emergency declared in response to devastating rates of drug overdose deaths resulting from a toxic, illicit drug supply. As of July 2020, COVID-19 had...

Review by Kendra Milne


epidemics liquor and drugs mental health social services substance use government law public policy

Exhibition, Film, and New Media Review

RAVEN (De)Briefs Podcast: Indigenous Law in Action

Season one of the RAVEN (De)Briefs podcast series is a refreshing Indigenization of the traditional podcast format in that it evokes everyday kitchen table conversations among relatives, combined with sonic, Indigenous documentary. Exploring contemporary environmental...

Review by Lydia Toorenburgh


colonialism Delgamuukw v. BC Indigenous Indigenous rights treaties land claims law

Book Review

He Speaks Volumes: A Biography of George Bowering

The Canadian writers who rose (or leapt) to prominence in the 1960s and 1970s, and who are sometimes thought to be synonymous with Canadian literature itself, are now venerable. Although Margaret Atwood remains a formidable...

Review by Nicholas Bradley


Book Review

Spirits of the Coast: Orcas in Science, Art and History

As I write, the world has received news that Talequah (or J35), the Southern Resident killer whale who carried her dead newborn for two weeks in 2018, is pregnant again. Spirits of the Coast: Orcas...

Review by Meghan Walley


Book Review

Postsecondary Education in British Columbia: Public Policy and Structural Development, 1960-2015

As distinct from previous historical accounts of postsecondary education in BC, Cowin makes it clear that he will cover the development of the “entire” postsecondary system in BC (3). For Cowin, this means the whole...

Review by Donald Fisher


Book Review

UBC: The Next Century

To begin, this review must clarify that this book has a misleading title. The book has been published to mark UBC’s 100th anniversary (technically in 2015), and the title promises it will explore UBC’s future....

Review by Dale M. McCartney


Book Review

At the Wilderness Edge: The Rise of the Antidevelopment Movement on Canada’s West Coast

In recent years, local opposition to the expansion of the Trans Mountain Pipeline in BC has confounded the plans of oil investors and federal officials alike. The government of Alberta has declared its right to...

Review by Jason M. Colby


Book Review

Engaging the Line: How the Great War Shaped the Canada-US Border 

That the Great War changed boundaries and upset communities is not news to anyone who looks at an historical atlas of Europe.  That the war affected communities living along what is often referred to as ‘the...

Review by Chris Leach


article

Regional patterns of substance use in the homeless in British Columbia

By Isabelle Aube Linden, Gregory R Werker, Christian G Schutz, Marissa Y Mar, Michael Krausz, Kerry Jang


homelessness liquor and drugs substance use Prince George Vancouver Victoria

Book Review

The Last Gang in Town: The Epic Story of the Vancouver Police vs. the Clark Park Gang

The past decade has witnessed a surge in Vancouver criminal and nocturnal history, from Daniel Francis’s Red Light Neon (2006) to Diane Purvey and John Belshaw’s Vancouver Noir (2011) and Belshaw’s edited collection Vancouver Confidential...

Review by Matthieu Caron


Book Review

How Canadians Communicate V: Sports

The strength of How Canadians Communicate V: Sports is in its storytelling. Exploring Canadian engagement through sports and the media, the authors demonstrate that a powerful story attracts both spectators and readers. Written from multiple...

Review by Jennifer Anderson


Book Review

When Good Drugs Go Bad: Opium, Medicine, and the Origins of Canada’s Drug Laws

This is a story of contested authority. Dan Malleck has drawn from legal, medical, newspaper, policy, and pharmacy perspectives to explore the shifting conceptualizations of opium addiction and regulation in nineteenth century Canada. In some...

Review by Erika Dyck


Book Review

Bootleggers and Borders: The Paradox of Prohibition on a Canada-US Borderland

Given how contentious relations between Canada and the US became during the American Prohibition era (1917-1933), it is surprising how little scholarly work has been done on the subject. There are many popular books about...

Review by Daniel Francis


Book Review

The Afterthought: West Coast Rock Posters and Recollections

Jerry Kruz’s beautifully illustrated autobiographical work provides an intriguing first hand glimpse of Vancouver psychedelic music scene. The book revolves around Kruz’s years as a concert promoter from 1966 to 1969. Although it briefly describes...

Review by Henry Trim


Book Review

Closing Time: Prohibition, Rum-Runners, and Border Wars

The prohibition era has attracted much interest for generations. The American story — undoubtedly because of the violence, criminal involvement, and Hollywood exposure — has always overshadowed the somewhat milder, more complicated, and less linear...

Review by Wayne Norton


Book Review

The Fisher Queen: A Deckhand’s Tales of the BC Coast

Promoting an upcoming reading of Don Pepper’s A Life on the Water at the Vancouver Maritime Museum, Harbour Publishing exclaims: “Here, finally, is a book about commercial salmon fishing through the eyes of a commercial...

Review by Molly Clarkson


Book Review

Debating Dissent: Canada and the Sixties

Generation has dominated sixties scholarship since the baby-boomers came of age in the 1960s. Early historical scholarship, often written by those who participated in the events, emphasized a rupture with the past. These writers focused...

Review by Nancy Janovicek