We acknowledge that we live and work on unceded Indigenous territories and we thank the Musqueam, Squamish and Tsleil-Waututh Nations for their hospitality.

Index

Results (181)

Book Review

Okanagan Women’s Voices: Syilx and Settler Writing and Relations, 1870s – 1960s

The “truth” of British Columbia’s history has yet to be fleshed out, with many active participants’ voices un-accounted for. This is particularly true regarding certain facts of Indigenous-settler relations that can be best understood through...

Review by Kerrie Charnley


Book Review

So You Girls Remember That: Memories of a Haida Elder

Every morning when I build the fire and when it start to go, if it’s scattered over, you have to poke it and put it together and it start to go. That’s the way life...

Review by Leslie A. Robertson


Exhibition, Film, and New Media Review

Below the Radar: Age of Engagement

Below the Radar is the voice of Simon Fraser University’s community engagement initiative. The host, Am Johal, has been a fixture in Vancouver public affairs for several decades. He is currently Director of SFU’s Vancity...

Review by John Belec


Exhibition, Film, and New Media Review

Below the Radar: An Engaged Knowledge Democracy

Below the Radar is a podcast that begins many episodes by reminding listeners that it is a knowledge democracy podcast.  A production of Simon Fraser University’s Vancity Office of Community Engagement, the podcast claims to...

Review by Brian Davenport


Exhibition, Film, and New Media Review

Celebrating the Indigenous-Filipino Community on Bainbridge Island and the Indigenous Women Who Brought it into Being: A Review of Honor Thy Mother

The field of Indigenous studies is being called on with urgency to listen to, center, and amplify the voices and experiences of multiracial, multiethnic Indigenous community members beyond whiteness, especially the important voices and experiences...

Review by Ashley Caranto Morford


Exhibition, Film, and New Media Review

Altering the Landscape of Our Memories: A Review of Indigenous Cities (Vancouver)

I came to x̌ʷay̓x̌ʷəy̓ as a child, not knowing her name, but knowing she had the strength to hold out sharp city noises and the tenderness to hold onto the shy wood duck. To me,...

Review by Nicole Jung


Book Review

What Was Said to Me: The Life of Sti’tum’atul’wut, a Cowichan Woman

Stories are a gift. When someone shares their story with us, it is an offering to know them, to know what it means to be them, to know ourselves and our society. Ruby Peter’s book...

Review by Georgia Sitara


Book Review

The Bomb in the Wilderness: Photography and the Nuclear Era in Canada

John O’Brian’s recent book on the photographic representation of the nuclear age focuses on the Canadian context and readers with an interest in photography, atomic age culture, and Canadiana will not be disappointed. The Bomb...

Review by Karla McManus


Exhibition, Film, and New Media Review

When the City Sleeps, We Dream of Disruption: A Review of Lisa Jackson’s Transmissions Exhibition

Lisa Jackson’s exhibition entitled Transmissions premiered at the Simon Fraser University’s Vancouver campus from 6–28 September 2019. This new body of work weaves interdisciplinary themes regarding society, nature, Indigenous languages, and ecological futures. Lisa Jackson is Anishinaabe from the Aamjiwnaang First Nation and...

Review by Karlene Harvey


Aboriginal languages environment urbanization

Book Review

Luschiim’s Plants: Traditional Indigenous Foods, Materials and Medicines

This is a beautiful collaboration between Drs. Luschiim Arvid Charlie and Nancy Turner. The book is an album and encyclopedia which identifies the different plants located within the Quw’utsun territory. After a brief introduction to...

Review by Agnieszka Pawlowska-Mainville


Exhibition, Film, and New Media Review

Screen Sovereignty: Indigenous Matriarch 4 Articulating the Future of Indigenous VR

 Indigenous matriarchs are changing the culture of the technology industry through virtual reality (VR). Indigenous Matriarch 4 (IM4) is the first Indigenous virtual reality media lab and is situated on the West Coast. Currently, it...

Review by Courteney Morin


new media technology virtual reality aboriginal art

Exhibition, Film, and New Media Review

Reflexive Anthropology on Display: Franz Boas, George Hunt, and the Co-Production of Ethnographic Knowledge

  A portion of an 1897 letter from Franz Boas to Kwagu’ł Chiefs, reproduced in English and Kwak’wala, opens The Story Box: Franz Boas, George Hunt and the Making of Anthropology, an exhibition on view...

Review by Christopher T. Green


Kwakwaka'wakw U'mista Cultural Centre Boas Franz George Hunt

Exhibition, Film, and New Media Review

Is the World Wonderful? On Judy Chartrand’s What a Wonderful World

Judy Chartrand: What a Wonderful World on view at the Bill Reid Gallery of Northwest Coast Art, Vancouver, BC, 19 October 2016 – 26 March 2017. Admittedly, I was confused about where the permanent collection...

Review by Allison Adler


art

Exhibition, Film, and New Media Review

A Tradition of Evolution: The Vancouver Indigenous Media Arts Festival

Vancouver Indigenous Media Arts Festival: Vancouver, British Columbia, 25-26 May 2017. The festival featured film and new media presentations, including a “Turtle Island Shorts” program (May 26); VR and augmented reality presentations (May 27); and...

Review by Carleigh Baker


aboriginal art

Exhibition, Film, and New Media Review

Sq’éwlets: A Stó:lo-Coast Salish Community in the Fraser River Valley Virtual Museum

Sq’éwlets: A Stó:lō -Coast Salish Community in the Fraser River Valley (Stó:lō Research and Resource Management Centre and Stó:lō Nation, 2016) is a virtual museum in the form of a website that reflects a collaborative...

Review by Dara Kelly


Sto:lo

Exhibition, Film, and New Media Review

Konelīne: our land beautiful

As the language and culture director for the Tahltan Nation and a Tahltan academic, I believe giving voice to our people is crucial. Until recent times, the academy has privileged the voices of settlers and...

Review by Matthew Gartner


Book Review

The Theatre of Regret: Literature, Art, and the Politics of Reconciliation in Canada

In The Theatre of Regret: Literature, Art and the Politics of Reconciliation in Canada, David Gaertner, an academic author and settler-scholar, centres Indigenous literary and artistic works to contribute to critiques of reconciliation. The book is a...

Review by Christine Añonuevo


Book Review

Against the Current and Into the Light: Performing History and Land in Coast Salish Territories and Vancouver’s Stanley Park

Coast Salish Indigenous people never ceded their lands and resources to settlers and have always asserted their sovereignty. Over time, those assertions have taken various forms: petitions, protests, litigation. There have also been cultural assertions...

Review by Sean Kheraj


Book Review

Cataline: The Life of BC’s Legendary Packer

The early history of British Columbia is replete with enigmatic and unusual figures but few rival the man popularly known as Cataline. Anyone who has spent time exploring the history of the province will have...

Review by Christopher Herbert


Book Review

Fishes of the Salish Sea

Having studied fish for more than 40 years, I have accumulated more than 50 “fishes of…” books, latitudinally arranged on my office shelf, and none of them can compare in the quality, quantity, and aesthetics...

Review by Leo Bodensteiner


Book Review

Unmooring The Komagata Maru: Charting Colonial Trajectories

From food (Valenze, 2012) to crops (Ali 2020, Rappaport 2019) to commodities (Curry-Machado, 2013) to digital cultures (Punathambekar and Mohan, 2019) and to empires (Bayly, 2003; Hopkins, 2003) there has been a steady scholarly commitment to...

Review by Dharitri Bhattacharjee


Book Review

Spirits of the Coast: Orcas in Science, Art and History

As I write, the world has received news that Talequah (or J35), the Southern Resident killer whale who carried her dead newborn for two weeks in 2018, is pregnant again. Spirits of the Coast: Orcas...

Review by Meghan Walley