We acknowledge that we live and work on unceded Indigenous territories and we thank the Musqueam, Squamish and Tsleil-Waututh Nations for their hospitality.

Index

Results (424)

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Exhibition, Film, and New Media Review

Sq’éwlets: A Stó:lo-Coast Salish Community in the Fraser River Valley Virtual Museum

Sq’éwlets: A Stó:lō -Coast Salish Community in the Fraser River Valley (Stó:lō Research and Resource Management Centre and Stó:lō Nation, 2016) is a virtual museum in the form of a website that reflects a collaborative...

Review by Dara Kelly


Sto:lo

Exhibition, Film, and New Media Review

Celebrating the Indigenous-Filipino Community on Bainbridge Island and the Indigenous Women Who Brought it into Being: A Review of Honor Thy Mother

The field of Indigenous studies is being called on with urgency to listen to, center, and amplify the voices and experiences of multiracial, multiethnic Indigenous community members beyond whiteness, especially the important voices and experiences...

Review by Ashley Caranto Morford


Exhibition, Film, and New Media Review

In/consequential Relationships: Refusing Colonial Ethics of Engagement in Yuxweluptun’s Inherent Rights, Vision Rights

On the closing day of the Museum of Anthropology’s Unceded Territories exhibit of Lawrence Paul Yuxweluptun’s art, crowds formed queues long enough to snake through the halls and to pack the exhibit space for the...

Review by Sarah King


Yuxweluptun Lawrence Paul

Exhibition, Film, and New Media Review

Reflexive Anthropology on Display: Franz Boas, George Hunt, and the Co-Production of Ethnographic Knowledge

  A portion of an 1897 letter from Franz Boas to Kwagu’ł Chiefs, reproduced in English and Kwak’wala, opens The Story Box: Franz Boas, George Hunt and the Making of Anthropology, an exhibition on view...

Review by Christopher T. Green


Kwakwaka'wakw U'mista Cultural Centre Boas Franz George Hunt

Exhibition, Film, and New Media Review

Altering the Landscape of Our Memories: A Review of Indigenous Cities (Vancouver)

I came to x̌ʷay̓x̌ʷəy̓ as a child, not knowing her name, but knowing she had the strength to hold out sharp city noises and the tenderness to hold onto the shy wood duck. To me,...

Review by Nicole Jung


Exhibition, Film, and New Media Review

Is the World Wonderful? On Judy Chartrand’s What a Wonderful World

Judy Chartrand: What a Wonderful World on view at the Bill Reid Gallery of Northwest Coast Art, Vancouver, BC, 19 October 2016 – 26 March 2017. Admittedly, I was confused about where the permanent collection...

Review by Allison Adler


art

Book Review

On the Cusp of Contact: Gender, Space and Race in the Colonization of British Columbia

No other historian has been able to capture the unique history and diversity of British Columbia as University of British Columbia professor emeritus Jean Barman, whose brilliant career is encapsulated in a select collection of...

Review by Chris Arnett


Exhibition, Film, and New Media Review

Sounds Japanese Canadian to Me

Sounds Japanese Canadian to Me is a monthly podcast on Japanese Canadian history and culture. Produced and hosted by Raymond Nakamura and staff of the Nikkei National Museum, the episodes are structured as a casual...

Review by Carin Holroyd


Exhibition, Film, and New Media Review

Konelīne: our land beautiful

As the language and culture director for the Tahltan Nation and a Tahltan academic, I believe giving voice to our people is crucial. Until recent times, the academy has privileged the voices of settlers and...

Review by Matthew Gartner


Exhibition, Film, and New Media Review

Now Is the Time

In the extraordinary short film Now Is the Time, Haida filmmaker Christopher Auchter brings to the screen a moving story of renewal through the restoration and re-editing of footage from the National Film Board of...

Review by Kristin L. Dowell


museums repatriation aboriginal self government colonialism settler colonialism aboriginal art aboriginal rights Haida Indigenous worlds

Exhibition, Film, and New Media Review

Crackdown

British Columbia is in year four of a provincial public health emergency declared in response to devastating rates of drug overdose deaths resulting from a toxic, illicit drug supply. As of July 2020, COVID-19 had...

Review by Kendra Milne


epidemics liquor and drugs mental health social services substance use government law public policy

Book Review

Cataloguing Culture: Legacies of Colonialism in Museum Documentation

As Hannah Turner points out in the introduction to her timely book, Cataloguing Culture: Legacies of Colonialism in Museum Documentation, “Museum records are often taken to be neutral or privileged sources of knowledge, but they...

Review by Joy Davis


Book Review

The Object’s the Thing: The Writings of Yorke Edwards, a Pioneer of Heritage Interpretation in Canada

When we visit a nature park or a museum, do we consider how interpretation contributed to our experience? For Yorke Edwards, “the father of nature interpretation in Canada,” interpreting the object is “the thing.” As...

Review by Patricia E. Roy


photo essay

Book Review

Paradise Won: The Struggle to Create Gwaii Haanas National Park Reserve

Knowing that Paradise Won: The Struggle to Create Gwaii Haanas National Park Reserve would end in the establishment of a park offers no relief from the sense of urgency that reading the book elicits. Usually,...

Review by Madison Heslop


Book Review

Deep and Sheltered Waters: The History of Tod Inlet

In Deep and Sheltered Waters: The History of Tod Inlet, David R. Gray – with a Foreword from his long-time friends and colleagues, Nancy J. Turner and Robert D. Turner – sets out to illuminate...

Review by Jacquelyn Miller


Book Review

Big Promises, Small Government: Doing Less with Less in the BC Liberal New Era

George Abbott was a cabinet minister for twelve years in the BC Liberal governments of Gordon Campbell and Christy Clark.  In Big Promises, Small Government, he reflects on his tenure in the first Campbell government...

Review by Stephen Phillips


Book Review

Kamloopa: An Indigenous Matriarch Story

The text of Kamloopa: An Indigenous Matriarch Story extends well beyond its own parameters, both literal and figurative. Syilx, Tsilhqot’in, Ktunaxa, and Dakelh playwright Kim Senklip Harvey offers a thoughtful, funny, and compelling exploration of...

Review by Theresa Warburton


Book Review

Inalienable Properties: The Political Economy of Indigenous Land Reform

In Inalienable Properties: the political economy of Indigenous land reform (2020), Jamie Baxter presents his readers with a puzzle surrounding the inalienability of Indigenous land tenure systems. Baxter asks, ‘why does inalienable property persist in...

Review by Jonathan Boron


Book Review

Unmooring The Komagata Maru: Charting Colonial Trajectories

From food (Valenze, 2012) to crops (Ali 2020, Rappaport 2019) to commodities (Curry-Machado, 2013) to digital cultures (Punathambekar and Mohan, 2019) and to empires (Bayly, 2003; Hopkins, 2003) there has been a steady scholarly commitment to...

Review by Dharitri Bhattacharjee


Book Review

He Speaks Volumes: A Biography of George Bowering

The Canadian writers who rose (or leapt) to prominence in the 1960s and 1970s, and who are sometimes thought to be synonymous with Canadian literature itself, are now venerable. Although Margaret Atwood remains a formidable...

Review by Nicholas Bradley