We acknowledge that we live and work on unceded Indigenous territories and we thank the Musqueam, Squamish and Tsleil-Waututh Nations for their hospitality.

Index

Results (90)

Exhibition, Film, and New Media Review

Is the World Wonderful? On Judy Chartrand’s What a Wonderful World

Judy Chartrand: What a Wonderful World on view at the Bill Reid Gallery of Northwest Coast Art, Vancouver, BC, 19 October 2016 – 26 March 2017. Admittedly, I was confused about where the permanent collection...

Review by Allison Adler


art

Book Review

Civilian Internment in Canada: Histories and Legacies

“There is no single historiography of internment” in Canada, write Rhonda L. Hinter and Jim Mochoruk in the introduction of this ambitious collection of essays (9-10). Siloed histories of particular internments, they suggest, convey episodic...

Review by Jordan Stranger-Ross


Exhibition, Film, and New Media Review

Reflexive Anthropology on Display: Franz Boas, George Hunt, and the Co-Production of Ethnographic Knowledge

  A portion of an 1897 letter from Franz Boas to Kwagu’ł Chiefs, reproduced in English and Kwak’wala, opens The Story Box: Franz Boas, George Hunt and the Making of Anthropology, an exhibition on view...

Review by Christopher T. Green


Kwakwaka'wakw U'mista Cultural Centre Boas Franz George Hunt

Book Review

Spirits of the Coast: Orcas in Science, Art and History

As I write, the world has received news that Talequah (or J35), the Southern Resident killer whale who carried her dead newborn for two weeks in 2018, is pregnant again. Spirits of the Coast: Orcas...

Review by Meghan Walley


Book Review

This Was Our Valley

The 2019 edition of This Was Our Valley by Shirlee Smith Matheson and Earl K. Pollon continues a longstanding conversation about the impacts of large dams in northern British Columbia. This story, told in three acts,...

Review by Douglas Robb


Book Review

Moved by the State: Forced Relocation and Making a Good Life in Postwar Canada

Focusing on the “trente glorieuses” period, Tina Loo’s study of how the Canadian welfare-state pursued its promise of universality gives us an in-depth look at five communities: namely Inuit villages in the district of Keewatin...

Review by Caroline Desbiens


Book Review

By Law or In Justice

The foundation of Professor Jane Dickson’s book, By Law Or in Justice, is her work as a Commissioner for the Indian Specific Claims Commission, from 2002 to 2009. The Commission itself endured from 1991 to...

Review by David Milward


Book Review

A Mill Behind Every Stump

This modest book aims to preserve the vanishing world of the Cariboo homesteader.  It recounts a life of geographic isolation, in Secwépemc traditional territory, that bred both freedom and self-reliance. Life in this context also cultivated...

Review by David Brownstein


Book Review

Sustenance: Writers from BC and Beyond on the Subject of Food 

With its over 250 prose and poetry narratives, biographies, and recipes, Rachel Rose has edited a timeless anthology,  Sustenance: Writers from BC and Beyond on the Subject of Food. Rose, named Vancouver’s poet laureate in 2014,...

Review by Gigi Berardi


Book Review

The Peace in Peril: The Real Cost of the Site C Dam

Anything written about the Site C dam in the past year or two was bound to become dated rapidly, given the pace of events, the uncertainty around the future of the project after the 2017...

Review by Matthew Evenden


Book Review

Maximum Canada: Why 35 Million Canadians Are Not Enough

Anyone with even the most superficial knowledge of eugenics, racism, the ‘domestication’ of women, and the history of the 20th century will know why pronatalism might ring the wrong bells. And this is setting aside...

Review by John Douglas Belshaw


Book Review

Art Inspired by the Canadian Rockies, Purcell Mountains and Selkirk Mountains, 1809-2012

  As Nancy Townshend writes in the preface of Art Inspired by the Canadian Rockies, Purcell Mountains and Selkirk Mountains, 1809-2012: “At one time, the Canadian Rockies, Purcell Mountains, and Selkirk Mountains existed as a...

Review by Maria Tippett


Book Review

Solitudes of the Workplace: Women in Universities

The essays in Solitudes of the Workplace examine the university as a workplace. The authors use the concept of solitude to examine women’s various experiences as workers in universities. A key premise of the book...

Review by Nancy Janovicek


Book Review

One More Time! The Dal Richards Story

  Local icon Dal Richards passed away on New Year’s Eve 2015. In the tributes that followed and at his memorial, many noted the auspiciousness of his passing. For years, his New Year’s Eve concerts...

Review by Vanessa Colantonio


Book Review

Gently to Nagasaki

Joy Kogawa’s place in literary history has been secure since 1981, when Obasan swayed more hearts and minds than art can generally hope to do. Told from the point of view of a six-year-old girl,...

Review by Susan Knutson


Book Review

Bringing Water to Victoria: An Illustrated History, 1843-1915

Little is as intimate and political as the water that flows from city taps. We fill our bodies with it, we wash our babies in it. Many of us depend on the state to provide...

Review by Adele Perry


Book Review

Listening for the Heartbeat of Being: The Arts of Robert Bringhurst

Poet Robert Bringhurst has been just on the periphery of my attention for many years, and it seems I’ve been in good company. Although he has made a name for himself in some circles (he...

Review by Ceilidh Hart


Book Review

The Final Report of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada. Volume One: Summary “Honouring the Truth, Reconciling the Future.”

The work of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC) between 2009 and 2015 is especially relevant to British Columbia. Residential schools and their impact are interwoven with the history, contemporary situation, and future development of...

Review by J.R. Miller


Book Review

Keeping Promises: The Royal Proclamation of 1763, Aboriginal Rights, and Treaties in Canada

In their introduction to Keeping Promises, the editors express the hope that its essays are “easy to read and accessible to the public” (6). As someone who has been keenly interested in these issues for...

Review by Hamar Foster