We acknowledge that we live and work on unceded Indigenous territories and we thank the Musqueam, Squamish and Tsleil-Waututh Nations for their hospitality.

Index

Results (905)

Book Review

On the Cusp of Contact: Gender, Space and Race in the Colonization of British Columbia

No other historian has been able to capture the unique history and diversity of British Columbia as University of British Columbia professor emeritus Jean Barman, whose brilliant career is encapsulated in a select collection of...

Review by Chris Arnett


Exhibition, Film, and New Media Review

Pop Culture Confronts British Columbia’s Colonial History

Grand Theft Terra Firma: A Game of Imperial Stickup, Abbotsford, British Columbia, the Reach Gallery Museum, 17 January – 7 May 2017. The exhibition is augmented by several public events, including a live theatrical performance...

Review by Erika Balcombe


Exhibition, Film, and New Media Review

Celebrating the Indigenous-Filipino Community on Bainbridge Island and the Indigenous Women Who Brought it into Being: A Review of Honor Thy Mother

The field of Indigenous studies is being called on with urgency to listen to, center, and amplify the voices and experiences of multiracial, multiethnic Indigenous community members beyond whiteness, especially the important voices and experiences...

Review by Ashley Caranto Morford


Exhibition, Film, and New Media Review

Altering the Landscape of Our Memories: A Review of Indigenous Cities (Vancouver)

I came to x̌ʷay̓x̌ʷəy̓ as a child, not knowing her name, but knowing she had the strength to hold out sharp city noises and the tenderness to hold onto the shy wood duck. To me,...

Review by Nicole Jung


review essay

Four Voices from British Columbia

Review by Dorothy Mindenhall


Exhibition, Film, and New Media Review

Sq’éwlets: A Stó:lo-Coast Salish Community in the Fraser River Valley Virtual Museum

Sq’éwlets: A Stó:lō -Coast Salish Community in the Fraser River Valley (Stó:lō Research and Resource Management Centre and Stó:lō Nation, 2016) is a virtual museum in the form of a website that reflects a collaborative...

Review by Dara Kelly


Sto:lo

Exhibition, Film, and New Media Review

RAVEN (De)Briefs Podcast: Indigenous Law in Action

Season one of the RAVEN (De)Briefs podcast series is a refreshing Indigenization of the traditional podcast format in that it evokes everyday kitchen table conversations among relatives, combined with sonic, Indigenous documentary. Exploring contemporary environmental...

Review by Lydia Toorenburgh


colonialism Delgamuukw v. BC Indigenous Indigenous rights treaties land claims law

Exhibition, Film, and New Media Review

When the City Sleeps, We Dream of Disruption: A Review of Lisa Jackson’s Transmissions Exhibition

Lisa Jackson’s exhibition entitled Transmissions premiered at the Simon Fraser University’s Vancouver campus from 6–28 September 2019. This new body of work weaves interdisciplinary themes regarding society, nature, Indigenous languages, and ecological futures. Lisa Jackson is Anishinaabe from the Aamjiwnaang First Nation and...

Review by Karlene Harvey


Aboriginal languages environment urbanization

Book Review

Fishes of the Salish Sea

Having studied fish for more than 40 years, I have accumulated more than 50 “fishes of…” books, latitudinally arranged on my office shelf, and none of them can compare in the quality, quantity, and aesthetics...

Review by Leo Bodensteiner


Exhibition, Film, and New Media Review

Sounds Japanese Canadian to Me

Sounds Japanese Canadian to Me is a monthly podcast on Japanese Canadian history and culture. Produced and hosted by Raymond Nakamura and staff of the Nikkei National Museum, the episodes are structured as a casual...

Review by Carin Holroyd


Exhibition, Film, and New Media Review

The Nameless Collective Podcast: Exploring History

Season one of the Nameless Collective, which is produced by Manjot Bains of JugniStyle and hosted by intrepid researchers, historians and archival explorers Naveen Girn, Milan Singh and Paneet Singh, evokes past South Asian Canadian...

Review by Satwinder Kaur Bains


Book Review

Landscapes of Injustice: A New Perspective on the Internment and Dispossession of Japanese Canadians

In historical memory, the forced confinement and exclusion of 22,000 Japanese Canadians from 1942 to 1949 remains one of the darkest and, unfortunately, least understood chapters in Canadian history. Although the story has been told...

Review by Jonathan van Harmelen