We acknowledge that we live and work on unceded Indigenous territories and we thank the Musqueam, Squamish and Tsleil-Waututh Nations for their hospitality.

Index

Results (68)

Exhibition, Film, and New Media Review

Reflexive Anthropology on Display: Franz Boas, George Hunt, and the Co-Production of Ethnographic Knowledge

  A portion of an 1897 letter from Franz Boas to Kwagu’ł Chiefs, reproduced in English and Kwak’wala, opens The Story Box: Franz Boas, George Hunt and the Making of Anthropology, an exhibition on view...

Review by Christopher T. Green


Kwakwaka'wakw U'mista Cultural Centre Boas Franz George Hunt

Book Review

Before and After the State: Politics, Poetics, and People(s) in the Pacific Northwest

The authors of Before and After the State: Politics, Poetics, and People(s) in the Pacific Northwest attempt to expand our understanding of the development of two nations, and a border between them, from a mostly political story...

Review by Brandon Dimmel


Book Review

Raven Walks Around the World

In Raven Walks Around the World, Henley shares parts of his personal journey of activism, travel, and life long work with Indigenous peoples around the world. Through his stories, Henley illuminates the determination of all...

Review by Maggie Low


Book Review

The Promise of Paradise: Utopian Communities in British Columbia

My childhood vacations did not involve the sophisticated technology that keeps my children (relatively) quiet in the backseat today. Apart from what I recall to be my endless patience on those long and winding drives...

Review by Darcy Ingram


Book Review

A Matter of Confidence: The Inside Story of the Political Battle for BC

In February of 2011, I was the moderator for the BC Liberal Leadership candidates’ debate in Prince George, British Columbia. As the evening got underway I saw Christy Clark enter the room. She caught my...

Review by Tracy Summerville


article

Regional patterns of substance use in the homeless in British Columbia

By Isabelle Aube Linden, Gregory R Werker, Christian G Schutz, Marissa Y Mar, Michael Krausz, Kerry Jang


homelessness liquor and drugs substance use Prince George Vancouver Victoria

Book Review

Mapping my Way Home: A Gitxsan History

British Columbians may be familiar with the landmark Delgamuukw case (Supreme Ct. of Canada, 1997), which established that testimony on based upon traditional knowledge and oral history is valid evidence. But most are limited in...

Review by Jillian Ridington


Book Review

People of the Saltwater: An Ethnography of the Gitlax m’oon.

 “Gitlax m’oon, people of the saltwater” are more commonly known as the Gitxaala; their principal village, Lach Klan is located on what is now called Dolphin Island, a little to the south of Prince Rupert....

Review by Robert M. Galois


Book Review

Tax, Order, and Good Government: A New Political History of Canada, 1867-1917.

E.A Heaman has produced a decided masterpiece on a topic too often thought to be dry as a bone. Taxation, with its underlying legitimacy of consent, is the lifeblood of the state, supplying it with...

Review by Michael J. Prince


Book Review

The Queen of the North Disaster, The Captain’s Story

As one might expect from a competent and conscientious career mariner, Colin Henthorne’s account of the sinking of the Queen of the North on March 22, 2006, a little south of Prince Rupert on British...

Review by Howard Stewart


Book Review

Unbuilt Environments: Tracing Postwar Development in Northwest British Columbia

In 1921 the Prince George Citizen reminded its readership that “central B.C. is not a new country” (Prince George Citizen 1921). Defining “central B.C.” as those parts of the province situated between the 52nd and...

Review by Daniel Sims


Book Review

Maximum Canada: Why 35 Million Canadians Are Not Enough

Anyone with even the most superficial knowledge of eugenics, racism, the ‘domestication’ of women, and the history of the 20th century will know why pronatalism might ring the wrong bells. And this is setting aside...

Review by John Douglas Belshaw


Book Review

Through an Unknown Country: The Jarvis-Hanington Winter Expedition through the Northern Rockies, 1874-1875

This miscellany of writings, chiefly by two civil engineers who for parts of their careers  toiled as railway surveyors, aims to carve out a prominent place for them in the history of Canada. Ed Jarvis...

Review by I.S. MacLaren


Book Review

What We Learned: Two Generations Reflect on Tsimshian Education and the Day Schools.

The impetus for What We Learned, a collaborative book written by Helen Raptis and twelve members of the Tsimshian Nation, was Raptis’s archival discovery of a 1947 class list from the Port Essington Indian Day...

Review by Sean Carleton


Book Review

Sister Soldiers of the Great War: The Nurses of the Canadian Army Medical Corps

During the First World War, 2,845 women enlisted as lieutenant nursing sisters in the Canadian Army Medical Corps (CAMC) (39), but over the ensuing century their experiences of service have largely gone untold. They comprised...

Review by Sarah Glassford


Book Review

Canadian Counterculture and the Environment

Contemporary environmental debate owes a lot to the counterculture movements of the 1960s, 1970s, and 1980s. This is one of the main contentions of Canadian Countercultures and the Environment, the fourth book published under the...

Review by James Rhatigan


Book Review

Maritime Command Pacific: The Royal Canadian Navy’s West Coast Fleet in the Early Cold War

This welcome new study concerns the operations of Canada’s west coast fleet in the two decades after the Second World War. Soon after 1945, defence policy came to be dominated by Canada’s contributions to NATO...

Review by Jan Drent


Book Review

Transforming Provincial Politics: The Political Economy of Canada’s Provinces and Territories in the Neoliberal Era

Provincial specialists can have crowded bookshelves. Because good material is dispersed and rare, many things grace my shelves “just in case.” But this anthology arrives just in time — and I will work it hard...

Review by Jamie Lawson