We acknowledge that we live and work on unceded Indigenous territories and we thank the Musqueam, Squamish and Tsleil-Waututh Nations for their hospitality.

Index

Results (396)

Book Review

The Story of Radio Mind: A Missionary’s Journey on Indigenous Land

Many British Columbians today want to learn more about the history and ongoing legacy of settler colonialism. The news of unmarked graves being located at former residential school sites across Canada has prompted people to...

Review by Sean Carleton


Exhibition, Film, and New Media Review

When the City Sleeps, We Dream of Disruption: A Review of Lisa Jackson’s Transmissions Exhibition

Lisa Jackson’s exhibition entitled Transmissions premiered at the Simon Fraser University’s Vancouver campus from 6–28 September 2019. This new body of work weaves interdisciplinary themes regarding society, nature, Indigenous languages, and ecological futures. Lisa Jackson is Anishinaabe from the Aamjiwnaang First Nation and...

Review by Karlene Harvey


Aboriginal languages environment urbanization

Exhibition, Film, and New Media Review

The Body Remembers When the World Broke Open 

Though many will recognize Elle-Máijá Tailfeathers for her remarkable body of short and documentary films (Bloodland [2011], A Red Girl’s Reasoning [2012], Bihttoš [2014], cəsnaʔəm, the city before the city [2017]), The Body Remembers When the World Broke Open (2019)...

Review by Karrmen Crey


Exhibition, Film, and New Media Review

Screen Sovereignty: Indigenous Matriarch 4 Articulating the Future of Indigenous VR

 Indigenous matriarchs are changing the culture of the technology industry through virtual reality (VR). Indigenous Matriarch 4 (IM4) is the first Indigenous virtual reality media lab and is situated on the West Coast. Currently, it...

Review by Courteney Morin


new media technology virtual reality aboriginal art

Exhibition, Film, and New Media Review

Is the World Wonderful? On Judy Chartrand’s What a Wonderful World

Judy Chartrand: What a Wonderful World on view at the Bill Reid Gallery of Northwest Coast Art, Vancouver, BC, 19 October 2016 – 26 March 2017. Admittedly, I was confused about where the permanent collection...

Review by Allison Adler


art

Exhibition, Film, and New Media Review

Pop Culture Confronts British Columbia’s Colonial History

Grand Theft Terra Firma: A Game of Imperial Stickup, Abbotsford, British Columbia, the Reach Gallery Museum, 17 January – 7 May 2017. The exhibition is augmented by several public events, including a live theatrical performance...

Review by Erika Balcombe


Exhibition, Film, and New Media Review

Now Is the Time

In the extraordinary short film Now Is the Time, Haida filmmaker Christopher Auchter brings to the screen a moving story of renewal through the restoration and re-editing of footage from the National Film Board of...

Review by Kristin L. Dowell


museums repatriation aboriginal self government colonialism settler colonialism aboriginal art aboriginal rights Haida Indigenous worlds

Exhibition, Film, and New Media Review

RAVEN (De)Briefs Podcast: Indigenous Law in Action

Season one of the RAVEN (De)Briefs podcast series is a refreshing Indigenization of the traditional podcast format in that it evokes everyday kitchen table conversations among relatives, combined with sonic, Indigenous documentary. Exploring contemporary environmental...

Review by Lydia Toorenburgh


colonialism Delgamuukw v. BC Indigenous Indigenous rights treaties land claims law

Book Review

Landscapes of Injustice: A New Perspective on the Internment and Dispossession of Japanese Canadians

In historical memory, the forced confinement and exclusion of 22,000 Japanese Canadians from 1942 to 1949 remains one of the darkest and, unfortunately, least understood chapters in Canadian history. Although the story has been told...

Review by Jonathan van Harmelen


Exhibition, Film, and New Media Review

Altering the Landscape of Our Memories: A Review of Indigenous Cities (Vancouver)

I came to x̌ʷay̓x̌ʷəy̓ as a child, not knowing her name, but knowing she had the strength to hold out sharp city noises and the tenderness to hold onto the shy wood duck. To me,...

Review by Nicole Jung


Book Review

On the Cusp of Contact: Gender, Space and Race in the Colonization of British Columbia

No other historian has been able to capture the unique history and diversity of British Columbia as University of British Columbia professor emeritus Jean Barman, whose brilliant career is encapsulated in a select collection of...

Review by Chris Arnett


Exhibition, Film, and New Media Review

Sq’éwlets: A Stó:lo-Coast Salish Community in the Fraser River Valley Virtual Museum

Sq’éwlets: A Stó:lō -Coast Salish Community in the Fraser River Valley (Stó:lō Research and Resource Management Centre and Stó:lō Nation, 2016) is a virtual museum in the form of a website that reflects a collaborative...

Review by Dara Kelly


Sto:lo

Book Review

The Wagon Road: The Saga of the Cariboo Gold Rush, Revised and Expanded Edition

As Ken Mather reminds us in the preface to this revised and expanded edition of Wagon Road North, it is for a good reason that Art Down’s book has remained probably the single most popular...

Review by Chris Herbert


Book Review

Decolonizing Discipline: Children, Corporal Punishment, Christian Theologies, and Reconciliation

Decolonizing Discipline is a direct response to the sixth call of action made by the Truth and Reconciliation Commission to repeal Section 43 of Canada’s criminal code, which allows corporal punishment “to correct what is...

Review by Alex Gagne


Book Review

Victoria Unbuttoned: A Red-Light History of BC’s Capital City

Linda J. Eversole’s first book, Stella: Unrepentant Madam, written in 2005, was praised for its academic value and readability. The author continues her exploration of women in the sex trade with Victoria Unbuttoned, profiling ten...

Review by Janet Nicol


Book Review

Against the Current and Into the Light: Performing History and Land in Coast Salish Territories and Vancouver’s Stanley Park

Coast Salish Indigenous people never ceded their lands and resources to settlers and have always asserted their sovereignty. Over time, those assertions have taken various forms: petitions, protests, litigation. There have also been cultural assertions...

Review by Sean Kheraj


Book Review

Creating Indigenous Property: Power, Rights, and Relationships

Is it possible for two entirely different legal frameworks, built by ontologically diverse and frequently disparate parties, to coexist under one judicial system? This question would be difficult enough when considering two parties on equal...

Review by Christopher Martin


Book Review

Go Do Some Great Thing: The Black Pioneers of British Columbia

The revised third edition of Kilian Crawford’s ground-breaking book on BC’s Black pioneers is timely and essential reading. It is a critical corrective to omissions and erasure in both academic histories and in popular understandings,...

Review by Georgia Sitara


this space here

The Legacy and Future of the Buffalo People

By Buffalo Star Woman (Sandra Delorme)


Book Review

A Bounded Land: Reflections on Settler Colonialism in Canada

Historical geographer Cole Harris, professor emeritus at UBC, has in his latest book brought together a number of his articles, some previously published, to focus on the subject of settler colonialism in Canada. It is...

Review by Kenneth Favrholdt


Book Review

Civilian Internment in Canada: Histories and Legacies

“There is no single historiography of internment” in Canada, write Rhonda L. Hinter and Jim Mochoruk in the introduction of this ambitious collection of essays (9-10). Siloed histories of particular internments, they suggest, convey episodic...

Review by Jordan Stanger-Ross