We acknowledge that we live and work on unceded Indigenous territories and we thank the Musqueam, Squamish and Tsleil-Waututh Nations for their hospitality.

Index

Results (301)

Exhibition, Film, and New Media Review

Monkey Beach

Cree and Métis director Loretta Todd’s Monkey Beach is a long-awaited adaptation of Haisla and Heitsulk writer Eden Robinson’s classic novel of the same name. And, in many ways, the film doesn’t disappoint. In Todd’s...

Review by Theresa Warburton


Book Review

The Story of Radio Mind: A Missionary’s Journey on Indigenous Land

Many British Columbians today want to learn more about the history and ongoing legacy of settler colonialism. The news of unmarked graves being located at former residential school sites across Canada has prompted people to...

Review by Sean Carleton


Exhibition, Film, and New Media Review

Celebrating the Indigenous-Filipino Community on Bainbridge Island and the Indigenous Women Who Brought it into Being: A Review of Honor Thy Mother

The field of Indigenous studies is being called on with urgency to listen to, center, and amplify the voices and experiences of multiracial, multiethnic Indigenous community members beyond whiteness, especially the important voices and experiences...

Review by Ashley Caranto Morford


Exhibition, Film, and New Media Review

Altering the Landscape of Our Memories: A Review of Indigenous Cities (Vancouver)

I came to x̌ʷay̓x̌ʷəy̓ as a child, not knowing her name, but knowing she had the strength to hold out sharp city noises and the tenderness to hold onto the shy wood duck. To me,...

Review by Nicole Jung


Book Review

The Theatre of Regret: Literature, Art, and the Politics of Reconciliation in Canada

In The Theatre of Regret: Literature, Art and the Politics of Reconciliation in Canada, David Gaertner, an academic author and settler-scholar, centres Indigenous literary and artistic works to contribute to critiques of reconciliation. The book is a...

Review by Christine Añonuevo


Exhibition, Film, and New Media Review

The Transect Podcast Review

The world of British Columbian archaeology is, to most, unknown and inaccessible. This is a shame, particularly in a province whose settler population has such a poor grasp of its long human history. Archaeology is...

Review by Eric Simons


Book Review

Against the Current and Into the Light: Performing History and Land in Coast Salish Territories and Vancouver’s Stanley Park

Coast Salish Indigenous people never ceded their lands and resources to settlers and have always asserted their sovereignty. Over time, those assertions have taken various forms: petitions, protests, litigation. There have also been cultural assertions...

Review by Sean Kheraj


Book Review

Searching for Pitt Lake Gold: Facts and Fantasy in the Legend of Slumach

Searching for Pitt Lake Gold: Facts and Fantasy in the Legend of Slumach, from local historian Fred Braches, deconstructs the myth of Slumach’s lost gold mine. Perpetuated by a handful of “creative” journalists and seized...

Review by Alice Gorton


photo essay

Book Review

The Object’s the Thing: The Writings of Yorke Edwards, a Pioneer of Heritage Interpretation in Canada

When we visit a nature park or a museum, do we consider how interpretation contributed to our experience? For Yorke Edwards, “the father of nature interpretation in Canada,” interpreting the object is “the thing.” As...

Review by Patricia E. Roy


Exhibition, Film, and New Media Review

Is the World Wonderful? On Judy Chartrand’s What a Wonderful World

Judy Chartrand: What a Wonderful World on view at the Bill Reid Gallery of Northwest Coast Art, Vancouver, BC, 19 October 2016 – 26 March 2017. Admittedly, I was confused about where the permanent collection...

Review by Allison Adler


art

Exhibition, Film, and New Media Review

A Tradition of Evolution: The Vancouver Indigenous Media Arts Festival

Vancouver Indigenous Media Arts Festival: Vancouver, British Columbia, 25-26 May 2017. The festival featured film and new media presentations, including a “Turtle Island Shorts” program (May 26); VR and augmented reality presentations (May 27); and...

Review by Carleigh Baker


aboriginal art

Exhibition, Film, and New Media Review

Pop Culture Confronts British Columbia’s Colonial History

Grand Theft Terra Firma: A Game of Imperial Stickup, Abbotsford, British Columbia, the Reach Gallery Museum, 17 January – 7 May 2017. The exhibition is augmented by several public events, including a live theatrical performance...

Review by Erika Balcombe


Exhibition, Film, and New Media Review

In/consequential Relationships: Refusing Colonial Ethics of Engagement in Yuxweluptun’s Inherent Rights, Vision Rights

On the closing day of the Museum of Anthropology’s Unceded Territories exhibit of Lawrence Paul Yuxweluptun’s art, crowds formed queues long enough to snake through the halls and to pack the exhibit space for the...

Review by Sarah King


Yuxweluptun Lawrence Paul

Book Review

Captain Cook Rediscovered: Voyaging to the Icy Latitudes

On 12 July 1776 Captain James Cook, Royal Navy, sailed from Plymouth, England, in the three-master collier, Resolution, in search of the fabled Northwest Passage. It was a voyage that swept Cook and the crews...

Review by Barry Gough


Book Review

A Bounded Land: Reflections on Settler Colonialism in Canada

Historical geographer Cole Harris, professor emeritus at UBC, has in his latest book brought together a number of his articles, some previously published, to focus on the subject of settler colonialism in Canada. It is...

Review by Kenneth Favrholdt


Exhibition, Film, and New Media Review

Konelīne: our land beautiful

As the language and culture director for the Tahltan Nation and a Tahltan academic, I believe giving voice to our people is crucial. Until recent times, the academy has privileged the voices of settlers and...

Review by Matthew Gartner


Book Review

Civilian Internment in Canada: Histories and Legacies

“There is no single historiography of internment” in Canada, write Rhonda L. Hinter and Jim Mochoruk in the introduction of this ambitious collection of essays (9-10). Siloed histories of particular internments, they suggest, convey episodic...

Review by Jordan Stanger-Ross


Book Review

In Nature’s Realm: Early Naturalists Explore Vancouver Island

In Nature’s Realm, a third tome from Michael Layland that focuses on the (mostly) colonial histories of Vancouver Island, is an artistic and literary achievement. Layland’s hybrid of chronological and thematic descriptions of Vancouver Island-related...

Review by Nicholas Stanger