We acknowledge that we live and work on unceded Indigenous territories and we thank the Musqueam, Squamish and Tsleil-Waututh Nations for their hospitality.

Index

Results (168)

Book Review

Captain Cook Rediscovered: Voyaging to the Icy Latitudes

On 12 July 1776 Captain James Cook, Royal Navy, sailed from Plymouth, England, in the three-master collier, Resolution, in search of the fabled Northwest Passage. It was a voyage that swept Cook and the crews...

Review by Barry Gough


Book Review

Entering Time: The Fungus Man Platters of Charles Edenshaw

In 2013 the Vancouver Art Gallery’s Charles Edenshaw exhibition brought together three argillite platters made in the late 1880s by Da.a. xiigang, Charles Edenshaw – one from the Field Museum in Chicago, one from the...

Review by Martha Black


Book Review

In Nature’s Realm: Early Naturalists Explore Vancouver Island

In Nature’s Realm, a third tome from Michael Layland that focuses on the (mostly) colonial histories of Vancouver Island, is an artistic and literary achievement. Layland’s hybrid of chronological and thematic descriptions of Vancouver Island-related...

Review by Nicholas Stanger


Book Review

Inalienable Properties: The Political Economy of Indigenous Land Reform

In Inalienable Properties: the political economy of Indigenous land reform (2020), Jamie Baxter presents his readers with a puzzle surrounding the inalienability of Indigenous land tenure systems. Baxter asks, ‘why does inalienable property persist in...

Review by Jonathan Boron


Book Review

Solemn Words and Foundational Documents: An Annotated Discussion of Indigenous-Crown Treaties in Canada, 1752-1923

When the Indian Residential Schools Truth and Reconciliation Commission released its final report in 2015 it drew attention to the importance of treaty making in the history of Crown-Indigenous relations in Canada. Treaty making, the...

Review by Carole Blackburn


Book Review

At the Bridge: James Teit and an Anthropology of Belonging

James Teit was an amazing community-based engaged anthropologist long before such labels were invented. Wendy Wickwire’s anthropological life story of Teit is a consummate account and indeed, as the top of page advertisement exhorts, it...

Review by Charles R. Menzies


Book Review

Time Travel: Tourism and the Rise of the Living History Museum in Mid-Twentieth-Century Canada

We all remember them. I know that I do. Having spent a summer in my youth washing dishes at Fort Steele heritage town, I remember the wooden boardwalks, the ramshackle buildings, the yellow school buses...

Review by Sean MacPherson


Book Review

Disappointment River: Finding and Losing the Northwest Passage

“You can get anywhere if you have the time” (106). Kylik Kisoun, an Inuvialuit guide from Inuvik, said this to Brian Castner when Castner, with the help of four friends, canoed the length of the...

Review by Stan Tag


Book Review

Secwépemc People, Land, and Laws: Yerí7 re Stsq’ey’s-kucw

Marianne and Ron Ignace are members of the Secwépemc First Nation in south-central British Columbia.  Ron was raised by his great-grandparents, grew up speaking Secwepemctsín, and is a former Chief.  Both Ron and Marianne have...

Review by Robin Ridington


Book Review

Arctic Ambitions: Captain Cook and the Northwest Passage

James Cook was the greatest navigator of his, and perhaps any, age. He did more than any other individual to make the Pacific, which covers one third of the earth’s surface, known to Europe. Through...

Review by Robin Fisher


Book Review

The Fur Trade Gamble: North West Company on the Pacific Slope, 1800-1820

This is not the first nor will be it the last scholarly or non-scholarly work on the North West Company’s ill-fated “Columbia adventure,” an enterprise in frustration for the investors and participants, both by land...

Review by Barry Gough


Book Review

Polarity, Patriotism and Dissent in Great War Canada, 1914-1919

Premised on his insight that “If there is an arithmetic to the management of dissent, there is also a mathematics” (6), Brock Millman’s study of the polarization of Canadian society into supporters and opponents of...

Review by James Wood


Book Review

The Royal Fjord: Memories of Jervis Inlet

In The Royal Fjord, Ray Phillips, a long-time resident of the Sunshine Coast, finishes a job his late father started. It is, says Phillips, a book of “many anecdotes [and other stories that] tell some...

Review by Howard Stewart


Book Review

Britannia’s Navy, On the West Coast of North America 1812 – 1914

This handsome volume, published in hardback with a blue and white dust-cover (featuring E. P. Bedwell’s 1862 painting of the steam-sloop HMS Plumper on the front and a photograph of HMCS Rainbow in Esquimalt, January...

Review by Alexander Howlett


Book Review

Death in the Peaceable Kingdom: Canadian History since 1867 Through Murder, Execution, Assassination and Suicide

Two decades ago, a prominent conservative academic smacked down Canadian university instructors with the provocatively-titled Who Killed Canadian History? J.L. Granatstein’s answer was, in part, social history and the historians who taught it. Social historian...

Review by Larry Hannant