We acknowledge that we live and work on unceded Indigenous territories and we thank the Musqueam, Squamish and Tsleil-Waututh Nations for their hospitality.

Index

Results (264)

Book Review

Sisters of the Ice: The True Story of How St. Roch and North Star of Herschel Island Protected Canadian Arctic Sovereignty

The polar north continues to have an enduring fascination for geopoliticians, tourists and mariners. Readers of history and other disciplines attracted to this subject abound. The navigation and search for a Northwest Passage is one...

Review by Barry Gough


Book Review

Landscapes of Injustice: A New Perspective on the Internment and Dispossession of Japanese Canadians

In historical memory, the forced confinement and exclusion of 22,000 Japanese Canadians from 1942 to 1949 remains one of the darkest and, unfortunately, least understood chapters in Canadian history. Although the story has been told...

Review by Jonathan van Harmelen


Exhibition, Film, and New Media Review

Sounds Japanese Canadian to Me

Sounds Japanese Canadian to Me is a monthly podcast on Japanese Canadian history and culture. Produced and hosted by Raymond Nakamura and staff of the Nikkei National Museum, the episodes are structured as a casual...

Review by Carin Holroyd


Exhibition, Film, and New Media Review

Not your usual science: a Future Ecologies Podcast Review

Future Ecologies is not your typical science podcast. Strongly reminiscent of Radiolab (2002–), the renowned WNYC series from the “golden age” of podcasting (Berry 2015), Future Ecologies investigates “the shape of our world,” or the...

Review by Milena Droumeva


Exhibition, Film, and New Media Review

Vancouver: No Fixed Address

What stays with you after watching Charles Wilkinson’s new documentary, Vancouver: No Fixed Address, is its beautiful cinematography. Vancouver’s ideal location at the intersection of the ocean, the mountains, and the sky is captured brilliantly: every shot...

Review by Patricia Wood


Exhibition, Film, and New Media Review

Konelīne: our land beautiful

As the language and culture director for the Tahltan Nation and a Tahltan academic, I believe giving voice to our people is crucial. Until recent times, the academy has privileged the voices of settlers and...

Review by Matthew Gartner


Exhibition, Film, and New Media Review

A Tradition of Evolution: The Vancouver Indigenous Media Arts Festival

Vancouver Indigenous Media Arts Festival: Vancouver, British Columbia, 25-26 May 2017. The festival featured film and new media presentations, including a “Turtle Island Shorts” program (May 26); VR and augmented reality presentations (May 27); and...

Review by Carleigh Baker


aboriginal art

Book Review

The Wagon Road: The Saga of the Cariboo Gold Rush, Revised and Expanded Edition

As Ken Mather reminds us in the preface to this revised and expanded edition of Wagon Road North, it is for a good reason that Art Down’s book has remained probably the single most popular...

Review by Chris Herbert


Book Review

Victoria Unbuttoned: A Red-Light History of BC’s Capital City

Linda J. Eversole’s first book, Stella: Unrepentant Madam, written in 2005, was praised for its academic value and readability. The author continues her exploration of women in the sex trade with Victoria Unbuttoned, profiling ten...

Review by Janet Nicol


photo essay

Book Review

Captain Cook Rediscovered: Voyaging to the Icy Latitudes

On 12 July 1776 Captain James Cook, Royal Navy, sailed from Plymouth, England, in the three-master collier, Resolution, in search of the fabled Northwest Passage. It was a voyage that swept Cook and the crews...

Review by Barry Gough


Book Review

Civilian Internment in Canada: Histories and Legacies

“There is no single historiography of internment” in Canada, write Rhonda L. Hinter and Jim Mochoruk in the introduction of this ambitious collection of essays (9-10). Siloed histories of particular internments, they suggest, convey episodic...

Review by Jordan Stanger-Ross


Book Review

Northwest Voices: Language and Culture in the Pacific Northwest

What, if anything, is the socio-linguistic glue that binds together the region often referred to as the Pacific Northwest? When it comes to language and culture, do the peoples of Washington and Oregon in the...

Review by Mark Turin


Book Review

At the Wilderness Edge: The Rise of the Antidevelopment Movement on Canada’s West Coast

In recent years, local opposition to the expansion of the Trans Mountain Pipeline in BC has confounded the plans of oil investors and federal officials alike. The government of Alberta has declared its right to...

Review by Jason M. Colby


Book Review

Surveying the 120th Meridian and the Great Divide: The Alberta-BC Boundary Survey, 1918-1924

In this, his ninth monograph on surveying in BC, Jay Sherwood returns with the second of two volumes on the work of the Alberta-BC Boundary Survey in the early twentieth century.  The first installment, Surveying...

Review by Jason Grek-Martin


Book Review

Voices from the Skeena: An Illustrated Oral History

Many familiar with Imbert Orchard’s CBC radio interviews from the 1960s will welcome this publication of transcriptions of oral interviews relating to the history of the Skeena River together with forty illustrations executed by the...

Review by Ted Binnema


Book Review

This Was Our Valley

The 2019 edition of This Was Our Valley by Shirlee Smith Matheson and Earl K. Pollon continues a longstanding conversation about the impacts of large dams in northern British Columbia. This story, told in three acts,...

Review by Douglas Robb


Book Review

Vancouverism

It’s best to start any study with a clear, concise, and irrefutable sentence. But “Vancouver is a place” is taking that axiom too far. And, as anyone who knows horses will tell you, a place...

Review by John Douglas Belshaw


Book Review

Captive Audience: How Corporations Invaded our Schools

Corporate involvement in Canadian schools is an emotional topic. There are alarmists, like some of the teachers’ federations. They long for public education’s halcyon days and warn vaguely of nefarious “neoliberals” set to “privatize.” There...

Review by Jason Ellis


Book Review

Children of the Kootenays: Memories of Mining Towns

Shirley D. Stainton’s Children of the Kootenays: Memories of Mining Towns describes her own and her brother Ray’s childhoods in West Kootenay mining communities during the 1930s and 1940s. Stainton’s father, Lee Hall, was a cook...

Review by Duff Sutherland


Book Review

Dreamers and Designers: The Shaping of West Vancouver

Between 2011 and 2016, the population of the District of West Vancouver declined by one half of one percent. In contrast, the population of Metro Vancouver grew 6.5%; even the comparably wealthy West Point Grey...

Review by Peter Hall