We acknowledge that we live and work on unceded Indigenous territories and we thank the Musqueam, Squamish and Tsleil-Waututh Nations for their hospitality.

Index

Results (387)

Book Review

Rivers Run Through Us: A Natural and Human History of Great Rivers of North America

Eric B. Taylor’s Rivers Run Through Us: A Natural and Human History of Great Rivers of North America is a synthetic survey of ten waterways. In these fluid vignettes, the author covers the foundational importance...

Review by Daniel Macfarlane


Book Review

Able to Lead: Disablement, Radicalism, and the Political Life of E.T. Kingsley

Eugene Thornton Kingsley, an influential socialist in early British Columbia, was 33 years old when he adopted his revolutionary stance.  Employed as a brakeman on a railway in rural Montana in 1890, he fell between...

Review by Janet Nicol


Book Review

Step Into Wilderness: A Pictorial History of Outdoor Exploration in and Around the Comox Valley

Drawing primarily on a photographic collection held by the Courtenay and District Museum, Step into Wilderness considers “the theme of people living in the natural world and exploring both the opportunities it provides and the...

Review by Sarah Jacobs


Book Review

Sisters of the Ice: The True Story of How St. Roch and North Star of Herschel Island Protected Canadian Arctic Sovereignty

The polar north continues to have an enduring fascination for geopoliticians, tourists and mariners. Readers of history and other disciplines attracted to this subject abound. The navigation and search for a Northwest Passage is one...

Review by Barry Gough


Book Review

The Theatre of Regret: Literature, Art, and the Politics of Reconciliation in Canada

In The Theatre of Regret: Literature, Art and the Politics of Reconciliation in Canada, David Gaertner, an academic author and settler-scholar, centres Indigenous literary and artistic works to contribute to critiques of reconciliation. The book is a...

Review by Christine Añonuevo


Exhibition, Film, and New Media Review

RAVEN (De)Briefs Podcast: Indigenous Law in Action

Season one of the RAVEN (De)Briefs podcast series is a refreshing Indigenization of the traditional podcast format in that it evokes everyday kitchen table conversations among relatives, combined with sonic, Indigenous documentary. Exploring contemporary environmental...

Review by Lydia Toorenburgh


colonialism Delgamuukw v. BC Indigenous Indigenous rights treaties land claims law

Exhibition, Film, and New Media Review

When the City Sleeps, We Dream of Disruption: A Review of Lisa Jackson’s Transmissions Exhibition

Lisa Jackson’s exhibition entitled Transmissions premiered at the Simon Fraser University’s Vancouver campus from 6–28 September 2019. This new body of work weaves interdisciplinary themes regarding society, nature, Indigenous languages, and ecological futures. Lisa Jackson is Anishinaabe from the Aamjiwnaang First Nation and...

Review by Karlene Harvey


Aboriginal languages environment urbanization

Exhibition, Film, and New Media Review

Reflexive Anthropology on Display: Franz Boas, George Hunt, and the Co-Production of Ethnographic Knowledge

  A portion of an 1897 letter from Franz Boas to Kwagu’ł Chiefs, reproduced in English and Kwak’wala, opens The Story Box: Franz Boas, George Hunt and the Making of Anthropology, an exhibition on view...

Review by Christopher T. Green


Kwakwaka'wakw U'mista Cultural Centre Boas Franz George Hunt

Exhibition, Film, and New Media Review

A Tradition of Evolution: The Vancouver Indigenous Media Arts Festival

Vancouver Indigenous Media Arts Festival: Vancouver, British Columbia, 25-26 May 2017. The festival featured film and new media presentations, including a “Turtle Island Shorts” program (May 26); VR and augmented reality presentations (May 27); and...

Review by Carleigh Baker


aboriginal art

Book Review

Go Do Some Great Thing: The Black Pioneers of British Columbia

The revised third edition of Kilian Crawford’s ground-breaking book on BC’s Black pioneers is timely and essential reading. It is a critical corrective to omissions and erasure in both academic histories and in popular understandings,...

Review by Georgia Sitara


Book Review

Civilian Internment in Canada: Histories and Legacies

“There is no single historiography of internment” in Canada, write Rhonda L. Hinter and Jim Mochoruk in the introduction of this ambitious collection of essays (9-10). Siloed histories of particular internments, they suggest, convey episodic...

Review by Jordan Stanger-Ross


Exhibition, Film, and New Media Review

Uninterrupted

Editorial note: Uninterrupted is reviewed here following its role as inspiration for a nightly ‘cinematic spectacle’ on Vancouver’s Cambie Street Bridge during the summer of 2017 (see uninterrupted.ca). Uninterrupted, a film about a very special...

Review by Nick Stanger


Book Review

Unmooring The Komagata Maru: Charting Colonial Trajectories

From food (Valenze, 2012) to crops (Ali 2020, Rappaport 2019) to commodities (Curry-Machado, 2013) to digital cultures (Punathambekar and Mohan, 2019) and to empires (Bayly, 2003; Hopkins, 2003) there has been a steady scholarly commitment to...

Review by Dharitri Bhattacharjee


Book Review

Entering Time: The Fungus Man Platters of Charles Edenshaw

In 2013 the Vancouver Art Gallery’s Charles Edenshaw exhibition brought together three argillite platters made in the late 1880s by Da.a. xiigang, Charles Edenshaw – one from the Field Museum in Chicago, one from the...

Review by Martha Black


Book Review

In Nature’s Realm: Early Naturalists Explore Vancouver Island

In Nature’s Realm, a third tome from Michael Layland that focuses on the (mostly) colonial histories of Vancouver Island, is an artistic and literary achievement. Layland’s hybrid of chronological and thematic descriptions of Vancouver Island-related...

Review by Nicholas Stanger


Book Review

Rain City: Vancouver Reflections

John Moore is a BC-based free-lance journalist and author. Original versions of the sixteen essays that make up this volume have appeared in a variety of newspapers and periodicals over several decades. Some have won...

Review by John Belec


Book Review

Stagecoach North: A History of Barnard’s Express

In Stagecoach North, Ken Mather undercovers the history of one of the most important companies in British Columbia:  Barnard’s Express. From 1862 to 1914 this famed company carried passengers, freight, and mail along the Cariboo...

Review by Christopher Herbert


Book Review

Waterlogged: Examples and Procedures for Northwest Coast Archaeologists

Waterlogged will find its way to the bookshelves of almost every practicing archaeologist in BC. It succeeds in bringing together experience and innovation in a single source. A mix of advice for field archaeologists, empirical research...

Review by Paul A. Ewonus, PhD, RPCA


Book Review

“Opposition on the Coast”: The Hudson’s Bay Company, American Coasters, the Russian American Company, and Native Traders on the Northwest Coast, 1825-1846

Jim Gibson has assembled a collection of primary sources: 27 documents from Hudson’s Bay Company (HBC) archives, British Columbia provincial archives, and microfilm of Russian-American Company (RAC) records from the US National Archives. A significant...

Review by Howard Stewart


Book Review

When Days Are Long: Nurse in the North

In this book, first published upon her retirement in 1965, Amy Wilson presents a biographical history of her career as a public health nurse in Northern British Columbia and the Yukon during the 1950s and...

Review by Geertje Boschma


Book Review

Surveying the 120th Meridian and the Great Divide: The Alberta-BC Boundary Survey, 1918-1924

In this, his ninth monograph on surveying in BC, Jay Sherwood returns with the second of two volumes on the work of the Alberta-BC Boundary Survey in the early twentieth century.  The first installment, Surveying...

Review by Jason Grek-Martin


Book Review

The Co-op Revolution: Vancouver’s Search for Food

When growers, producers and practitioners self-organize around shared interests in the local foods economy, their social and economic actions—whether through a farmer’s market, buying co-op or the production of local food—can feel tenuous on the...

Review by Diandra Oliver