We acknowledge that we live and work on unceded Indigenous territories and we thank the Musqueam, Squamish and Tsleil-Waututh Nations for their hospitality.

Index

Results (228)

Exhibition, Film, and New Media Review

Porcupine Podcast

“How do porcupines hug?” Merrell-Anne Phare asks. “Carefully,” Michael Miltenberger responds. This old joke is the disarming beginning to every episode of Porcupine, a podcast hosted by political consultant Michael Miltenberger and lawyer Merrell-Ann Phare....

Review by Mary Tuti Baker


Book Review

Standoff: Why Reconciliation Fails Indigenous People and How to Fix It

Given the failure of constitutional negotiations to define the meaning of Aboriginal rights and title recognized in Section 35 of the Canadian Constitution – a failure that marks the recalcitrance of provincial and federal governments...

Review by Corey Snelgrove


Book Review

Reading the Diaries of Henry Trent: The Everyday Life of a Canadian Englishman, 1842-1898

In Reading the Diaries of Henry Trent, historian Jack Little asks what can be learned from the diaries of a settler who “failed to adapt” to the transformations of the Victorian era and whose life,...

Review by Alice Louise Gorton


Book Review

Beyond Rights: The Nisga’a Final Agreement and the Challenges of Modern Treaty Relationships

Most Canadians are aware of the existence of treaties between Indigenous peoples and the Crown. Phrases like “treaty rights” and “treaty relationships” form part of the everyday political vocabulary at every level of our federal...

Review by Joshua Nichols


Exhibition, Film, and New Media Review

Sounds Japanese Canadian to Me

Sounds Japanese Canadian to Me is a monthly podcast on Japanese Canadian history and culture. Produced and hosted by Raymond Nakamura and staff of the Nikkei National Museum, the episodes are structured as a casual...

Review by Carin Holroyd


Book Review

What Was Said to Me: The Life of Sti’tum’atul’wut, a Cowichan Woman

Stories are a gift. When someone shares their story with us, it is an offering to know them, to know what it means to be them, to know ourselves and our society. Ruby Peter’s book...

Review by Georgia Sitara


Exhibition, Film, and New Media Review

The Nameless Collective Podcast: Exploring History

Season one of the Nameless Collective, which is produced by Manjot Bains of JugniStyle and hosted by intrepid researchers, historians and archival explorers Naveen Girn, Milan Singh and Paneet Singh, evokes past South Asian Canadian...

Review by Satwinder Kaur Bains


Book Review

Landscapes of Injustice: A New Perspective on the Internment and Dispossession of Japanese Canadians

In historical memory, the forced confinement and exclusion of 22,000 Japanese Canadians from 1942 to 1949 remains one of the darkest and, unfortunately, least understood chapters in Canadian history. Although the story has been told...

Review by Jonathan van Harmelen


Book Review

Decolonizing Discipline: Children, Corporal Punishment, Christian Theologies, and Reconciliation

Decolonizing Discipline is a direct response to the sixth call of action made by the Truth and Reconciliation Commission to repeal Section 43 of Canada’s criminal code, which allows corporal punishment “to correct what is...

Review by Alex Gagne


Book Review

Deep and Sheltered Waters: The History of Tod Inlet

In Deep and Sheltered Waters: The History of Tod Inlet, David R. Gray – with a Foreword from his long-time friends and colleagues, Nancy J. Turner and Robert D. Turner – sets out to illuminate...

Review by Jacquelyn Miller


Book Review

Civilian Internment in Canada: Histories and Legacies

“There is no single historiography of internment” in Canada, write Rhonda L. Hinter and Jim Mochoruk in the introduction of this ambitious collection of essays (9-10). Siloed histories of particular internments, they suggest, convey episodic...

Review by Jordan Stanger-Ross


Book Review

Unmooring The Komagata Maru: Charting Colonial Trajectories

From food (Valenze, 2012) to crops (Ali 2020, Rappaport 2019) to commodities (Curry-Machado, 2013) to digital cultures (Punathambekar and Mohan, 2019) and to empires (Bayly, 2003; Hopkins, 2003) there has been a steady scholarly commitment to...

Review by Dharitri Bhattacharjee


Book Review

Entering Time: The Fungus Man Platters of Charles Edenshaw

In 2013 the Vancouver Art Gallery’s Charles Edenshaw exhibition brought together three argillite platters made in the late 1880s by Da.a. xiigang, Charles Edenshaw – one from the Field Museum in Chicago, one from the...

Review by Martha Black


Book Review

Solemn Words and Foundational Documents: An Annotated Discussion of Indigenous-Crown Treaties in Canada, 1752-1923

When the Indian Residential Schools Truth and Reconciliation Commission released its final report in 2015 it drew attention to the importance of treaty making in the history of Crown-Indigenous relations in Canada. Treaty making, the...

Review by Carole Blackburn


Book Review

“Opposition on the Coast”: The Hudson’s Bay Company, American Coasters, the Russian American Company, and Native Traders on the Northwest Coast, 1825-1846

Jim Gibson has assembled a collection of primary sources: 27 documents from Hudson’s Bay Company (HBC) archives, British Columbia provincial archives, and microfilm of Russian-American Company (RAC) records from the US National Archives. A significant...

Review by Howard Stewart


Book Review

Outside In: A Political Memoir

Outside In can be read and enjoyed as a straightforward memoir of Libby Davies’ remarkable career as an activist and elected official.  It traces her path from her early days working for housing justice in Vancouver’s...

Review by Gord Perks


Book Review

Assembling Unity: Indigenous Politics, Gender and the Union of BC Indian Chiefs

Sarah Nickel’s Assembling Unity: Indigenous Politics, Gender and the Union of BC Indian Chiefs is a significant contribution, not only to the history of Indigenous affairs in British Columbia, but to Indigenous history as a...

Review by Mercedes Peters


Book Review

Dreamers and Designers: The Shaping of West Vancouver

Between 2011 and 2016, the population of the District of West Vancouver declined by one half of one percent. In contrast, the population of Metro Vancouver grew 6.5%; even the comparably wealthy West Point Grey...

Review by Peter Hall


Book Review

Reconsidering Confederation: Canada’s Founding Debates, 1864-1999

A dynamic collection of essays, Reconsidering Confederationsets out to “provide a primer for Canadians who want to better understand similarities and differences between provinces, regions, and peoples” (13). Much more than a basic outline of...

Review by Alex Gagne