We acknowledge that we live and work on unceded Indigenous territories and we thank the Musqueam, Squamish and Tsleil-Waututh Nations for their hospitality.

Index

Results (118)

Book Review

Searching for Pitt Lake Gold: Facts and Fantasy in the Legend of Slumach

Searching for Pitt Lake Gold: Facts and Fantasy in the Legend of Slumach, from local historian Fred Braches, deconstructs the myth of Slumach’s lost gold mine. Perpetuated by a handful of “creative” journalists and seized...

Review by Alice Gorton


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Book Review

Solemn Words and Foundational Documents: An Annotated Discussion of Indigenous-Crown Treaties in Canada, 1752-1923

When the Indian Residential Schools Truth and Reconciliation Commission released its final report in 2015 it drew attention to the importance of treaty making in the history of Crown-Indigenous relations in Canada. Treaty making, the...

Review by Carole Blackburn


Book Review

Cornelius O’Keefe: the Life, Loves, and Legacy of an Okanagan Rancher

Cornelius O’Keefe was one of a small group of pioneer Okanagan ranchers who managed, in the late nineteenth century, to accumulate land, wealth, and influence. His rags-to-riches story was made possible by a combination of...

Review by Duane Thomson


Book Review

A Mill Behind Every Stump

This modest book aims to preserve the vanishing world of the Cariboo homesteader.  It recounts a life of geographic isolation, in Secwépemc traditional territory, that bred both freedom and self-reliance. Life in this context also cultivated...

Review by David Brownstein


Book Review

The Land on Which We Live: Life on the Cariboo Plateau: 70 Mile House to Bridge Lake

In recent years, the historiography of British Columbia has burgeoned. Much of this rich and growing scholarship focuses on the province as a whole, or on its urban centres. We still have much to learn...

Review by Tina Block


Book Review

Disappointment River: Finding and Losing the Northwest Passage

“You can get anywhere if you have the time” (106). Kylik Kisoun, an Inuvialuit guide from Inuvik, said this to Brian Castner when Castner, with the help of four friends, canoed the length of the...

Review by Stan Tag


Book Review

Medicine Unbundled: A Journey through the Minefields of Indigenous Health Care

Medicine Unbundled by Gary Geddes is a humanistic look at the survivors from one of our nation’s most shameful institutions alongside residential schools: segregated healthcare facilities and the treatment of Indigenous peoples within these spaces....

Review by Nicole M. Schafenacker


Book Review

Ranch in the Slocan: A Biography of a Kootenay Farm, 1896 – 2017

Cole Harris’s Ranch in the Slocan: A Biography of a Kootenay Farm, 1896 – 2017 is delightful summer reading. It is, primarily, a history of the Harris family’s Bosun Ranch and a record of the lives of...

Review by Shirley McDonald


Book Review

The Regulation of Peace River: A Case Study for River Management

The Peace River is an impressive natural system, flowing from the Rocky Mountains of northeastern British Columbia to the Arctic Ocean, and it has been historically (and prehistorically) a vital part of the region. From...

Review by Undiné Thompson


Book Review

Everything Shuswap

In 1969, Jim Cooperman arrived in British Columbia from the United States, one of many Vietnam ‘war resisters’ who remade our province in ways that few people yet fully appreciate.  One was in building a...

Review by Michael M’Gonigle


Book Review

Crossing Home Ground: A Grassland Odyssey through Southern Interior British Columbia

David Pitt-Brooke is an advocate for the protection and preservation one of British Columbia’s underappreciated landscapes. Rather than looking towards the more iconic mountain peaks and old-growth forests of British Columbia in his search for...

Review by Lauren Harding


Book Review

Never Rest on Your Ores: Building a Mining Company, One Stone at a Time

How do you turn a relatively modest copper mining play on Lake Temagami in the 1950s into Canada’s largest diversified mining company, with a market capitalization in 2017 of nearly $14 billion? In telling the...

Review by Arn Keeling


Book Review

Unbuilt Environments: Tracing Postwar Development in Northwest British Columbia

In 1921 the Prince George Citizen reminded its readership that “central B.C. is not a new country” (Prince George Citizen 1921). Defining “central B.C.” as those parts of the province situated between the 52nd and...

Review by Daniel Sims


Book Review

The Klondike Gold Rush Steamers: A History of Yukon River Steam Navigation.

Paddle-driven, stern-wheeled river steamboats evolved on the Ohio River in the 1830s into the form they would keep for the next 100 years, enabling them to serve everywhere in the vast Mississippi River basin and...

Review by Robert G. McCandless


Book Review

Through an Unknown Country: The Jarvis-Hanington Winter Expedition through the Northern Rockies, 1874-1875

This miscellany of writings, chiefly by two civil engineers who for parts of their careers  toiled as railway surveyors, aims to carve out a prominent place for them in the history of Canada. Ed Jarvis...

Review by I.S. MacLaren


Book Review

Vistas: Artists on the Canadian Pacific Railway

Vistas, Artists on the Canadian Pacific Railway is about the ways in which painters and photographs met the challenge of capturing the mountain landscape west of Calgary during the late nineteenth century. This book is...

Review by Maria Tippett


Book Review

The Slocan History Series

          Edited by Cole Harris, the Slocan History Series began with four booklets that focus primarily on the mining “boom days” of the 1890s and their long-term effects on the region....

Review by Duff Sutherland


Book Review

Bringing Water to Victoria: An Illustrated History, 1843-1915

Little is as intimate and political as the water that flows from city taps. We fill our bodies with it, we wash our babies in it. Many of us depend on the state to provide...

Review by Adele Perry


Book Review

Aqueduct: Colonialism, Resources, and the Histories We Remember

If, as Adele Perry suggests, history is cacophony, then the opening of Winnipeg’s Canadian Museum of Human Rights (CMHR) in September 2014 was bound to be discordant. Camped outside the CMHR, Anishinaabe from Shoal Lake...

Review by Dylan Burrows