We acknowledge that we live and work on unceded Indigenous territories and we thank the Musqueam, Squamish and Tsleil-Waututh Nations for their hospitality.

Index

Results (73)

Exhibition, Film, and New Media Review

Reflexive Anthropology on Display: Franz Boas, George Hunt, and the Co-Production of Ethnographic Knowledge

  A portion of an 1897 letter from Franz Boas to Kwagu’ł Chiefs, reproduced in English and Kwak’wala, opens The Story Box: Franz Boas, George Hunt and the Making of Anthropology, an exhibition on view...

Review by Christopher T. Green


Kwakwaka'wakw U'mista Cultural Centre Boas Franz George Hunt

Exhibition, Film, and New Media Review

In/consequential Relationships: Refusing Colonial Ethics of Engagement in Yuxweluptun’s Inherent Rights, Vision Rights

On the closing day of the Museum of Anthropology’s Unceded Territories exhibit of Lawrence Paul Yuxweluptun’s art, crowds formed queues long enough to snake through the halls and to pack the exhibit space for the...

Review by Sarah King


Yuxweluptun Lawrence Paul

Book Review

Northwest Voices: Language and Culture in the Pacific Northwest

What, if anything, is the socio-linguistic glue that binds together the region often referred to as the Pacific Northwest? When it comes to language and culture, do the peoples of Washington and Oregon in the...

Review by Mark Turin


Book Review

Towards a New Ethnohistory: Community-Engaged Scholarship Among the People of the River

This book purports to represent a ‘New Ethnohistory’ as community-engaged research in First Nations communities. It consists primarily of essays written by graduate students who participated in the Ethnohistory Field School run since 1997 by...

Review by Alan B. Anderson


Book Review

Shared Histories: Witsuwit’en-Settler Relations in Smithers, British Columbia, 1913-1973

Geographer Tyler McCreary’s book about Witsuwit’en-settler relations in Smithers is a valuable new addition to research and writing on histories of place in settler-colonial contexts. Shared Histories demonstrates how academic work can be integrated with local...

Review by Molly Malone


Book Review

At the Bridge: James Teit and an Anthropology of Belonging

James Teit was an amazing community-based engaged anthropologist long before such labels were invented. Wendy Wickwire’s anthropological life story of Teit is a consummate account and indeed, as the top of page advertisement exhorts, it...

Review by Charles R. Menzies


Book Review

The W̲SÁNEĆ and Their Neighbours: Diamond Jenness on the Coast Salish of Vancouver Island, 1935

Anthropologist Rolf Knight launched a new chapter of Indigenous history in 1978 with the publication of his book, Indians at Work: An Informal History of Native Indian Labour in British Columbia, 1858-1930.[1]  In contrast to...

Review by Wendy Wickwire


Book Review

Secwépemc People, Land, and Laws: Yerí7 re Stsq’ey’s-kucw

Marianne and Ron Ignace are members of the Secwépemc First Nation in south-central British Columbia.  Ron was raised by his great-grandparents, grew up speaking Secwepemctsín, and is a former Chief.  Both Ron and Marianne have...

Review by Robin Ridington


Book Review

The Contemporary Coast Salish: Essays by Bruce Granville Miller

I was a third-year undergraduate at UBC in 1990 when Bruce Miller joined the Department of Anthropology and Sociology, launching his second career after having taught high school.  Between 1991 and 1994 I took several...

Review by Brian Thom


Book Review

Museums and the Past: Constructing Historical Consciousness

Museums and the Past opens with a statement that “‘museums’ and ‘historical consciousness’ dovetail almost intuitively” (3). I don’t think they do, and this book does not convince me. The editors offer a couple of...

Review by Alan Gordon


Book Review

Maps and Memes: Redrawing Culture, Place and Identity in Indigenous Communities

In this innovative and important book, Gwilyn Eades, a geographer from Terrace, undertakes a kaleidoscopic investigation of the significance of maps, cartography, contemporary geo-coding technologies (GIS, GPS, and Google Earth), and questions of spatial cognition...

Review by Daniel Clayton


Book Review

Where the Rivers Meet: Pipelines, Participatory Resource Management, and Aboriginal-State Relations in the Northwest Territories

In Where the Rivers Meet, Carly Dokis skillfully examines local responses to the Mackenzie Gas Project — a proposed natural gas pipeline through the Sahtu Region of the Northwest Territories — and how these are...

Review by Mark Stoller


Book Review

The Bastard of Fort Stikine: The Hudson’s Bay Company and the Murder of John McLoughlin, Jr.

  During his round-the-world voyage in 1842, Hudson’s Bay Company (HBC) Governor George Simpson arrived at Fort Stikine and discovered that chief trader John McLoughlin Jr. had been killed. Two recent books discuss this event....

Review by Corey Larson


Book Review

Islands’ Spirit Rising: Reclaiming the Forests of Haida Gwaii

In Islands’ Spirit Rising: Reclaiming the Forests of Haida Gwaii, Louise Takeda challenges the dominant epistemological perspective on the politics of BC resource management in order to “[further] political and social justice” and “give back”...

Review by James Davey


Book Review

The First Nations of British Columbia: An Anthropological Overview. Third Edition

Despite its slim size (the main body of text is only 117 pages), The First Nations of British Columbia: An Anthropological Overview is a useful primer for those hoping to learn the basic issues relevant...

Review by Christine Elsey


Book Review

A Missing Genocide and the Demonization of its Heroes

Tom Swanky’s self-published book A Missing Genocide and the Demonization of its Heroes brings into sharp focus the problems faced by historians steeped in a discipline that does not fully appreciate the culturally constructed limitations...

Review by Chris Arnett


Book Review

From the Hands of a Weaver: Olympic Peninsula Basketry through Time

This book tells the story of the many roles of basketry in the lives of the First Peoples of Washington’s Olympic Peninsula and of the diverse styles and materials used by the weavers, mainly women....

Review by Nancy J. Turner