BC Studies 159 (Autumn 2008)

BC Studies 159 (Autumn 2008)

Price
0.00 CAD

                                                          OUT OF STOCK

Book Reviews
Finding Ft. George
Issue BC Studies 159 (Autumn 2008)

by Rob Budde

- Reviewed by Mark Diotte (pg: 145-7)

The Reckoning of Boston Jim: A Novel
Issue BC Studies 159 (Autumn 2008)

by Claire Mulligan

- Reviewed by Jocelyn Smith (pg: 147-8)

In Search of Canadian Political Culture
Issue BC Studies 159 (Autumn 2008)

by Nelson Wiseman

- Reviewed by Dennis Pilon (pg: 152-5)

The British Columbia Atlas of Wellness
Issue BC Studies 159 (Autumn 2008)

by C.P. Keller, Leslie T. Foster

- Reviewed by Neil Hanlon (pg: 160-2)


Issue BC Studies 159 (Autumn 2008)

- Reviewed by Anna Hall (pg: 166-8)

Contributors

159

Dr. Leslie Dawn teaches art history at the University of Lethbridge. His recent publications include "Re:Reading Reid and the 'Revival'" in Bill Reid and Beyond, edited by Karen Duffek and Charlotte Townsend-Gault; National Visions, National Blindness: Canadian Art and Identities in the 1920s, which was awarded the 2008 Raymond Klibansky prize for outstanding English language book in the humanities, and "The Englishness of Canadian Art" in John O'Brien and Peter White, eds., Beyond Wilderness, The Group of Seven, Canadian Identity, and Contemporary Art. Prof. Dawn lives in Victoria when he can.

Jenéa Tallentire is an instructor in History and Women's Studies at the University of the Fraser Valley in Abbotsford, British Columbia. Her dissertation (completed at UBC in 2006) focused on defining marital status as a category of analysis for women's history, through the lens of single women in British Columbia from 1880 to 1930. With Kim Snowden she is the co-founder and chief co-editor of thirdspace: a journal of feminist theory and culture and is also the founder of the Scholars of Single Women Network. Her post-doctoral research explores the intersections of gender, Whiteness, and nation in the writings of three ever-single Canadian women. 

Richard A. Rajala is an Associate Professor of History at the University of Victoria. Recent books include Feds, Forests, and Fire: A Century of Canadian Forestry Innovation (Ottawa: Canada Science and Technology Museum, 2005), and Up-Coast: Forests and Industry on British Columbia's North Coast, 1870-2005 (Victoria: Royal British Columbia Museum, 2006).

David Brownstein completed a PhD at UBC's Institute for Resources, Environment and Sustainability in 2006, entitled "Sunday Walks and Seedtraps: The Many Natural Histories of British Columbia Forest Conservation, 1890-1925." Presently he is a sessional instructor in the Department of Geography at UBC, and principal of the consulting firm Klahanie Research Ltd.

Dorothee Schreiber teaches ethnoecology in the School of Environmental Studies at the University of Victoria. Her research interests include traditional ecological knowledge, Native-settler relations and natural resource management, and ethnohistory of the Northwest coast.