BC Studies 150 (Summer 2006)

BC Studies 150 (Summer 2006)

Aquaculture
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Book & Film Reviews
The British Columbia Atlas of Child Development
Issue BC Studies 150 (Summer 2006)

by Paul Kershaw, Clyde Hertzmann, Kate Trafford, Lori Irwin

- Reviewed by Mona Gleason (pg: 118-21)

Contributors

150

Melanie Buddle teaches History and Canadian Studies at Trent University in Peterborough, Ontario. Her most recent publication was "The Business of Women: Female Entrepreneurship in British Columbia, 1901-1941," Journal of the West  vol. 43, no. 2, Spring 2004. Her current research project is a post-World War Two comparison of self-employed women in Peterborough, Ontario and Victoria, BC. She completed her PhD at the University of Victoria in 2003. 

Dianne Newell is a Professor of History and Director of the Peter Wall Institute for Advanced Studies at the University of British Columbia. A specialist in the socio-econmic history of technology, she has published extensively on Canada's Pacific coast fisheries, including: Tangled Webs of History: Indians and the Law in Canada's Pacific Coast Fisheries (U. of Toronto Press, 1993). She has published one other collaborative essay with Dorothee Schreiber, "Why Spend a Lot of Time Dwelling on the Past?: Understanding Resistance to Contemporary Salmon Farming in Kwakwaka'wakw Territory," in Arif Dirlik, ed., Pedagogies of the Global: Knowledge in the Human Interest.

Gabriela Pechlaner is a doctoral candidate in sociology at Simon Fraser University. Her current research investigates the advent of biotechnology in agriculture, focusing on changes to control over food production and on the lawsuits emerging around the technology.

Murray B. Rutherford is an assistant professor in the School of Resource and Environmental Management at Simon Fraser University, where he does research on environmental policy and planning. His co-edited book Coexisting with Large Carnivores: Lessons from Greater Yellowstone was recently published by Island Press.

Dorothee Schreiber, an environmental scientist, completed her PhD in 2003, in the Department of Resource Management and Environment at the University of British Columbia. In 2004 she took up a Social Sciences and Humanities Council of Canada postdoctoral fellowship in the Department of Anthropology, McGill University. She has published three research papers, two in international journals on aboriginal research, and a fourth, collaboratively with Dianne Newell, "Why Spend a Lot of Time Dwelling on the Past?: Understanding Resistance to Contemporary Salmon Farming in Kwakwaka'wakw Territory," in Arif Dirlik, ed., Pedagogies of the Global: Knowledge in the Human Interest.

Robert Scott B.A., LL.B., graduated from the University of Victoria, Faculty of Law, in 2005 and currently works at the law firm of Berge, Hart & Cassels in Victoria, British Columbia. He has been involved in numerous research projects concerning natural resource and land use issues in British Columbia.

Chris Tollefson is an Associate Professor at the Faculty of Law, University of Victoria and Executive Director of the UVic Environmental Law Centre. He has published on a range of environmental and resource law topics particularly in relation to Indigenous rights issues. Research for this article was supported through a grant from the AquaNet Centre of Excellence. Professor Tollefson gratefully acknowledges the research support of Cam Elder and Robert Scott (UVic Law); the generous assistance of Jane Huria, Charlotte Severne, Merv Whipp and Kirsty Woods during his research visit to New Zealand; and the helpful commentaries of Barron Carswell, Andrew Geddes and Jacinta Ruru on earlier drafts of this manuscript.