BC Studies 136 (Winter 2002/03)

BC Studies 136 (Winter 2002/03)

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Review Essay

Tale-Telling Women and Telling Tales of Women

Issue BC Studies 136 (Winter 2002/03)

by Connie Brim (pgs: 103-9)

  • Hobnobbing with a Countess and Other Okanagan Adventures: The Diaries of Alice Barrett Parke, 1891-1900
    by Jo Fraser Jones
  • The Judge's Wife: Memoirs of a British Columbia Pioneer
    by Eunice M.L. Harrison
  • Telling Tales: Essays in Western Women's History
    by Catherine A. Cavanaugh, Randi R. Warne
  • Wild West Women: Travellers, Adventurers and Rebels
    by Rosemary Neering

OJS Link


  

National Parks: What are they good for?

Issue BC Studies 136 (Winter 2002/03)

by James Murton (pgs: 111-5)

  • Phantom Parks: The Struggle to Save Canadas National Parks
    by Rick Searle
  • Natural Selections: National Parks in Atlantic Canada, 1935-1970
    by Alan McEachern
  • Where the Mountains Meet the Prairies: A History of Waterton Country
    by Graham A. MacDonald
  • Guardians of the Wild: A History of the Warden Service of Canada's National Parks
    by Robert J. Burns, Mike Schintz

OJS Link


  
Book & Film Reviews
Mine
Issue BC Studies 136 (Winter 2002/03)

by Steven Collis

- Reviewed by Robert McIntosh (pg: 149-50)

Contributors

136

Trevor Barnes has taught in the Department of Geography at the University of British Columbia since 1983. This is his third article in BC Studies. His most recent book is an edited collection with Eric Sheppard,^ Companion to Economic Geography (Blackwell 2000). He is a recipient of the Canadian Association of Geographer's Award for Scholarly Distinction. 

Tanya Behrisch is the international coordinator for Co-operative Education at Simon Fraser University. She is responsible for developing international co-op work opportunities for Simon Fraser University students. Ms. Behrisch is an accomplished oil painter of BC coastal landscapes that can be viewed at www.behrisch.com

Connie Brim is an associate professor in the English Department at the University College of the Cariboo. 

Misao Dean is a member of the English Department at the University of Victoria. She has published books and articles on early Canadian women writers, and is interested in post-colonial studies and material culture. 

Joe Denham lives on the Sunshine Coast. His first collection of poetry is due out with Nightwood Editions in the fall of 2003. 

Karen Duder is a sessional lecturer in the Gender and Women's Studies Programme and the Visual Culture Programme at the University of Otago, New Zealand. Her article "'Two middle-aged & very good looking females that spend all their week-ends together': female professors and same-sex relationships in Canada, 1910 -1950," will be published later this year in Historical Identities: The Professoriate in Canada (University of Toronto Press 2003). 

Rishma Dunlop is a professor of Literary Studies in the Faculty of Education at York University, Toronto. She is the author of two volumes of poetry, Boundary Bay (Staccato/Turnstone Press 1999) and The Body of My Garden (Mansfield Press 2002). The poem "Esperanza" in this issue of BC Studies is from a manuscript in progress. 

Christopher Garrish recently completed a Masters degree in history at the University of Saskatchewan that explored the impact of the Agricultural Land Reserve upon the Okanagan fruit industry. He is currently enrolled in the Urban Studies Program at Simon Fraser University. 

Karin Gray is in the final year of her MFA in Creative Writing at the University of British Columbia and has had poems appear in Room of Ones Own, Wascana Review, Fugue, Wreck, Comfort Zone, and Bywords. Her thesis is a book-length work of poetry that explores changes in habits and patterns of living when moving house. 

Roger Hayter has taught in the Department of Geography at Simon Fraser University since 1976. He recently authored Flexible Cross Roads: The Restructuring of BCs Forest Economy (UBC Press 2000), and is a recipient of the Canadian Association of Geographer's Award for Scholarly Distinction. 

Amielle Lake has lived in Vancouver for over 15 years. A recent graduate of the University of British Columbia English Literature program, she is currently pursuing her Masters in International Business Administration in Europe. This is her first published poem. 

James Murton recently completed his PhD in History at Queens University, examining British Columbia's engineering of environmental change for early 20th century agricultural settlement. He is the author of the award-winning article, "La Normandie du Nouveau Monde: la société Canada Steamship Lines, l'antimodernisme et la promotion du Québec ancien," in the Revue d'histoire de l'Amérique française. He grew up in Port Alberni, near Pacific Rim National Park. 

 

Soundworks

Public Acts and Private Languages: Bisexuality and the Multiple Discourses of Constance Grey Swartz

Issue BC Studies 136 (Winter 2002/03)

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Unscrambling the Omelette: Understanding British Columbia's Agricultural Land Reserve

Issue BC Studies 136 (Winter 2002/03)

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Managing Diversity in the Representation of BC History: Point Ellice House and "Chinatown"

Issue BC Studies 136 (Winter 2002/03)

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"I Don't Really Like the Mill; In Fact, I Hate the Mill": Changing Youth Vocationalism Under Fordism and Post-Fordism in Powell River, British Columbia

Issue BC Studies 136 (Winter 2002/03)

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